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Full text of "Antioch News 03/13/1998"


Four Sections — 96 Pages FRIDAY; MARCH 13, 1998 A Lakeland Newspaper /75 cents 

'This is afire academy 



High-Tech 





Fire department torches houses in the 
name of training 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Firefighters train to put out 
fires the opposite way that 
fires work in real life. It is 
the flipped side of a very 
hot coin. 

For example: 

The owner of the home invites 
the fire department over to burn the 
house down. 

The fire department requests a 
permit from the United States Envi- 
ronmental Protection Agency for 
permission to burn the house down. 
A permit from the Illinois Historic 
Preservation Agency is also re- 
quired. 

Fire department personnel set 
Ares all day long as candidate fire- . 
fighters train to extinguish them. 

Inside the burning house, can- 
didate firefighters sit In rooms 
which are on fire to watch how the 
room burns, then they leave. Others 
candidate firefighters come in and 
put out the fire. 

When Antioch residents dial 911 
to get the fire department to their 
home, it is possibly the most vivid 
encounter wi til their local tax dol- 



lars at work that homeowners will 
ever experience. 

Putting out fires is also very dif- 
ferent from what homeowners may 
expect. 

Firefighters fight fires with high 
powered fans, Velcro®, technology, 
electrical extension cords, cell tele- 
phones, chain saws, passports, 
teamwork, courage, safety proce- 
dures, face-masks with their own air 
supply, and knowledge that comes 
from training. 

March 1 was a quiet Sunday, ex- 
cept near Depot and Anita Street. 
Six fire departments met there with 
24 candidate firefighters to train 
them how to extinguish fire by 
burning a home formerly owned by 
Fran and Vin ce Nauseda.. , t 

Firefighter candidates were 
from Antioch, Lake Villa, Fox Lake, 
Round Lake, Newport, and Long 
Grove. 

Neighborhood residents had 
been told what would happen. "The 
firemen came and spoke to us and 
told us what would be happening," 
said Gayle Davis who lives directly 
across the street from the home to 

Please see HIGH-TECH I A3 




'Fire Academy instructors, top 
photograph, watch one of six 
candidate firefighter companies 
enter a burning home to extin- 
guish fires. Monitoring the train- 
ing were, left to right, Antioch 
firefighters Kevin Kelly and 
William Eckert, Lake Villa fire- 
fighter Brock Millsop, and Anti- 
och's Robert Johnson and 
Richard Klean. Right, senior 
leadership of the Quadrant 2 
Lake County Fire Chiefs Associa- 
tion Fire Academy Included, left 
to right, Antioch Fire Chief Den- 
nis Voliing, Round Lake Fire Chief 
Paul Maplethorpe, and Antioch 
Captain Robert Johnson. Twenty- 
four candidate firefighters from 
six area departments received 
"live fire" training.— Photographs 
by Kenneth Patchen 





Voters have three candidate choice 




HEALTH AND FITNESS 

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Tips and ideas on how you 
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that perfect job 

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Local wrestlers try to 
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—PLEASE SEE PACE Bl 

INDEX 



Mortensen 



Finance B13 

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County .; CI 

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Obituaries ... C12 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Voters will face three local 
candidate decisions on March 
17. Running for reelection is 
Judy Martini. She is challenged 
for the Republican nomination 
for Lake County Board District 
1 representative by Michael J. 
Mortensen and Linda Peder- 
sen. 

Martini said that she works 
to represent the people, to pro- 
mote the unique economy of 
the Chain of Lakes region, and 
to protect the natural resource 
base upon which her district is 
dependent for its character. 

"I am seeking re-election to 
the County Board because Dis- 
trict 1 is facing many serious de- 
cisions as we enter the new mil- 
lennium," she said. "With the 
Village of Antioch projections of tripling in population 
by the year 2010, it is not a good time for a novice en- 
tering onto the county Board seat." 

Martini presents herself as a candidate of the peo- 
ple and pledges to represent them. She said that she has 
honored her commitment to be free of the machine pol- 
itics that people did not like in the district when they 
voted for her in 1994. 





Martini 



Michael J. Mortensen seeks to bring his past Lake she said. 



County public service to deci- 
sions that come before the Lake 
County Board. 

"I am running for the county 
board because I believe I can 
make a significant contribution 
based on my knowledge gained 
in the past 28 years," he said. 
He cites his experience within- 
the Lake County criminal jus- 
tice system and knowledge of 
budget operations as a basis for 
views on how costs can be con- 
tained and public safety main- 
tained. 

Mortensen has pledged if 
elected he will not accept a 
salary or benefits for the posi- 
tion. 

Linda Pedersen's impact on 
the District 1 area has emerged 
from almost two decades worth 
of her active volunteer invest- 
ment in the community. 
"1 would like to bring to this position the quality of 
honest and fair representation to all the residents of 
District 1," said Pedersen. 

"Having been very active for the past 16 years in my 
community, and having taken active rolls in various 
forms of service to my community, I feel that I am in 
touch with the spirit of this community and have a feel 
for the direction our residents would like to see us go," 



Pedersen 



Embroiled 
in three-way 

race for 
Republican 

county 
board bid 



Bomb 

Churchfinds 
bomb threat note 
before worship 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church 
officials found a note Saturday, 
March 7 that said a bomb would ex- 
plode during the 11 a.m. Sunday 
worship service. 

Antioch police officers, fire de- 
partment personnel, and Lake 
County Sheriff's officers searched the 
building from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. to lo- 
cate the bomb. 

No bomb was found. 

On Sunday, church services were 
rescheduled. 

"We had a one o'clock service," 
said Senior Pastor David Groleau. 
The church was vacated during the 
period when the bomb was to have 
exploded. 

He said that all youth programs 

Please see BOMB I A3 



GET CONNECTED 

Look for us on the Internet at 

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A2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 13, 1998 



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WALLEYE TOURNAMENTS 
ON THE CHAIN O'UKES 




Hosted By 




25400 W. Bluff Lake, Antioch 
(847) 395-4050 



Qualifying Events 

m- Sunday, April 5 #5 -Sunday, July 26 

#2 -Sunday, April 26 #6 -Sunday, August 30 

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#4 -Sunday, June 28 

Championship Weekend October 24 & 25 



For Rules and Entry Forms, see Chain O'Lakes Area Bait Shops. 



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Lake County. Treamrer 

Voters are seeking a professional, qualified administrator to 
oversee the handling and distribution of S3 billion a year in 
Lake County property tax dollars and other revenue. 

Candidate should be a CPA and have an MBA in Finance with 
solid financial planning experience. Voters want a "self- 
starter" with a positive attitude who will work to protect their 
dollars. Primary election is March 17, final candidate 
selection will be at the November 3, 1998 election. 



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ResumS: 

Lynda C. Paul, CPA, MBA 

Democratic Candidate for Lake County Treasurer 

• B.S. Degree in Corporate Finance. 

• MBA from Keller Graduate School. 

• Certified Public Accountant (CPA). 

• Financial Planner with MetUfe Securities. 

• Desire to bring professional accountability to 
Lake County Treasurer's office. 

• Willingness to serve as a taxpayer's 
advocate, opening the office to the public 
through new educational and outreach 
programs. 

• Experience balancing $9 billion in revenue at 
Abbott Laboratories. 



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ANTIOCH LAKE VILLA FOK LAKE SPRING GROVE 







CHICAGO TRIBUNE 
THE NEWS SUN ANTIOCH REPORTER 

LAKE VILLA RECORD FOX LAKE PRESS 
SIERRA CLUB ILLINOIS CITIZENS ACTION 
LAKE COUNTY CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 

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LAKE COUNTY FARM BUREAU 















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March 13', 1998 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



FROMPAGEAi 



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HBGH-TECH: House torched 



be burned to the ground. "It made 
me feel better about the whole 
thing," she said. 

, "This is a fire academy, put on 
by Quadrant 2 of theLake County 
Fire.Chiefs Association, of which 
Chief Paul Maplethorpe in Round 
Lake is the overseer," said Captain 
Robert Johnson of the First Fire 
Protection District Antioch Fire De- 
partment. He is known as BJ. 

He said that firefighter candi- 
dates are organized into teams of 
four people with an instructor who 
works with them through the day^ 
"They will go in and they'll do 
search and rescue. They'll do 
forcible entry. They will do ventila- 
tion, which is opening the roof. 
They will do water supply, which 
teaches them how the water is laid 
out, how water gets to the engine, 
how water gets to the fire," BJ said. 

Those are considered to be 
non-fire training events. Late in the 
morning the department starts 
live-fire training. 

. "We'll seta room on fire and 
the students will go in and actually 
put that fire out. There'll be live fire 
in that room." 

Deputy Chief Leonard 
Sakalowski is known as the depart- 
ment's "Guru Fire Setter." He 
arranges the room in the house for 
the training event, lights the fire, 
and then tells the trainers to come 
in and put it out. 

Part of the training requires can- 
didate firefighters to enter the burn- 
ing room and just watch the fire 
build and bum. After their observa- 
tion period is over, they leave the 
room and other candidate fire fight- 
ers come in*o extinguish the blaze. 

Then Sakalowski bums another 
room. 

During the day long fire train- 
ing academy, the Antioch fire sta- 
tion was occupied by firefighters - 
from Wilmot, Salem, and Trevor 
Wisconsin. It was their responsibili- 
ty to respond to all emergency calls 
that came to the station. By mid- 
morning, they had responded to 
two calls. 

The first response was to a 
building in the area and a second 
was to secure the parking lot at An- 
tioch Community High School. A 
Flight For 1 Life helicopter had ar- 
rived to assist in a medical emer- 
gency being undertaken by the An- 
tioch Rescue Squad. 

Candidate firefighters were not 
the only people undergoing train- 
ing. The professional fire personnel 



were also using the occasion to 
practice safety procedures that 
keep track of each firefighter. : 
" What you have here is an ac- 
countability system that we use oh 
all fire scenes," said Richard Frank- 
son from the incident command - 
vehicle. A system of passports for 
each firefighter allowed him to 
know where everyone involved in 
the operation was located. A miss- 
ing firefighter could be immediately 
identified in order to rescue him or 
her if necessary. Firefighters stick 
their passports on their hats or 
clothing with Velcro® and later at- 
tach them to clipboards to create 
team units as required. 

"For instance, right now, our 
Chief (Dennis Veiling) is at the high 
school for the Flight For Life call," 
Frankson said. 

If necessary, using radio tech- 
nology, Frankson could request 
team leaders to do a quick check of 
their personnel and immediately 
know if everyone is accounted for. 

By late afternoon, team training 
sessions had been completed, and 
it was necessary to destroy the al- 
ready severely damaged training fa- 
cility. At 3:40 p.m., it was evident 
that the day's final fire had been set 

.House fires are not one-inch 
flames on a candle, blue flames on a 
stove, or roaring logs in a fireplace. 
For one thing, the flames in a room 
on fire in a burning building tumble 
upon one another in a wide variety 
of shapes and sizes, 

Some flames are like large flat 
sheets.* Others appear as delicate 
lace. Some move more vigorously 
than do others. In some areas, the 
flames tumble in a swirl that feeds 
Itself from gases created by tem- 
peratures measured as hundreds of 
degrees. The wind is a key ingredi- 
ent. 

These are the flames and the 
fire witnessed by many neighbor- 
hood residents who watched the 
home bum from across the street. 
To maintain safety, the Round 
Lake Fire Department poured water 
from the end of an extended ladder 
through the air into the boiling 
smoke above the house. The pur- 
pose is to extinguish airborne cin- 
ders. They also occasionally spray 
the house in order to control the in- 
tensity of the burning. Within an 
hour, the spectacular part of the 
conflagration is over. 

"The overall burn was safe, and 
that is our number one priority — 
safety," BJ said at the end of the day. 




BOMB: Threat at church 



and meetings went on as scheduled, 

"So, as far as we know, it was a 
prank," Groleau said. 

The note was found Saturday 
morning taped to a secretary's desk. 
There was no evidence of forced en- 
try to the church building. 

The hand-written note said that 
the "so-called church" is going 
down, that a bomb is set to go off at 
11:45 a.m. on March 8. 

"That is right in the heart of the 
service," said Groleau. He estimated 



that there might be as many as 300 
people in the building at that time. 

Antioch and County law en- 
forcement officials searched the 
building Saturday. 

"It was very thorough," Groleau 
said. Officers were present Sunday 
during services. 

"I was very pleased. They han- 
dled it quickly, very professionally, 
and discretely," said Groleau. "I was 
very pleased with our local officers. 
They were here in a heart-beat." 



Antioch News 

Vol. 113 No. 11 A Lakeland Newspaper Founded 1886 



(USPS 027-060) Editorial Off**: 

30 South Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 
(847)223-8161 



Momboi ot IMrxn PiMi Ai»oc. 

Look for us on tho Internet at 
WWW.LPNEWS.COM 



Otfico or Publcfllloo: M Soulh Whitney St., Oiayriok*. It 60O30. Phon* (847}223-8iat. 

Published weekty. periodical mail poilogo paid at Groyslnko, IL 60030 

Homo Delrvery Ratoi: S24.50 pef year In Lake, Cook. Kenoiha and McHenry Counfiei; 

olsewhero $40.00 pet year by mail paid In advance. 

Poslfiwutof: Send addrett change* to Antioch News. 30 South Whitney SIimI P.O. Don 268. Qtayilake. IBinoo 60030. 



WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publisher 
KAREN O'TOOLE 

Ovulation Mgr. 

V1NCESAPUT0 

Dispta/ Advertising Mgr, 

MAUREEN COMBS 

Classified Advertising Mgr. 



M.R. SCHROEDER 

Founder- 1 904-1 986 



fc'J 



WILLIAM ML SCHROEDER 

President 
MIME KOOB 

Comptroller 

CORKEY GROSS 

Public Relations Manager 
yMOES RHONDA HETRICK BURKE 

Managing Editor 



NEAL TUCKER 

Composition MgrJExecutivo Editor 



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Happy Century 

Marion Kulack celebrates his 100th birthday with family and friends at J.f .'s Roadhouse in Antioch 
Saturday. Kulack was born March 6, 1898 jn Austria and came to the United States to Ellis Island 
in 1912. —Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Pedersen awarded with 

c 

Lincoln Fellowship honor 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Linda Pedersen has been award- 
ed a 1998 Illinois Lincoln series fel- 
lowship to help her prepare for poli- 
cy-making positions in government 
and in the Republican Party. 

The fellowship includes study in 
Springfield, Illinois and Washington, 
D.C; Pedersen is one of 15 Republi- 
can women awarded the fellowship. 

"The Lincoln Series Is fortunate, 
that Linda Pedersen accepted our 
fellowship," said Republican Nation- 
al Committee woman Mary Jo ArndL 
Arndt serves on the board of gover- 
nors of the Lincoln Series. 

The Lincoln Series is sponsored 
by the Illinois Lincoln Excellence in 
Public Service Series, Inc., a non-prof- 
it political education organization. 

Linda Pedersen is currently a 
candidate for District 1 Lake County 
Board representative, the position 
held by Judy Martini. 

"It has been absolutely wonder- 
ful," said Pedersen, "I've gotten so 
much out of it." 

The fellowship program is a se- 
ries of nine seminars. Three days 



with national leaders and two ses- 
sions of two-days with Springfield 
leaders are part of theseminar series. 
Graduation from the program is in 
September at the annual Excellence 

Awards Dinner. 

The first session was in January, 
accordingto Pedersen. The seminars 
prepare participants for continuing 
work in politics and professions as- 
sociated with politics. She said what 
she learns at the sessions translates 
very well Into usable experience at 
the community level. 

"They're in different parts of the 
state," she said. She has an opportu- 
nity tp meet people throughout Illi- 
nois.. 

Tou have to be sponsored to ap- 
ply for it," she said. "I was sponsored 
by Bob Churchill." Pedersen was one 
of sixty candidates who applied. She 
was among the 24 people inter- 
viewed as part of the selection 
process. Now she is one of the 15 se- 
lected program participants. 

The Lincoln Series was founded 
in 1994 by the National Cornmittee- 
women's Roundtable, a unit club of 
the Illinois Federation of Republican 
Women. 



Fire, Police 




up for vote 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 






Village residents will vote on 
Tuesday, March 17 for or against a 
proposal to build a new fire substa- 
tion east of the Wisconsin Railroad 
tracks and a new police station in 
downtown Antioch. 

Village trustees voted unani- 
mously to submit to voters the ques- 
tion to issue $2.5 million in general 
obligation bonds to build the new 
buildings and to purchase fire safety 
equipment 

Taxpayers who own a home with 
a $90,000 market value will pay initial 
taxes of $40 a year more for the im- 
proved fire and police services. That 
amount is expected to decrease to 
S26 within ten years as the village 
population increases with new resi- 
dential and business development 

Homeowners of $120,000 homes 
will initially pay about S53 more per 
year, an amount expected to reduce 
each year to approximately S34 with- 
in a ten year period. 



Hot stacks and baked goods to benefit high school 



A pancake breakfast and 
bake sale will be held 
March 22 in the Antioch 
Community High School 
Cafeteria. It is sponsored by the 
Student Assistance Program and 
the A.LL Parent Network Proceeds 
help Student Assistance Program 
education programs. The A.LL 
Parent Network uses some of the 
proceeds to underwrite costs of the 
Post-prom event which they spon- 
sor. Tickets for adults are $4 and 
children 4 to 12 are $2.50. Senior 
Citizen tickets are $3. 



'* '•>-. 



OUR 
4f TOWN 




Solid Waste Agency of Lake 
County is sponsoring Timothy 
Wenk Magic on Monday, March 16, 
at 10:45 a.m. at Antioch Lower 
School. "The Magic of Recycling!" 
Show is a winner of the National 
Recycling Coalition's award for 
Outstanding Public Education. The 
show is an educational school as- 
sembly program to teach children 
in kindergarten to grade 4 about re- 
cycling benefits. There is audience 
participation in the program. Par- 
ents who wish to attend should 
check with Principal Mary Kay Mc- 
Neill at 847-395-0045. 



KenPatchen 



named to the North Suburban All 
Conference Academic Team compe- 
tition by eight team coaches. Teams 
from Antioch, Warren, Zion, Liber- 
tyville, Lake Forest, North Chicago, 
and Mundelein High Schools com- 
peted March 6 in Mundelein. 
Stevenson had the first place team. 



A Spring Craft Show will be at 
the VFW Hall on April 4 from 9 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. Dorothee Hlmber said 
that space remains available for 
crafters who want to participate in 
the show. She said that the show 
has great gift ideas for Easter, 
spring, and Mother's Day. If you 
would like to participate, give her a 
call at 847-395-6934. VFW Post 
#4551 is at 75 North Avenue. 



Johnson at the Cooperative Exten- 
sion Service cited Hansen for service 
beyond expectations. "Dave really 
went above and beyond his duties 
and I want you to know how much I 
appreciated his efforts." 

The Antioch Chamber of Com- 
merce and Industry's CAN commit- 
tee will be selling 260 raffle tickets at 
$100 apiece. This is their annual 
$10,000 Raffle Fundraiser. Tickets 
can be shared by as many as one to 
10 people. President Barbara 
Porch said that Chamber members 
have tickets. If they are successful in 
selling all these tickets, the Cham- 
ber will have raised $14,000. 

Ariel Kerby, 7, of Antioch, is 
featured on the cover of Babette's 
^Pageant and Talent Gazette maga- 
zine. It is a quarterly publication, na- 
tionally acclaimed as the biggest and 
best national children's pageant 
magazine. Kerby is featured as a 
spring cover queen. Kerby is on her 
way to the Little Miss Illinois Pageant 
in Peoria on March 27 and 28. 



Tim Chilcote, student at Anti- 
och Community High School, was 



Antioch Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Works BUI Smith received a let- 
ter of praise for one helpful village 
employee, Dave Hansen. Nancy 



If you have interesting informa- 
tion or anecdotes to submit for 
"Our Town" call staff reporter Ken 
Patchen at 223-81 61, ext. 131 or 
e-mail, edit@lnd.com." 






9S 




A4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 13, 1998 



If your teeth 

were this 

beautiful, you'd 

smile too. 




LETTER TO THE EDITOR 



Vote on March 17-support public safety 



A fabulous smile is always in style. 
And with today's new techniques, 
there's no reason not to have one. 
We an brighten dull teeth, close 
spaces, repair chips, and improve 

crooked teeth with porcelain 

veneers. It's more affordable than 

you might think. So call today for 

a personal consultation. 

Family & Cosmetic Dentistry 
Dr. Brian Gniadek 

2056 E. Grand Ave. 
Lindenhurst 

(847) 265-9070 



On Tuesday, March 17 Antioch 
voters will have an opportunity to 
vote to support the construction of 
two public safety buildings. If ap- 
proved, a new fire station will be con- 
structed east of the railroad tracks on 
Deep Lake Road. The cost of the sta- 
tion will be paid jointly by the Village 
and the Antioch Township First Fire 
Protection District. A new Police Sta- 
tion will be built by the Village in 
downtown Antioch. Neither the Vil- 
lage nor the District has requested a 
referendum since 1977. Both of these 
buildings are needed for our Fire and 
Police Depts. to continue to provide 
the high level of services residents 
have received throughout the years. 

Details regarding the rcferen- 



m PSYCHIC FAIRS 



dum, the histories of existing build- 
ings, and reasons why the new facil- 
ities are needed have been widely 
published in newspapers, the March 
issue of the Village "Community Cal- 
endar," and on the Village website. 
However, if you would like addition- 



al information, please contact Fire 
Chief Dennis Vollingat 395-551 1, Po- 
lice Chief Charles Watkins at 385- 
8585, Village Administrator Tim 
Wells or me at 395-1000. 

We all can help to keep Antioch 
a safe place in which to live, to main- 



tain the pride and concern we have 
about our Village and its inhabitants, 
and to maintain property values in 
the Village by VOTING YES ON 
MARCH 17 FOR PUBLIC SAFETY. 
Marilyn Shlnejlug 
Mayor of Antioch 



Komets hockey wins in Wisconsin 



Two hockey players from Anti- 
och helped their Kenosha Komets 
PeeWee C team win the Wisconsin 
State Hockey Championship at Mc- 
Farland over the past weekend, Ben 
Bergmann, a fifth grader at Emmons 



School, goal-tender for the team; and 
Matt Jorgenson, a seventh grader at 
Antioch Upper Grade, who plays de- 
fense, were instrumental in first 
helping their team win the Regional 
championship two weeks ago, and 




Marlena Rock Lady 
presents 

15 Of America's 
Best Psychics 



MARLENA'S Stones & Crystals 
Aura Photography 

March 14, 15 - DAYS INN 

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•1°* OFF 1 Consultation w/Ad 



The Kenosha Komets Pee Wee C team celebrate after they won 
the Wisconsin State Hockey Championship. The team features 
two players from Antioch— goaltender Ben Bergmann, and de- 
fender Matt Jorgenson. — Submitted photo 



then State championship. While Jor- 
genson's defensive play was stellar in 
the regional playoffs, the team lost 
his services in the finals when he 
sprained a shoulder during the First 
period of the opening game against 
Mosinee. Bergmann, who has a 91 
percent save average for the season, 
stopped 23 of 24 shots to help the 
Komets advance to the semi-finals. 

Ben Bergmann's goal tending 
kept the Komets alive as he made 
numerous game saving stops and to- 
tal of 42 saves to defeat Jancsville 3-2 
in double overtime in the semi-fi- 
nals. Matt Smith and Kyle Anderson 
of Kenosha scored goals for the 
Komets, 

The Championship game found 
the streaking Komets controlling 
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POLICE & FIRE 




Lakeland Newspapers/. A5 



POLICE BEAT 



Persons charged with a crime ore limocent until proven guilty In a court of law. 



ANTIOCH 



DUI 



Antioch Police Officers stopped 
Barbara Lee Ferrel, 42, of 
Mundelein, March 7 at 12:37 a.m. at 
Main and Orchard Street in a black 
1988 Ford convertible. She was 
charged with DUI. She declined the 
offer to take a breathalyzer test. Fer- 
rel posted her drivers license as 
bond and was released on recog- 
nizance pending an April 7 court , 
date in Waukegan. 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
AnneT. McNerney, 37, of Antioch, 
on March '4 at 2:02.a.m. traveling 
southbound on Main Street near 
First Street in a black 1991 Pontiac. 
She was charged with DUI- She de- 
clined the offer to take a breathalyz- 
er test. McNerney posted her dri- 
vers license and $100 for bond 
pending a court dale of April 7 in 
Waukegan. 

Warrant Arrest . 

Antioch Police Officers 
stopped Joseph M. Schanes, 51, 
of Antioch, March 9 at 1:18 a.m. 
in the rear parking lot of the 800 
block of Main Street. He was 
wanted on a Lake County Sheriffs 
Department warrant. Schanes 
was unable to post bond. He was 
transported to the Lake County 
Jail at 9 a.m. 



Revoked license 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
Jaime Bonilla, 26, of Round Lake 
Beach, on March 8 at 7:14 a.m. at '• 
Main and Poplar Streets in a silver 
1987 Pontiac Grand Am. Bonilla 
was charged with not having a rear 
registration plate light and driving 
with a revoked license. Bonilla was 
released on $100 cash bond pend- 
ing an April 8 court date at 9 a.m. in 
Waukegan. 

Warrant arrest 

Antioch Police Officers stopped 
Travis W. McConnaghy, 20, of 
McHenry, on March 8 at 1:55 a.m. 
traveling northbound on Route 83 
north of North Avenue as a passen- 
ger in an automobile. He was 
charged with illegal transportation 
of alcohol by a passenger and pos- 
session of alcohol by a'minor. He 
was released on personal recog- 
nizance pending an April 22 court 
date at 10:30 a.m. in Grayslake. Mc- 
Connaghy was taken to the Lake 
County Jail for the warrant arrest. 
He was released on a $10,000 recog- 
nizance bond on the warrant 
charge pending a March 20 court' 
date at 9 a.m. In Waukegan. 

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vestigating two recent thefts that 
were reported on March 2. 

On Thursday, Feb. 26 at 7 p.m., 
survey instruments were taken 
from an area about 500 feet west of 
Painted Lakes Drive as a surveyor 
worked nearby on Grass Lake Road, 
Equipment was taken while it was 
unattended but being used for sur- 
veying. Missing equipment includ- 
ed a tribach, a prism, an adapter, 
and a tripod. The value was esti- . 
mated to be $600. 

A computer donated to Calvary 
Christian School two months ago 
has been reported missing. The 
computer and mdnitor were esti- 
mated to be worth $1 ,599. There 
were no signs of forced entry. 

Underage driver 

Lake Villa Police Officers 
stopped an underage driver, 16, of 
Antioch, on March 2 at 12:50 a.m. ' 
traveling south bound on Cedar 
Lake Road near Route 132 in a blue 
1990 Chevrolet Lumina. The driver 
was charged with not having a valid 
drivers license, violation of restric- 



tions related to vision correction, 
and violation of curfew. A passen- 
ger, 16, of Antioch, was also charged 
with a curfew violation. They were 
assigned a court date of April 8 at 3 
p.m. in Grayslake. 



UNDENHURST 

No valid license 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Richard J. Schrimpf, 18, of 
Lake Villa, on March 3 at 5:24 p.m. 
traveling west bound on Route 132 
near Hawthorn Drive in a blue Ford 
Escort. He was charged with im- 
■ proper display of registration, not 
having insurance, and not having a 
valid drivers license. Schrimpf was 
released on personal recognizance 
pending a court date of April 1 in 
Grayslake. 

Minors with alcohol 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Shane D. Fieider, 18, of 
Antioch, on March 7 at 1:33 a.m. at 



Route 132 and Mallard Ridge Drive 
in a red Chevrolet. He was 
charged with not having a front 
registration plate and given a no- 
tice to appear for being a minor in 
possession of alcohol. Passenger, 
Rodney F.DuPont, 18, of Linden- 
hurst, was given a notice to appear 
for being a minor consuming alco- 
hol. He took a breathalyzer test 
(0.09). Both were released on their 
own recognizance pending an 
April 1 court date. 

DUI 

Lindenhurst Police Officers 
stopped Robert A. Nyberg, 43, of 
Niles, on March 4 at 1:39 a.m. at 
Route 45 south of Sand Lake Road 
in a white truck. He was charged 
with speeding, improper lane use, 
open transportation, improper use 
of registration, DUI-alcohol, and 
DUI above 0.08. He took a breatha- 
lyzer test (0.09). Nyberg was re- 
leased on S300 bond pending a 
court date of April 14 at 9 a.m. in 
Waukegan. 



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A6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 13, 1998 




Mortensen: experience to can 




By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



W. C. Petty students Peter Scheidt, left, and Katie Hofeldt stand 
before a mural created to show aspects of fifth grade life. 

Mural travels around town 



Posters on display recently in 
downtown store windows were cre- 
ated by fifth grade students at W.C. 
Petty School after a semester of art 
classes. 

"Each mural represents their 
home and family, community, and 
school and education, as well as 
the future," said Principal Tim Ma- 
harfy. 

The posters were placed on dis- 



play at the Antioch Post Office on Or- 
chard Street and Brans Nut Compa- 
ny at 935 Main Street. 

"The volunteer staffed art pro- 
gram presents lessons to one half of 
the students for one semester while 
the others participate in the school's 
D.A.P.E. program," Mahaffysaid. 

D.A.R.E. is a drug education pro- 
gram for students. — by Kenneth 
Patcheh 



Michael J, Mortensen seeks to 
bring his past Lake County public 
service to decisions that come before 
the Lake County Board. Today he is 
working to be elected District I Lake 
County Board representative. 

"I am running for the county 
board because I believe I can 
make a significant contribution 
based on my knowledge gained in 
the past 28 years," he said. He 
cites his experience within the 
Lake County criminal justice sys- 
tem and knowledge of budget op- 
erations as a basis for views on 
how costs can be contained and 
public safety maintained. 

Mortensen intends to serve as 
District 1 representative as a volun- 
teer if elected to the county board. 
He has pledged that if elected he will 
not accept a salary or benefits for the 
position. "I am already receiving one 
public pension," he said. 

In December, Mortensen retired 
as Chief of Administrative Services 
for the Circuit Court, He had also 
served as a Probation Officer and 
Chief Probation Officer in Lake 
County. As Chief of Administrative 




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Services he was in charge of budget 
operations and had knowledge of the 
criminal justice system, the courts, 
and judicial finances. 

Currently he serves as Vice-Pres- 
ident of the Antioch Public Library 
District Board. He has been a trustee 
with the library since 1989. 

"One of the most serious issues 
facing the district is the lack of prop- 
er sewage treatment in the unincor- 
porated areas of the district," he said. 

"I believe that the property own- 
ers in the district should have a 
chance to vote on whether or not 
they would like to participate in pro- 
jects to bring sewer as well as ade- 
quate water service to their areas," 
he said. 

Mortensen recognizes the high 
costs to provide sewer and waterser- 
viccs to unincorporated areas and 
would work to help people cope with 
the costs for such improvements if 
that were to become necessary. He 
thinks that 50-year financing bonds, 
attachments to utility lines built by 
developers for their projects, and 
even reverse mortgages for elderly 
people on fixed incomes could be ex- 
plored for ways to make economic 
impacts less severe for people. 

"I would work within the struc- 



ture of the county board to bring this 
matter to referendum," he said. 

Mortensen has mixed views on 
tax increases. "I support a gasoline 
tax if some of the funds are dedicat- 
ed to improving and expanding pub- 
lic transportation," he said. 

"I do not think a new (county) 
jail should be built without ex- 
ploring alternative strategies such 
as day reporting and expanded 
pre-trail supervision," Mortenson 
continued. 

Mortensen is a life-long Anti- 
och resident. He is a member of the 
885 Civic Club, the Antioch Moose, 
the Northern Illinois Conservation 
Club, the Lakes Region Historical So- 
ciety, and is currently the Treasurer 
of Sequoit Lodge //027. 

Mortensen attended the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, Milton College, 
and Northern Illinois University. 
He also attended John Marshall 
Law school for two years, but did 
not graduate. - 

"I am known to the voters, at- 
tended Antioch public schools, 
and. am a lifetime resident of the 
district," he said. "I am a serious 
candidate for the county board, 
and, if elected, I will give it my 
full-time effort." 



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NEIGHBORS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 



Pedersen plugs for board, 
cites community work 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



People in Antioch Township 
know Linda Pedersen or know about 
her because of her community work. 
Her impact on the District 1 area has 
emerged from almost two decades 
worth of her active personal invest- 
ment in the community. 

Linda Pedersen now seeks elec- 
tion to the Lake County board as the 
District 1 representative to replace 
incumbent Judy Martini. 

"I would like to bring to this po- 
sition the quality of honest and fair 
representation to all the residents of 
District 1," said Pedersen. 

"Having been very active for the 
past 16 years in my community, and 
having taken active rolls in various 
forms of service to my community, I 
feel that I am in touch with the spirit 
of this community and have a feel for 
the direction our residents would 
like to see us go/' she said. 

If the spirit of the Antioch area is 
volunteer activity, as many claim, 
she may be one of its strongest 
champions. For almost two decades, 
she has invested herself in activities 
that range from school board service 
to an Allendale School mentoring 
program to serving with an organi- 
zation to identify bone marrow 
donors. She can speak quite directly 
to political issues, however. 

"Growth is our biggest issue at 
this point. Along with growth comes 
traffic congestion, crowded schools 
and higher taxes," she said. "We 
need to take a step back and take a 
good look at the projected growth 
that is facing our community and ask 
ourselves if we realistically can han- 
dle it." 

Pedersen is concerned about in- 
frastructure capacity, the need for 
new schools, impacts on the envi- 
ronment, tax burden issues for resi- 
dents, and the role for impact fees 
from developers. She also wants to 
look at incentives to attract new in- 
dustries to Lake County. 

She said that she would apply 
her own careful consideration to 
Forest Preserve District bond is- 
sues. 

"Presently, I would not support 
another (Forest Preserve District) 
bond referendum for open space," 
Pedersen said. However, were coun- 
ty residents to favor such a referen- 
dum, she would be willing to reeval- 
uate her position. 

"I may change my position," she 
said. "However, I would not support 
all the money to be used to purchase 



OntuiK 




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open space, I would want to see a 
portion of it used for development of 
our preserves." 

"Also, when purchasing Forest 
Preserve property, we need to be 
looking at wooded areas, wetlands, 
and others which are conducive to 
Forest Preserves." 

Pedersen has received endorse- 
ments from many area political lead- 
ers. " 

"Of the many volunteer activities 
I have been involved in for the past 
16 years, I have to say St. Peters Foot- 
lights is one of my favorites," Peder- 
sen said. "This fund raiser started in 
1982 in order to raise funds to help 
keep St. Peters school open. I have 
served on the steering committee 
since 1985 and have watched it grow 
from a parish event into a communi- 
ty event" 

She is presently serving as Presi- 
dent of Antioch Rotary Club. She is 
also a Board member of the Antioch 
Community Consolidated Grade 
School District 34 Education Foun- 
dation. The foundation is dedicated 
to raising funds for special programs 
in technology and fine arts for the 
district schools. 

In 1986, Pedersen was a founder 
of the Antioch Junior Women's Club. 
She has been active in it ever since as 
a member and has served as treasur- 
er and president. 

Pedersen has continued to 
work with the Illinois General Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs. "This 
gave me the opportunity to travel 
the whole state of Illinois and visit 
with the different clubs and round 
table discussions and bring ideas 
back to our community. It's been a 
great experience," she recently told 
Antioch Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry officials. 

Pedersen told Chamber officials, 
"I would also bring to the position 
strong leadership and organization- 
al skills and the enthusiasm that I 
think is needed to be a quality repre- 
sentative of District 1." 




NEIGHBORS 

Name: Karen Georgeson 

Home: I have lived in Antioch for the 
past 25 years. 

Occupation: Human Resource at Ja- 
ms Plastics in Antioch full-time, and 
part-time I teach cake decorating class- 
es at Hannah's Home Accents (formerly 
the Ben Franklin Store). 

I'm originally from: Chicago. 

I graduated from: National Lewis 
University. 

My family consists of: My two sons, Scott, 11, and Nick, 9. 

My pets are: A shark named Sharky. 

What I like best about Antioch: The small town atmosphere is 
what I appreciate most. 

What I like best about my job: Working with all different types 
ofpeople. 

The secret to my success is: Respect for others, determina- 
- tion, hard work, long days, and a lot of coffee to keep me going. 

My perfect day in Antioch would be: A hot sunny day at one 
of our beautiful beaches soaking up the sun with all of my friends. 

Last book I read: "The Road Less Traveled" by Dr. Scott Peck. 

Favorite "TV show Is: "Fraiser" and "Jerry Springer"— that show 
is hysterical. 

Favorite video is: Home videos of when my children were little. 

Favorite movie Is: "Dirty Harry" and "Mr. Holland's Opus." 

Favorite restaurant: Dover straits 

Favorite band or musician: Pearl Jam and Roberta Flack. 

My life's motto Is: I'll get enough sleep when I am dead. 

If I won the lottery, 1 would: Pack up my family and friends 
and take a well deserved vacation cruising the Caribbean sipping 
frozen exotic drinks with little umbrellas. Then, I would have to buy a 
black 1995 Firebird Convertible. 

My greatest accomplishments are: Teaching my children to 
love. 

I want to be remembered as: A good mother, a good person, 
and a strong woman. 

My pet peeve is: Disorganization and a lack of motivation. 

If I could meet anyone, I would meet: Clint Eastwood. I have 

one wall in my house reserved just for Clint memorabilia. 

My dream Job would be: Teaching psychology at the University 
of the West Indies. 

People would be most surprised to know this about me: 

That I play electric guitar and keyboards. 

If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in 
this column, call Rhonda Hetrick Burke at 223-8161. 



I 



Michael J. Mortensen 

Lake County Board 
District 1 

PUNCH lOl 

Paid for by Citizens for Mortensen 





*_-—■:.*■♦ \f I *»+(. — i 




Calendar 



Friday, March 13 

7 p.m. Swing Street Cafe, south 
gym, ACHS, $6/adults, $3/students 

Saturday, March 14 

On this date In 1918: 
As seen in the Antioch News - 
"Sequoit Lodge #827 A.F. and 
A.M. is at lastto have a perma- 
nent home made possible through 
the efforts of the Antioch Masonic 
Temple Association" 

7 a.m.-2 p.m. Women's Health 
Day at Provena St. Therese Med- 
ical Center, 2615 Washington St., 
Waukegan, presented by St. 
Theresa's and the Business and 
Professional Women of Lake Coun- 
ty, adm. $5/$10 for lunch reserva- 
tion, call 244-7469 for gen. info, 
or 945-1413 for exhibits 

10 a.m.-4 p.m. Lake County 
March Arts & Craft Show at the 
Lake County Fairgrounds, U.S. 45 
& Rte. 120 in Grayslake, $2 adm. ( 
info, at 223-1433, Sun. also 

10 a.m. Page : A-Day Writer's 
Group at Salem Community 
Library, info, at 414-843-3517 

Sunday, March 15 

7-9 p.m. Open Gym at ACHS for 
adults 18 and over, cost is $2 

Monday, March 16 

12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center, info, at 395-7120 

6 p.m. Police and Rre Commission 
at village hail 

7 p.m. Partnership for Education 
Group meeting, ACHS Library * 

7:30 p.m. Lakes Area Community 
Band, ACHS, info, at 395-5566 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Village Board of 
Trustees meets at village hall 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Coin Club 
meets at Antioch Public Library 

Tuesday, March 17 

9-11 a.m. Blood Pressure Screen- 
ing, Antioch Piggjy Wiggjy 

6:30-8:30 p.m. High School Boys 
Basketball, at Ant". Evang, Church 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
refreshments available, doors 
open at 4:30 p.m.- Call 395-5393 

7 p.m. School Board meeting, 
Grass Lake Dist. #36, at school 

7:00-8:00 p.m. Weigh to Win pro- 
gram at Calvary Christian Center, 
Monaville Rd., 356-6181 for info. 

Wednesday, March 18 

9 a.m. - Noon Antioch United 
Methodist Church holds Parents 
Day Out, call 395-1362 

5-8 p.m. Community Open House 
hosted by First National Bank- 
Employee Owned, 485 Lake Street 

7 p.m. Antioch Park Board meets 
at village hall 

7 p.m. Winter Sports Awards 
Program, auditorium, ACHS 

Thursday, March 19 

All day seminar, "Marketing Your 
Small Business," at CLC, hosted 
by Grayslake Economic Develop- 
ment Commission and State Bank 
of the Lakes, info, at 548-2700 

6 p.m. TOPS Weight Loss meets at 
Antioch Manor Apts., 395-8143 

7:30 p.m. District 117 School 
Board meeting at ACHS 

GOT SOMETHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
Ask for Cristina Feindt • 
223-8161, ext. 104. 



mm* 

■ 



A8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 13,1998 



i 



i 



Martini seeks re-election to board 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



County Board member Judy 
Martini (Dist, 1-Antioch) works to 
represent the people, to promote 
the unique economy of die Chain of 
Lakes region, and to protect the nat- 
ural resource base upon which her 
district is dependent for its charac- 
ter. She has also invested many 
rewarding hours helping children at 
Camp Duncan YMCA. 

"I am seeking re-election to the 
County Board because District 1 is 
facing many-serious decisions as we 
enter the new millennium," she 
said. "Witlr the Village of Antioch 
projections of tripling in population 
by the year 2010, it is not a good 
time for a novice entering onto the 
county Board seat." 

Martini presents herself as a 
candidate of the people and pledges 
to represent them. "I have proven 
time and time again that my heart is 
with the people," she said. She said 
that she has honored her commit- 
ment to be free of the machine poli- 
tics that people did not like in (he 
district when they voted for her in 
1994. 

"They wanted a voice in their 
government. I have proven that I am 



nobody's 'yes man' and that I vote 
the conscience of the taxpayers," 
she said. 

She intends to continue to rep- 
resent the people. The Forest 
Preserve is currently polling county 
residents about the issue of further 
district acquisitions. "If the public 
supports further acquisitions, then I 
will support their wishes, and the 
people know I will stand by my 
word." 

"Over 1,500 acres of open space 
has been acquired since I have been 
on the board, all through willing 
sellers or land donations." 

Martini highlights the impor- 
tance of the tourism industry to the 
area's economy. "Since District 1 is 
heavily dependent on tourism for 
our tax base, 1 have brought a cer- 
tain expertise to the Lake County 
Board with my familiarity of the 
Lake County's crown jewel, (lie 
Chain of Lakes." She said that this 
representation had been missing 
previously^ 

"It is also imperative that I 
remain on the (Lake County 
Board's) Law and Judicial 
Committee to ensure the safe 
recreational use of our lakes and 
waterways since western Lake 
County is heavily dependent on 



tourism," she said. 

Martini has served as a Board 
member of the Fox River Watershed 
Management Board and the Fox 
River Ecosystem Partnership Board. 
She is a member of the Northern 
Illinois Conservation Club. She was 
also the founder of ARC— Against 
Riverboat Casinos. 

Martini is a member of the 
County Board's Building and 
Zoning Committee and the Forest 
Preserve District's Land Acquisition 
Committee. 

Martini is proud to work with 
the county on its new Unified 
Development Ordinance. "I am 
proud to say that I helped draft the 
natural resource protection section 
of our new UDO to further protect 
shorelines and wetlands." 

"The most fulfilling and favorite 
volunteer activity 'that I've under- 
taken is Director of the YMQ\ Camp 
Duncan," said Martini. 

"The Burn Victim Day camp, 
which is put on every year at the 
YMCA, allows burn victim children 
the opportunity and freedom to 
play, swim, and socialize with other 
children facing the same chal- 
lenges," Martini said. 

Martini is also a member of 
Women of the Moose. 




good health is important 




January - March^ 199& 




7 • 
if 



£*■<>>% < i\ 



"/■ ■ - 



t. a . : :;■■■-. 

w? ■-■■ 

Osteoporosis Screening 

(out-of-pocket expenses) 






Let 



help you stay 



We try to eat right, exercise and get regular 
check ups. But that isn't always enough. 
Early detection is the best way to prevent 
the crippling effects of Osteoporosis. That's 
why Mom talked to her doctor and was 
referred to Victory for a baseline bone 
densitometry screening*." 

Victory Memorial Hospital 
wants to help! 

Victory knows how important it is for 
women over 40 to talk to their doctor 
about Osteoporosis -- a bone-weakening 
disease that causes bones to break easily 
and can lead to deformity. 

Start out the new year 
right with Victory. 

During January, February and March 
we're offering up to $50 off of any 
out-of-pocket expenses for our premium, 
CT-based Osteoporosis test. 

Depending on your insurance coverage 
you may not have to pay anything! 

Call your doctor today to ask if you 
should take advantage of this great offer 
for a low-cost osteoporosis screening. 

For more information about the test 
and a list of risk factors, call Victory's 
Community Relations Department at: 

1-800-THE-CHOICE 

(1-800-843-2464) 




Victory 

Memorial 

Hospital 



: 







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■?:.•■:• •;■.:■,;::■: 



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1324 N. Sheridan Road 
Waukcgan, Illinois 60085 

*Bone Densitometry is a painless, CT-based 
scan, with 96% accuracy for detecting 
osteoporosis. It takes only JO minutes and is 
covered by Medicare and most other insurance 
plans. Women over 40 should discuss the test 
with their doctor and ask to be referred for a 
baseline screening. 



Antioch is a busy place 



A few upcoming events you 
townsfolks may want to 
be made aware of: First of 
all, the VFW Ladies 
Auxiliary is hosting a "Safety 
Seminar" for the elderly members 
of Antioch and its surrounding 
communities. What this is going to 
entail is a presentation sponsored 
by Ameritech Phone Co. and pre- 
sented by Randy Freeman. Mr. 
Freeman will be discussing the 
many advantages of owning a cel- 
lular phone. 

Once thought of as a novelty for 
those who wanted to feel impor- 
tant, cellular phones are now a 
major safety feature being carried 
in many cars and pocketbooks. 
People feel an amazing sense of 
security with this new modem con- 
venience tucked safely away in the 
event an emergency arises. With all 
the country roads beckoning our 
cars out here in Lake County, it 
always seems we find ourselves fac- 
ing an abandoned stretch of high- 
way when "old Betsy" decides to 
act up or one of the tires pops like a 
balloon hit by a pin. 

Just think how much quicker 
your anxiety will subside when you 
can simply reach over, dial a num- 
ber, and know that help will soon 
be on its way. Ameritech will be 
offering a special rate for any adult 
who is 50 years of age or older. This 
will include a free phorte with free 
activation and a low monthly ser- 
vice fee of only SI 1.95. 

All folks who are 50 years of age 
or older are invited to attend the 
seminar which will be held on 
Wednesday, March 18, at 3 p.m. at 
the VFW Post, 75 North Ave., 
Antioch. For any further informa- 
tion you can call Dorthee at 395- 
6934. The VFW Ladies Auxiliary 
hope to see you there. 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGLE 

Lynn Pringle 



The second event which will be 
here before you know it is the next 
session of Country Line Dance 
lessons offered by the Antioch 
Parks and Recreation Dept. The 
new eight week session begins 
Wednesday, April 8. Classes will be 
held in the gymnasium at Grass 
Like School from 7 until 8:30 p.m. 
Lessons are open to either gender 
and anyone 12 years of age and on 
up. 

As long as you are up and tak- 
ing nourishment, the instructor will 
shuffle you around the floor and 
show you where you need to be 
and which limb you should be 
shaking. The lessons are a load of 
fun with some really swell folks tak- 
ing part. And don't forget, before . 
you "know it the winter blahs will be 
replaced with the summer swelters 
and what better way to trim down 
that winter tummy than a little 
exercise. 

Advanced registration is 
required and may be done at the 
Parks and Recreation Dept. which 
is located in the Village Hall at 874 
Main St. in beautiful downtown 
Antioch. For more information you 
may call the Parks Director, Laurie 
Stab! at 395-2160 or the old retired 
Lizard at 395-5380. 

And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle." 



Readers with information for 
"Jingle from Pringle" should call 
Lynn Pringle at 395-6364. 



Two District #34 teachers needed 



Increasing enrollment and larg- 
er class sizes have created a need for 
two new teachers in Elementary 
School District #34. The positions 
are to be filled as soon as personnel 
are found. 

One teacher will be assigned to 
W. C. Petty School and one to 
Antioch Upper Grade School. 

"We realized that we definitely 
needed to add leaching staff for next 
year, but it was also clear to us that 
the need was just as valid right 
now," said School Board President 
Dr. Earl "Dud" Newton. 

"Essentially, we simply decided 



to add the new teaching staff a few 
months earlier in order to reduce 
some large class sizes now," he said. 

The Antioch C.C. District #34 
Elementary School Board approved 
creation of two new classroom 
teaching positions at its regular 
February meeting. The positions 
will address increasing student, 
enrollments and larger class sizes at 
both schools. 

Newton said that the need for 
additional teachers due to increas- 
ing school enrollments is a condi- 
tion that the district will face for the 
next several years. 




Talking 
Health 



1 



by Dr. Scott Reiser, D.C. 

PROPER BENDING & 
LIFTING 



You have spent all day Saturday ' 
dragging boxes down from the attic in 
preparation for a garage sale. At the 
end of the day you find yourself 
unable to straighten up. Your back 
seems to have congealed into aC 
strange and painful "s" shape. This 
may be the result of using your lower 
muscles when you were lifting and 
bending. Improper bending and lift- 
ing, especially when you arc tired, can 
result in painful back problems. 

Using proper techniques when pick- 
ing up and carrying things can mean 
the difference between a painful and a 
pain-free back. You should use your 
knees and leg muscles to lower the 
body when you arc stooping or lifting 
objects, especially when you arc tired. 



Your chiropractor can show you the 
proper ways to bend and lift and can 
also recommend specific exercises to 
increase the strength and flexibility of 
your spine and the lower back. 

// maintaining your health and 
reducing stress is important to you, 
call Round Lake Beach Chiropractic 
at 847-740-2800 to make an initial, 
no obligation consultation with Dr. 
Scott G. Reiser, Dr. Reiser has 
served the Lake and McHenry 
County area for over 10 years. Let 
his knowledge and experience serve 
you. Dr. Reiser's clinic is located at 
314 Rollins Road, Round Lake 
Beach (Eagle Creek Plaza - comer 
of Cedar Lake and Rollins Roads.) 



Remember - March is "ChiroCare Month 



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THE 
CUPBOARD 

Guest Columnist: 
Steve Peterson 



Three-pointers 
give reporter 
hoop hopes 

For many a basketball fan, 
March Madness is The time 
of year. In most years, the 
best teams rise their level to 
play at Northwestern University's 
super-sectional with a chance at 
Elite Eight status at stake. Every 
once in awhile, a Cinderella team 
has a chance, but not since 1 6-team 
seeding. 

For me, one of the most pres- 
sure-filled but enjoyable moments 
is the three-point shoot at Warren 
Township High School. 

The past few years, I have been 
fortunate enough to be able to par- ' 
ticipate in such a shootout. - 

Before the Feb, 28th event, it 
was time to ask an expert about 
three-point shooting, Warren's 
Chuck Breuscher. 

"It is all about confidence — 
thinking you can make it. If you 
square up, you can feel like you will 
make it," he said. 

Breuscher should know. 

His three-point talents have at- 
tracted box-and-one defenses; He 
has been shooting three's since his 
dad extended the driveway and ear- 
lier at his Warren Township home. 

Breuscher and the rest of the 
Blue Devils were working hard to 
guard against a first-round let- 
down such as last year when 
Carmcl almost upended them. 

"We don't have many people 
. back from last year, so we remind 
them of what could happen. We 
looked past Carmel last year," said 
Breuscher. 

By the way, he was schooled fn 
the trey by Darnel Foster and Joel 
Dangcl. 

WTHS entered the post-season 
party winners of six-of-eight and 
seeded second to mighty Zion-Ben- 
ton. Wauconda was the first-round 
foe for Warren. 

Anyway, Saturday came at the 
new Almond Road gym. After all, 
the players-mostly reserves, had 
their say, and starters shot, long 
range for fun, it was my turn. 

I nervously approached the first 
rack, five and one-half months after 
a foot injury sidelined this would-be 
player. After one on the first rack, I 
made two from the top-of-the-key. 
My biggest obstacles: the 45 second 
clock (ably kept by Ron Krapf), and 
the three-point line must be grow- 
ing as I get older. 

it was a 3-of- 15 day. Not any- 
thing to notify the Bulls about, but I 
did beat one player, whom we will 
not embarrass. It was the second- 
best attempt in four years, though. 

As in warm-ups earlier in the 
week, one basketball coach suggest- 
ed it would be best to stick with the 
notepad and computer. 

There was some success on the 
court that week. With a witness on 
hand, I made 28 straight free 
throws. The key: fading to your left. 



Brendan O'Neill can be reached at 
(847)223-8161, ext.J32;fax (847) 
223-8810; or e-mail at edit@tnd.com. 



MORE 

LOCAL 

SPORTS 

PAGE A4 




March 13, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers /A9 




wins reg 




By BRENDAN O'NBLL 
Sports Editor 



The Antioch boys basketball 
team achieved one of it's goals last 
week, winning the Regional title and 
advancing to the semi-finals of the 
Waukegan Sectional. The Sequoits 
outlasted the Libertyville Wildcats in 
a 65-62 overtime thriller. 

"Going into the season, I gave 
my goals to the kids, and so far we've 
gotten one of them," said Antioch 
coach Jeff Dresser. 

The Sequoits were a pretty con- 
sistent team all year— that is, as soon 
as Chris Groth recovered from an 
early-season foot injury. 

Groth led the team with 23 
points, including two key free throws, 
in the extra period. 

Antioch began the game with a 
strong first quarter, both on the of- 
fensive and defensive ends of the 
floor. The Sequoits led 14-11 after 
one period. 

But the Wildcats stormed back, 
climbing their way up to a 44-39 lead 
entering the fourth quarter, thanks to 
big buckets by Brian Hamlett (19 



points} and 6-7 center Jim Oboikow- 
itch (17 points, 12 rebounds). 

In overtime, the two teams bat- 
tled tough for the entire four-minute 
period. After a free throw by Groth to 
make the score 62-59, Libertyville's 
junior guard Ryan Schreen calmly 
nailed a three-pointer to tie the game 
with under 30 seconds left to play. 

Groth drove and hit a leaning 
jumper with :05 seconds remaining, 
and went to the line leading 64-62. 
He hit the 'gimme' and LHS missed 
on their final three-point attempt. 

The huge win matches Antioch 
with a powerful Waukegan team that 
is coming off a win over Warren— the 
other co-number two In the NSC. 

Waukegan faced Antioch 
Wednesday night, but at press time 
the results were not available. 

In the other bracket of the Sec- 
tional, Mundelein faced favorite 
Zion-Benton, and the Mustangs fell_^ 
83-60 to the seemingly-unstoppable" 
Zee-Bees. 

If Antioch advances, the Se- 
quoits will play Zion-Benton Friday 
night at 7:30 p.m. at Waukegan High 
School. 



Rams need plenty 
of pitching in FVG 



Pitching figures to be the 
strength of the Grayslake Rams as 
they head into the uncharted waters 
of the Fox Valley Conference. 

Senior Dave Weber, anchors the 
talented staff, according to coach 
Sean Ferrell. 

"Dave will get the ball on open- 
ing day. He has worked hard all win- 
ter. He has cut down his number of 
pitches. He is up consistently at 81- 
82 MPH. He has gained a lot more 
confidence - he is not just throwing," 
said Ferrell. 

The Rams have a 17-player ros- 
ter seven seniors and 10 juniors. 

"The key will be team chemistry 
- how the juniors mesh with the se- 
niors. I met with each player indi- 
vidually and we met Saturday as a 
team. We set some realistic goals. We 
want to be respectable in the Fox 
Valley,'' said Ferrell. 

Eric Spaw, a pitcher and.catcher, 
and catcher Joe Kane are back for 
their third varsity season. 

Seniors back in baseball include 
pitcher Ryan Unger and Tony Miret- 



ti and Larry Noble,' an lnfielder. 

"We have a good group of ju- 
niors," said Ferrell. 

These Include pitcher Adam 
Bergerin; outfielder Alex Frank; out- 
fielder Mike Beverley; Matt Ellison, 
football team's quarterback who has 
been a "pleasant surprise". 

"The pitchers have been working 
hard on their mechanics Tuesday, 
Thursday and Saturday and we run 
drills the other days. Having a big 
field house really helps us. We use 
the small gym for hitting and use the 
larger gym for drill work," said Fer- 
rell. 

He said the Rams are looking for- 
ward to the new league. Judging by 
the past, Cary-Grove and McHenry 
maybe the pre-season favorites. 

Adding depth to the Rams will 
be: juniors infielder Brett Skelly; out- 
fielder, first baseman and pitcher Joe 
Stopka; first baseman and pitcher 
Josh Parmaski; outfielder Ed Musni, 
who will "play a lot"; third baseman 
and outfielder Keith Hall, and senior 
NickVlahos. 



Sequoits preparing for success 
on diamond after roundball 



No doubt about it, boys bas- 
ketball is certainly the talk of An- 
tioch. 

The Sequoits are back in the sec- 
tional semifinal for the first time 
since 1995. For a handful of Sequoits, 
that means baseball season willhave 
to wait. 

"It is a double-edged sword. You 
feel good that they are still in it and 
hope they keep winning, but you 
would like to coach them, too," said 
ACHS coach Paul Petty. 

Shortstop Chris Groth, No. 1 
pitcher Mike Nielsen, Ryan Cluttz 
and Patrick Straub arc on the region- 
al champion hoops team. 

"If Mike picks up where he left 
off in the summer, he will be just 
fine. He came a long ways last year," 
said Petty of Nielsen. 

Catcher Reggie Hughes is back 



with his potent bat as is infielder 
George Fuchs. 

"Our outfield should be young," 
said Petty. 

Senior center fielder Adam 
Bubash anchors that group. 

"On defense, we have some op- 
tions depending on who pitches. We 
can make some chess moves," said 
Petty. 

The Sequoits were 18-17 a year 
ago, but know the North Suburban 
Conference will be a tough loop this 
spring. 

Speaking of spring, the season 
opener with Wauconda on March 21 
looked less likely with the comeback 
of winter. 

"The key this year will be if the 
pitchers step up or not," said Petty as 
he readied for his sixth year at the 
helm. 




A-pfus effort 

Top: Josh White shows his support for the Sequoits* boys team. 
Bottom: Chris Groth cuts down the net after the Sequoits' 65-62 
win.— Photos by Steve Young 

All-Stars win Olympic silver 



Feb. 8, the All-Stars played two 
games at the Northeast III. Special 
Olympic District Tournament in 
Deerfield. The first game was played 
against Indian Prairie Blue, the All- 
Stars walked away from the first 
game with a 73/44 victory. Robert B. 
was the leading scorer with 22 
points, some other high scorer were: 
Renaldo B. with 16 points and both 
Chris Petersen and Christian Torres 
with 10 points apiece. The game was 



a good match of skills and provided 
excellent competition. 

The All-Stars competed in an in- 
tense second games against SRARL- 
Zion. The challenging game ended in 
a 46/56 loss to Zion. Christian Torres 
displayed an outstanding perfor- 
mance scoring 25 of the 46 points. 
The All-Stars won the silver medal in 
the regional tournament. 

For more information, call Julie 
Martin at 360-460. . 




A-plus effort 

Top: Josh White shows his support for the Sequoits' boys team. 
Bottom: Chris Groth cuts down the net after the Sequoits' 65-62 
win. — Photos by Steve Young 



ATHLETE OF 
THE WEEK 

Name: Chris Groth 

School: Antioch 

Sport: Basketball 

Yean Senior 

Last week's stats: Scored 23 points in Antioch 's 65 ■ 

62 OT win over Libertyville in Waukegan Sectional 




Groth 



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HJWHIil <■>*<! In* Hi' n ii ■ im r 1 1 • 



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A10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPORTS 



YOUTH ICELESS HOCKEY ASSOCIATION 



Wins Losses Tics Points 




Coyotes 


8 


1 


16 


Kings 


5 I 3 13 


Grade 1-2 










Oilers 


7 


2 


14 


Blackhawks 


G 3 0' 12 


Western Conference 








Moose 


6 


1 1 


13 


Canucks 


5 4 1 11 


Wolves 


7 





i 


15 


Stars5 


3 


K 


\ 


Avalanche 


4 2 3 11 


Sharks 


6 


2 





12 


Vipers 


4 


4 1 


9 


Hurricanes 


'4508 


Hurricanes 


6 


2 





12 


Blackhawks 


4 


4 1 


9 


Flames 


3 3 2 8 


Blackhawks 


6 


2 





12 


Ducks 


4 


4 1 


9 


Redwings 


2 3 4 8 


Avalanche 


5 


2 


i 


11 


Redwings 


4 


5 


8 


Mapleleafs 


3 5 17 


Oilers 


5" 


2 


i 


11 


Blues 


3 


3 2 


8 


Moose 


3 G 1 7 


Coyotes 


5 


3 





10 


Jets 3 


5 


1 7 




Ducks 


16 3 5 


Canucks 


4 


4 





8 


Mapleleafs 


2 


5 1 


5 


Sharks 


2 7 4 


Redwings 


3 


3 


2 


8 


Sharks 


2 


7 


4 


Vipers 


2 8 4 


Vipers 


3 


5 





G 


Kings 


1 


6 2 


4 


Blues 


9 11 


Flames 


3 


5 





6 


Canucks 


1 


6 1 


3 


Eastern Conference 


Blues 


2 


4 


1 


5 


Flames 


1 


7 


2 


Admirals 


8 1 16 


Moose 


2 


5 


1 


5 


Wolves 


1 


8 


2 


Capitals 


7 2 14 


Ducks 


1 


6 


1 


3 


Eastern Conference 






Grizzlies 


6 1 2 14 


Mapleleafs 





7 


1 


1 


Sabres 


8 


I 


16 


Canadiens 


6 1 2 14 


Kings 














Islanders 


6 


1 2 


14 


Sabres 


4 1 4 12 


Eastern Conference 








Capitals 


6 


2 1 


13 


Thunder 


4 3 2 10 


Flyers 


7 





1 


15 


Nordiques 


G 


2 1 


13 


Panthers 


1 3 2 10 


Nordiques 


7 


1 





14 


Rangers 


6 


2 


12 


Islanders 


4 4 19 


Whalers 


5 


1 


2 


12 


Bruins 


5 


2 2 


12 


Whalers 


3 3 3 9 


Bruins 


5 


2 


1 


11 


Whalers 


5 


2 2 


12 


Lightning 


3 4 3 9 


Grizzlies 


5 


3 





10 


Cyclones 


4 


2 2 


10 


Dragons 


3 4 2 8 


Lightning 


4 


2 


2 


10 


Flyers 


4 


3 1 


9 


Penguins 


3 6 17 


Islanders 


4 


3 


1 


9 


Canadiens 


3 


3 3 


9 


Flyers 


3 6 6 


Thunder 


4 


3 


1 


9 


Penguins 


4 


4 


8 


Bruins 


3 6 6 


Rangers 


4 


3 


1 


9 


Lightning 


2 


5 1 


5 


Nordiques 


2 7 15 


Sabres 


2 


4 


2 


G 


Thunder 


2 


G 1 


b 


Rangers 


18 13 


Dragons 


2 


4 


2 


6 


Admirals 


2 


6 1 


5 






Panthers 


2 


4 


2 


6 


Panthers 


1 


5 2 


4 


Grades 7-8 




Penguins 


2 


5 


1 


5 


Dragons 


1 


6 1 


3 


Western Conference 


Canadiens 


2 


6 





4 


Senators 


1 


7 


2 


Wolves 


8 1 16 


Capitals 


1 


7 





2 


Grizzlies 





7 2 


2 


Ducks 


7 2 14 


Admirals 


1 


7 





2 


Grade 5-6 








Mapleleafs 
Grizzlies 


6 2 1 13 
5 3 1 11 


Grade 3-4 










Western Conference 






Vipers 


4 4 19 


Western Conference 








Coyotes 


7 


2 


16 


Blackhawks 


3 4 2 8 


Hurricanes 


8 





1 


17 


Oilers 


G 


3 


15 


Redwings 


3 6 6 


Avalanche 


8 


1 





16 


Wolves 


7 


2 


14 


Sharks 

Penguins 

Kings 

Eastern Confcrcnct 


2 6 15 
2 7 4 
16 2 4 




















E 




Youth Sports 








Panthers 
Thunder 
Flyers 


7 2 14 
7 2 14 
7 2 14 




We Want to 


report on 








Rangers 

Cyclones 

Moose 


6 3 12 
5 4 10 






youi 


• local teams 








4 5 8 


Please call Brendan O'Neill at 223-8161 




Bruins 
Lightning 


3 5 17 
3 6 6 




















Dragons 


2 6 15 




















Coyotes 


9 























There's one sure way 
to get your money fast! 




Electronic Filing 





Certain 



antioch 

420 LAKE ST. 
(847)395-6230 

FOX LAKE 

2 W. GRAND AVE. 

(SUITE 106) 

(847) 587-9333 



McHENRY 

51 02 W. ELM 

(815)385-8630 

ROUND LAKE 

629 W. ROLLINS RD. 

(847)546-4862 



HOURS: 

Mon.-Thurs. 9 am - 8 pm 

Fri. & Sat. 9 am - 5 pm; 

Sundays by Appt. 



WAUCONDA 
474-BW, LIBERTY 

(847) 526-8877 




OPTIMA 




March 13, 1998 




IN THE 
TRENCHES 

LEON FILAS versus BRENDAN O'NEILL 




Heart and soul 

With the smell of flowers 
in the air and the view 
of snow melting off the 
roof of the house next 
door from the window where I write, 
my mind wanders. 

Somehow my mind stops at the 
feeling of giddiness I get from think- 
ing about March Madness. 

The view of the ball in the air. 
The thought of the crowd roaring. 
The swish of the net and the squeak 
of the shoes on the hardwood. 
March madness at it's best. 

Not everyone has the same feel- 
ings I do, however. There are people 
who just can't leave well enough 
alone. There are proponents of the 
NCAA tournament. 

They claim that it's not the best 
of the best on the floor. They say 
that some college's shouldn't be 
there or that certain teams don't be- 
long. They want to keep the little 
college's out. 

I believe that these are the 
same people that call fouls in 
blacktop basketball. They are the 
same people that never believed 
the movie "Hoosiers" really hap- 
pened. They are the people who 
believe that stats and numbers are 
more important that emotions and 
heart. 

They are the bad people. 

It's this simple. The teams that 
appear on the sheet of 64, the teams 
that arc playing in the "Big Dance", 
have earned a spot on there. They 
are there because of their record or 
the winning of a tournament. 

They deserve to be on the porch 
with the other dogs in the tourney. 
Whether they're name is Duke or 
North Carolina or Radford or Prairie 
View A&M, they all are there for a 
reason. 

And, in the end, if Duke is real- 
ly the biggest dog on the porch, 
then their first round contest 
against Radford should be a 1000 
to 2 rout. 

You just never know though. 
Every year, a story is passed around 
about how the emotion of a 15 seed 
beat a number 2 seed. 

You never know. Radford could 
be the little dog that knocked the 
"biggest dog on the porch" back to 
the pen. 



Size and strength 

It's time for March Madness in 
the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association (NCAA), and every- 
one has their brackets mapped 
out, showing which teams you pre- 
dict will win, which will lose, and . 
which will become champion. 

Inevitably, as the teams that 
made the "Big Dance" are selected, 
there are a handful of teams that 
have legitimate gripes as to why 
their were left off the list of 64 "cho- 
sen ones" with a chance at a nation- 
al championship. 

Currently, the winners of each 
end-of-ycar conference tournament 
automatically earn spots in the tour- 
nament. But is this right? 

Teams that make the field as 
conference tourney champs arc 
schools like Radford, NichoIIs State, 
Navy and Prairie View A&M. Prairie 
View A&M? Last year they won just 
four games and this year they fin- 
ished the regular season with a sub- 
.500 record. Are they one of the best 
64 teams in the country? 

Of course not, but to make the 
conference tournaments worth- 
while, and to ensure they make 
money for the conference schools, 
the conference tourney champs 
earn a spot in the Big Dance. 

If the NCAA was to choose the 
tmly best 64 teams in the nation, 
they would base their decision on 
overall record, conference record, 
strength of schedule, RPI rating, 
etc., over the whole season, not just 
for one four-game stretcli in a con- 
ference tournament created purely . 
as a way to make more money for 
the conference. 

Sure, the conference lourna- . 
ment system gives the little school 
like Prairie View A&M a long-shot at 
the national championship, but no 
No. 16 seed has ever won an NCAA 
tourney gamc.evcr. 

Wouldn't we, the fans, be better 
served seeing "bubble" teams like 
Iowa, Wake Forest, and Ball State 
make the tournamcnL.thcy.play in 
conferences like the ACC and Big- 
Ten, not some rinky-dink confer- 
ence with little or no heavy-weight 
competition. 

Let's have the best 64 teams 
compete in the Big Dance, not the 
best 40, with 24 pretenders 



If you'd like to step into the trenches and discuss an issue with the sjmrts editor, please 
aid Brendan O'Neillat 223-8161 (cxt. 132), or fax to 223-8810. Please include you 
name, phone number, and town in which you live. 





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March 13, 1998 SPORTS Lakeland Newspapers/ A1 1 

Lake Villa football and 
registration soon 




Lake Villa township Youth Foot- 
ball Is a program for the children of 
Lake Villa Township and surround- 
ing areas to play football and cheer- 
lead in an organized league, forages 
8 to 14 as of Sept. 1. 
Registration dates 

Wednesday, March 18; 6 to 8 
p.m. 

Saturday, March 21; 9 a.m. to 1 2 
p.m. 
Late registration dates 

Wednesday, April 15; 6 to 8 p.m. 

Saturday, April 18; 9 a.m. to 12 
p.m. 
Location 

State Bank of the Lakes Com- 
munity Room, 2301 Grand Ave. Lin- 
denhurst. 
Registration fee 

Football-$89. Cheerleading $59. 
Eight levels of play 

Bantam-Maximum age 8; 
weight 70 pounds 

Pec-Wee Gold-Maximum age 
10; weight 60 to 80 pounds. 

Pee Wee Red-Heavy Bantam 
and other Pee-Wce players 

Featherweight Gold-Maximum 
age 12, weight SO to 95 pounds. 

Featherweight Red-Heavy Pee, 
Inexperienced featherweight. 

Lightweight Gold-Maximum 
age 13, maximum weight 1 15 



pounds. 

Lightweight Red-Heavy Feath- 
erweight and Inexperienced Light-' 
weight 

Varsity-Maximum age 14, no 
weight limit except: Non-stripers- 
145 pounds 

Single stripers- 160 pounds 

Double stripers-No limit 

Home games are played at 
Lake Villa township Park. Games 
are on Sundays, starting Aug. 30 to 
Oct. 25. Pee Wee Gold at 9:30 a.m.; 
Featherweight Gold at 11 a.m.; 
Lightweight Gold at 12:30 p.m. and 
Varsity at 2 p.m. All Red teams play 
on Saturday at the same times. 
Bantam games to be determined at 
later date. Practices are normally, 
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thurs- 
day starting Aug. 1. 

At time of registration you will 
need to bring PAYMENT and a COPY 
(to keep on file) of your Birth Certifi- 
cate. Measurements for uniforms 
and equipment will also be taken. 
PLAYERS MUST ATTEND REGIS- 
TRATION. 

We are looking for anyone in- 
terested in coaching football or 
cheerleading. If interested or need 
more information contact Rick 
Johnsen at 356-3267 or John Conway 
at 356- 1264. 



Youth Sports 

We Want to report on your 
. local teams 
Please call 
Brendan O'Neill at 

223-8161 



EXCITING! 
NEW! 

ROTH IRA 

FROM 

PEKIN LIFE 

INSURANCE 
.COMPANY 





Convert your current IRA to a 

Roth IRA in 1998 and 
receive special tax treatment! 

- Tax-free benefits at retirement 

- S2,000 contribution for you and 
your spouse 

Contact your local Pekin Life 

Insurance Company Agent to sec 

if you qualify! 

Timothy H, Osmond, GC 

Osmond Insurance Service ltd, 

976 Hillside 
Anlioch, Illinois 60002 

395-2500 > 




OPEN HOUSEl 

at 

COUNTRY 
MEADOWS 

MONTESSORI SCHOOL 
6151 Washington St., 

Gurnee 
(Washington and Cemetery Rd.) 

Saturday! March 21 5t 
1-3 PM 

Register Now for 
Summer and Fall 1998 

Country Meadows Mon t cssori 

School cordially invites you 

to visit our school, view the 

classrooms, and discuss the 

Montessori program with 

our Directresses. 

Preschool & Kindergarten 
(ages 3-6) 

Elementary Program 
(ages 6-13) 

Before & After School Care 

7:00 AM -6:00 PM 
Available for all enrolled students 

Summer Camp All Programs 
2 - Four Week Sessions 

Call 244-9352 
for details. 

Come For Coffee, 
Sury for Ten Years 




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• Get a 3 YC3t W3tt3nty (1 yr, Arctic Cat &-2Yr. Extended Service Plan) 

• All sleds in stock priced to sell now! 

Some options expire 3/31/98 

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ajs A12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 13, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Midwest 

Woodworking 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 42674 N. 
Lake Ave., Antloch, I L 60002. (847) 
83B-151B. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSONS) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Bruce R. Riley, 42674 N. Lake Ave., 
Anlloch, IL 60002. (847) 838-1518. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify thai the undersigned 
inlend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) of 
the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business is/are correct 
as shown. 
/s/Bruce R. Riley, February 17, 1998 

The foregoing instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by Ihe per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 17th day of February, 1998. 
OFFICIAL SEAL 
/s/Marie Lynn Booth 
Notary Public 
Received: February 17, 1998 
Willard R. Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
0298D-1613-AN 
March 13. 1998 

©ff u°©ur chests 

ft's bfr.c &?£ efihe ten'/? ( 
^^3-8073 




PUBUC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF FILING 

Northern Illinois Gas Company, d/b/a/Ntcor Gas, hereby gives notice to the public thai it 

has filed with the Illinois Commerce Commission on March 2, 1998, testimony and exhibits 

for Docket No. 97-0659, setting forth a reconclllallon of the Company's Gas Supply Cost 

revenues with actual gas costs for 1997. 

Further Information with respect thereto may be obtained either directly from this Com- 
pany or by addressing the Chief Clerk of the Illinois Commerce Commission at Springfield, 
Illinois 62794. 

A copy of ihls Tiling may be inspected by an Interested party at any business office of this 
Company. 

NORTHERN ILLINOIS 

GAS COMPANY 

-K.L Halloran, 

Senior Vice President 

0398A-1631-LV 
March 13, 1998 



TAX DEED NO. 



PUBUC NOTICE 

FILED FEBRUARY 27, 1998 
TAKE NOTICE 
COUNTY OF LAKE. STATE OF ILLINOIS 
DATE PREMISES SOLD DECEMBER 4, 1'995 
SOLD FOR GENERAL TAXES OF 1994 
PIN #06-10-109-013 
THIS PROPERTY HAS BEEN SOLD FOR DELINQUENT TAXES 
Property located at 21 612 W. Engle Dr. Lake Villa. IL 60046 
Permanent Index No. 06-10-109-013 

This notice is to advise you that the above property has been sold for delinquent tax- 
es and that the period of redemption from the sale has been extended and will expire 
on July 2, 1 998. The amount to redeem is subject to increase at 6-monlh intervals from 
the date of sale and may be further increased if Ihe purchaser at the tax sale or his as- 
signee pays any subsequently accruing taxes or special assessments to redeem the 
property from subsequent forfeiture or tax sales. Check with the County Clerk as to the 
exact amount you owe before redeeming. 

This notice is also to advise you that on February 27, 1998, a Petition was filed for 
a lax deed that will transfer title and the right to possession of this property it redemp- 
tion is not made on or before July 2, 1 998. 

This matter is set for hearing before Judge E. Thomas Lang or any judge sitting In 
his stead in Room C 1 50 in the Circuit Court of Lake County, Waukegan, Illinois at 1 :30 
P.M. on July 16, 1998. You may be present at this hearing but your right to redemp- 
tion will have already expired at that time. 

YOU ARE URQEP TO REDEEM IMMEDIATELY TO 

PREVENT LOSS OF PROPERTY 

Redemption can be made at any time on or before July 2, 1998 by applying to the 

County Clerk of Lake County, Illinois at the County Courthouse In Waukegan, Illinois. 
For further information contact Ihe County Clerk 

Attorney for the Petitioner 

Law Oflices of Thaddeus M. Bond, Jr. & Associates, P.C. 

200 N. Ulica St., Suite 203 

Waukegan. IL 60085 

(847)599-9101 

0398A-1643-LV 
March 13, 1998 
March 20, 1998 



PUBUC NOTICE 
LEGAL NOTICE 
Tho following parcels of properly, acquired though the Tax Sale Certificate Program, are 
being offered for sale by Ihe County of Lake. 

Written bids should be submitted to the County of Lake, Tax Extension Dept., Room 1 01 , 
16 N County St„ Waukegan, IL 60085. 

Bids receive will bo retained for 30 days after Ihe Initial bid. After completion of the 30-day 
period the County has the right to accept the highest bid or to reject It If the amount Is Insuf- 
ficient or It tho sate would nol bo In Ihe best Interest of Lake County Taxpayera. 

Willard Rooka Helander 
Lake County Clerk 

INCORPORATED LAKE VILLA ouJSSi- 

38150 N. Sunset Ln. E"8®i£5 

38912 Hickory St. 2KS&SE 

38906 HlckorJ St. M „ Q ^ 02-34-104-008 

36976 N. Terry Dr. West 06-09-201 -002 

36963 N. Lawrence Dr. 06-1 0-1 04-003 

35248 N. Grant Av. m _ ^ J"" 18 - 300 - 012 

18681 W. Roosevelt Rd. 07-18-302-029 
23640 W. Washington Av. 02-32-109-018 

INCORPORATED 1.INPENHURST „ 

2307 Federal Pkwy. 02-26-400-054 

748 Bock Road 02-26-400-055 

229 S Briar Ln. 06-02-214-009 

0398B-1663LV 
March 13, 1998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
LEGAL NOTICE 
The following porcols of property, acquired though Ihe Tax Salo Certificate Program, are 
being offered for sale by Ihe County of Lake. 

Written bids should bo submitted to tho County ol Lako, Tax Extension Dept., Room 101 , 
18 N. County St., Waukegan, IL 60085. 

Bids recetvo will be retained tor 30 days after the initial bid. After complotion of the 30-day 
period, the County has tho right to accept the highest bid or yo reject H if the amount la In- 
sufficient or If the sale would not bo In the best Interest of Lake County Taxpayers. 

Willard Rooks Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
UNINCORPORAT ED ANTIOCH 60002 

25492 W. Clinton Av. 01-24-411-001 

27137 W.FalrviowAv. 01-34-203-011 

271 27 W. Falrvlew Av. 01 -34-203.014 
27140 W. Park Av. ' 01-34-203-025 
27136 W. Park Av. 01-34-203-026 
27 1 32 W. Park Av. 01 -34-203-027 

27128 W. Park Av. 01-34-203028 
22086 W. Sarana Dr. 02-21-405-023 
22080 W. Sarana Dr. 02-21 -405-024 
22257 W. Loon Dr. 02-21-409-017 
26625 W. Cedar St. 01-11-302-014 
26591 W. Cedar St, 01-11-302-017 
42444 N. Willow SI. 01-11-305-003 
42436 N. Willow SI. 01-11 -305-004 
26300 W. Channel Av. 01-26-400-011 
39328 N.Channel Av. 01-26-400-012 
40287 N. Fox Run Ln. 02-20-300-027 

0398B-1660-AN 
March 13, 1998 




Just one per customer, though, 
regardless of how much you spend. 



Valid 3/13/98 - 3/15/98 



d, 






Rts. 120 & 43 .Waukegan, IL • (847) 473-0234 . Open Monday • Friday 10am-8pm . Saturday 10am-5pm . Sunday 11am- 



'■■■'■■' - ■ 



5pm 



■ ., 



tarch 13, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers/ M3 



I 



I 



Sheriff 







°pidi 



Cares 




" * * * H • I 










3 



*• ^t ■% V.i v *.' 






* r > » * x ♦ . -• 



■:::; 



1 s \ i. i * * ■-■■ 



:■■ : • 



Reduction in Serious Crime 

Serious crimes; murder, rape, armed robbery, burglary and theft were 

reduced by 11%. 

Significant Reduction in Fatal 
Accidents 

An aggressive traffic enforcement effort resulted in a 

56% reduction in fatal accidents. 

Record-Breaking Drug Seizures 

Over 1 500 pounds of cocaine, with a street value of over 
1 8.4 million dollars, taken off the streets of Lake County. 

WC Toughest Anti-Gang Programs I 
in Lake County ■ 














YOU HAVE OUR FULL SUPPORT 



• Lake County Republican Chairman John Schulien 

• Lake County Chiefs of Police Association 

• Former U.S. Attorney Fred Foreman 

• Former Sheriff Clinton Grinnell 

• Clerk of the Circuit Court Sally Coffelt 

• Treasurer Jack "Red" Anderson 

• Coronor Barbara Richardson 

• State's Attorney Michael Waller 

• State Representative Andrea Moore 

• Senator William Peterson 
if Senator Adeline Geo-Karis 










Qc^c^G 



INTEGRITY 




VOTE REPUBLICAN 




Uff»myi - 



A14 I Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 13, 1998 




TAX SERVICE 

We Ask The Right Questions 
So You Get The Right Refund 

LOAN ON YOUR 

REFUND IN 2 DAYS 

OR LESS* 

■Refund aniicipation loan if you qualify. Not vafld **» any ccrsr ortw. 



Fully Computerized Income Tax Preparation 



Have You Ever Been To 
Jackson Hewitt? 




PERSONAL TAX PREP FEES' 




» Saturday, March 28, 1998 



Nut; Valid With Any Oilier Offer. 



"This, offer applies to sffl uew customers and those who used a 
different tax preparer in 1997. (Must have a copy of last years' 

tax. rjeJiw-a and proof of payment.) 

• FREE Electronic Filing With All Paid Tax Preparation. 

• Ask About Our FREE Tuition Tax School. 






(847) 740-1099 

Round Lake Beach 
S 23 W: Rollins Rd. 



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(847) 973-1099 

Fox Lake 
23 S. Route 12 




Lakeland Newspapers/RMC Theaters 




Antioch Theatre 
Libertyville Theatre 
McHenry Theatre 
Show Place Theatre, Crystal Like 
Grayslake Outdoor Theatre 
McHenry Outdoor Theatre 
• Dunes Theatre, Zion 



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Libertyville Theatre McHenry Outdoor Theatre | 

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Show Place Theatre, Lake Zurich Theatre 

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Coupon expires March 31, 1998. 



_"The Full Monty" 
_"Good Will Hunting" 
„ W L.A. Confidential" 
"Titanic" 



1 2. BEST ACTOR | 3. BEST ACTRESS 

|_Matt Damon, "Good Will Hunting" | _Hden Bonham Carter, "The Wings Of The Dove' 

| __Robert Duvall, "The Apostle" | Julie Christie, "After Glow" 

= _Peter Fonda, "Uloe's Gold" |_Judi Dench, "Mrs. Brown" 

| _Dustin Hoffman, "Wag The Dog" | _Helen Hunt, "As Good As It Gets" 
5 Jack Nicholson, "As Good As It Gets" I _Kate Winslet, "Titanic" 



4. SUPPORTING ACTOR 1 5. SUPPORTING ACTRESS I 6. BEST DIRECTOR 



_Roberl Forster, "Jackie Brown" S_Kim Basinger, "L.A. Confidential" 

Anthony Hopkins, "Amislad" s Joan Cusack, "In & Out" 

_Greg Kinncar, "As Good As It Gets" |_Minnie Driver, "Good Will Hunting" 

Burt Reynolds, "Boogie Nights" S Julian ne Moore, "Boogie Nights" 

_Robin Williams, "Good Will Hunting" |_Cloria Stuart, "Titanic" 



|_Peter Caltaneo, "The Full Monty" 
|__Gus Van Sant, "Good Will Hunting' 
= _Curtis Hanson, "L.A. Confidential" 
|_Atom Egoyan, "The Sweet Hereafter" j: 



ames Cameron, "Titanic" 



7. ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE | Mail Your Ballot To: ukc,and )i ^^£SSt^i Conlesl 

_"Amislad", John Williams | fsJaniG* 3 ° S * whilncy Sl " Gra y s,akc ' ,L 6003 ° 

„ "Good Will Hunting", Danny Elfman :: * T ■ 

i_ "Kundun", Philip Glass | Address: 

"LA. Confidential", Jerry Goldsmith S phone* 

"Titanic", James Horner 



Ballots postmarked after 3/20/98, will not be accepted. 



* 
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March 13, 1998. 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers! Mo , 





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COMMUNITY 



Marchl3 t 1998 



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ATTRACTIONS 

Round Lake Beach Police Department Kid I.D. Kits 

(Photos & Finger Printing) 

Blood Source Blood Service - Blood Donations • 

Clinic For Dolls & Beanie Babies 
(Physicals For The Toys Of Kids) 

Face Painting • Blood Pressure 
Stress Relaxation Tapes 
Home Health Care Items 
Body Fat Testing • First Aid Kits 
Complementary Guest Classes On Fitness 
Chair Massages • Posture Exams 
Arthritis Screenings 
Diabetes Screenings -Toothbrushes • And Much More! 

DEMONSTRATIONS AND SEMINARS ON: 

Jazzercise • Weight Loss • Laser Hair Removal 
Chiropractic Care • Osteoporosis - Bone Health Care 

And More! 

DONATE BLOOD 

At Lakeland Publishers' Blood Drive 
in conjunction with 

LIFESOURCE Blood Services 

When you give blood you give another birthday, another 

anniversary, another day at the beach, another night under the 

stars, another talk with a friend, another laugh, another hug, 

another chance. GIVE BLOOD • GIVE LIFE! 



Lakeland Publishers, Iric. 

'98 Health and 
Fitness Fair 

FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY 

Saturday, March 28, 1 998 

10:00 am to 3:00 pm 
College of Lake County 

C Module Auditorium 

(Blue Sign in Front of Entrance) 

1 935 1 Washington, Grayslake 



WIN DOOR PRIZES: 

• Gourmet Gift Basket ($100 Value) 

• Gym Bag Filled With Merchandise 

• Free Month of Jazzercise 

• Full I Hr. Body Massage by 
Certified Massage Therapist 

• Beanie Babies (Every 1/2 Hr.) 

• $50.00 Gift Certificate for Dover Straits 

• I Pair Eyeglasses ($200.00 Value) 
•Two $25.00 Gift Certificates forToys-R-Us 

• Cordless Remote Phone 

• Big Button Phone 

• Fanny Packs 

• Cervical Pillows 

• Lumbar Pillows 

• Free Bone Health Evaluation 

(Osteoporosis - $400.00 Value) 

• Free Fitness Training Session 

• Alzheimer. Care Book 

• Three I Year Subscriptions To Lakeland Newspapers 

with 3-D Card ($150.00 Value Each) 
AND MORE! 



M? 



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i'M FLANIGAN 

o the Chicago Bears will be 
'°"7 ^ *e Health Fair 
Meet h,rn and get his 
autograph at 

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Sponsored by: 

Lakeland Publishers, Inc. 
and College of Lake County 



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' ■ . :f 





David McSweeney 

Palatine Township Trustee; Re-elected 
April 1. 

Former President, Palatine Township 
Republican Organization 

Managing director of a major financial 
institution. 

BA in Economics, Duke University, 1987. 
MBA, Duke Fuqua School of Business, 
1988.' 

Grew up in Barringtoa (Cuba Township). 

Married. He and wife Margaret have two 
daughters: Melissa, 4Vi y and Katie, 3. 



David McSweeney on the Issues 

Favors abolishing the current IRS tax code and adopting a fairer "flat tax." 

Favors term limits for members of Congress. 

Favors getting the federal government out of local education. 

Favors a mandatory death penalty for murderers of young children. 

Opposes "most favored nation" trade status for Communist China until it 
halts its official policy of religious persecution. 



Vote for 



McSweeney ft 



in the Republican Primary on Tuesday, March 17 

A Ronald Reagan Conservative for the 8th District of Illinois 

Authorized and paid for by David McSweeney for Congress; Anthony N. Luczkiw, Treasurer 



fc'l 




A18 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 13, 1998 



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1 '85 Chevy Cavalier 

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•92 Jeep Cherokee 
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'96 Isuzu Trooper 

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1 "91 Sable GS Wagon 
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1 '93 Chevy Lumlnn 

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90 Chevy Berctta 

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*97GMCl-1ton 

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I'M Pont. GranilAmSE 
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'95 Chevy Blazer 
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'97 Isuzu Bodeo 

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Cars. Plus tax, title, license a nd do c, fee 

mmmmmmm 




March 13, .1998 




\ March 17 Elect 




State Representative 



Republican Candidate 62nd District 

J5J 20 years extensive community service 

Wm 10 years local government service 

Q 27 years of business experience 
Elect the candidate with the proven ability to do the job 

Endorsed by: 

State Senator Adeline Geo-Karis v State Representative Robert Churchill 

LC Coroner Barbara Richardson • LC States Attorney Michael Walker 

Antioch Mayor Marilyn Shineflug • Lake Villa Mayor Frank Loffredo 

Lindenhurst Village President Paul Baumunk • Lake Villa Clerk Alice Brownlee 

Lake Villa Township Supervisor Sue Hansen • Zion Township Supervisor Truman Hudson 

Zion Resident Judy Mackey • Zion Resident Dave McAdams • Newport Fire Chief Mark Kirschoffer 

Benton Township Supervisor Tim Hattori • Benton Township Assessor Richard Studebaker 

The Chicago Tribune • Chicago Sun-Times • News Sun • Lakeland Newspapers 

Paid for by Citizens for Osmond, A copy of our report is available for purchase from the Stale Board of Elections Springfield, IL 






• •,.-- • 



\ 



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Vt Px«. Cjtim tnn i*mx 

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»M, m 0) l«U Men Strwi M t-». 
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1988 CHEVY 

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1999 

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1895 FORD 

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IBM NISSAN 

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1893 P0NTUC 
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1997 
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1889P0KIUC 

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1935 FORD 
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'8980 



1897 tUICK 
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1993 HONDA 

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1995 DODGE 

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1988 CHEVY 1500 

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1994 CHEVY 

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1992 CHEVY 

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1996 CMC 1500 
EXT. CM 4x4 SUE 

ftlUt tut. IxK • 

'20,970 



1994 CHEVY 
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'8970 



1991 FOftO 
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'10,870 



1 999 CMC 

S-1S JIMMY 

4DR.SLT 

lix MM !->, lata) 

•17,580 



1993 CHEW 

3500 EXT CAB 
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'18,970 

1991 GMC 

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A20 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



March 13, 1998 



re/ 



vsi- 



LECT 



wmm 





Candidate for Lake County Board District One 



Linda is Endorsed By: 

Robert W. Churchill 

State JRepresentative 

Marilyn Shinefiug 

Mayor of Antioch 

William C. Dam 

Chairman Fox Waterway Agency 

Kathy Smith 

Township Clerk 



Barbara Richardson 

Lake County Coroner 

Bob Grever 

Lake County Board Chairman 

Tim Osmond 

Township Supervisor 

Heather Marrotta 

Township Assessor 






Lake Villa 

Township Republican 

Committeeman 

Bud Scott 

Joe Hamm 

Bill Burns 






f 



Mark Ring 

Township Road Commissioner 

Antioch Township Antioch Village 

Trustees Trustees 

Judith Davis Mabel Lou Weber 

Steve Smouse Taso Maravela 

Wanda Schaefer Dorothy Larson 

Ronald Cunningham 

Supported By: Marvin Oldenburger 
Lake County Farm Bureau 

What people are saying about Linda: 

"I have worked with Linda on several -occasions, she is .a very conscientious, capable lady who always follows 

through on anything she gets involved with" - State Senator Adeline Geo-Karis . 
"As my Assistant Legislative Aide for 2 years Linda Pedersen demonstrates an excellent understanding of the 
issues that effect people in our district. I think Linda will make an outstanding Lake County Board Member." - 

State Representative Bob Churchill 

"Linda Pedersen is a breath of fresh air for District #1 in the County Board race. Linda brings many years of 

community involvement, years of local government experience, and the knowledge and insight of the needs 

of District #1 of Lake County. I look forward to the Possibility of being able to work with Linda during the 

next term on the County Board;' - Bob Grever, Lake County Board Chairman 
"I am veiy pleased to endorse Linda Pedersen for Lake County Board in District One. Her honesty and fair- • 
ness, her outstanding leadership skills and long history of community service combine to make her the right 

choice for this important position." - Marilyn Shinefiug, Mayor of Antioch 




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I'aid ft* l<y Citiftiis k UikJj IWlnvn MS Mum Tut 
Lainr.Aiitindi. lUiiknMOOJ.Aaim 'iit]inhni(1«illl« 

.iuil.iM (<■[ [.urJiw: ;ii lit l.dt l'jr.niirv (li-rltA Hffurr, 
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Eating Healthy 

Haw To Set Your Fitness Goals 

Exercise? Here Are The Excuses 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



AA 1 Service & Towing Inc. 



Honest ASE certified mechanic / Quality work 
Lowest prices / While you wait service 



847-838-4950 



Rt. 41 &Rt. 173 
Wadsworth, IL 60099 

Located on the side of the same 
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GRAND OPENING SPECIALS, WHAT A DEAL! 



Hours: Mon. - Fri. = 8 am 
Sat. = 8 am - 2 pm 
Sun. - Emergencies 



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$ 



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* Change oil and filler 

* Lubricate chasm 

* Top off fluids 



Includes 

• Check air filler & tire 

pressure 

• Up loSqtv oloil 



$ 



Engine tune-up 



$ 



39.95 



Computerized engine analysis 

Install new spark plugs 

Check & let timing, 

carburetor & idle speed 

Check fuel, emission systems 

Other engine performance ilemt additional 



4-cyl Includes 

* Int pec! filter, hotev belti 
iwitet 

■ 6-cyl. 149.95, B-cyl. 159.95 

■ Recommended every 
12,000 miles 



I 
I 

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Cooling system flush 



39.90 Includes 



Brakes 



• Drain and flush coolant tyttem • Inspect hoses and belts 

• Add up lo 2 gallon! of coolant • Recommended every 

• Check A presuriie system 2ya or 24,000 milei 



S 



54.95 



Transmission service* 



s 



34.95 



Per axel Includes 

• Resurface rotors or drums, * inspect master cylinder & 

• Repack wheel bearings brake lines 

• Installation only of pads or shoes • Test drive vehicle 
(disc pads or brake shoes and parts eitra) 



30/60/90,000 mile 
factory scheduled maintenance* 



Includes 



Drain 4 replace transmission 

fluid 

Clean screen & part 

inspect eiternal teals 



New filter or screen additional 
Tesi drive vehicle 



S 



159.90 



Total computerised engine diagnostics • 



4-cyl Includes 



Recommended every TS.000 miles 1 * Oil change, lube & tire relation 



Engine lime-up 4 complete 
safety inspection 
| • Transmission service 



I 



Cooling system flush 
New PCV 4 air filter 
Inspect, clean & adjust 
brakes if necessary 
6cyUI699S.8cyl.limS. 
other performances items addl. 



Also: 24 hr. Towing & Service available, complete stock of belts, 
hoses, filters, headlights & used tires for your emergency repairs! 



Thank You, 

Joe M. Escobedo 

Owner / Master Mechanic 




*Some vehicles, vans, pick-ups, fuel injected, V & transverse engines 
additional, prices subject to change without notice! 

For our regular / local customers and fleet service, we can keep a complete computerized 
history of all the work done on your car or truck. This takes the mystery out of when and what 
work was done on your vehicle! As an added service to our customer;, we can notify you by 
mail, (if you want us to) of any work your vehicle needs according to the manufacturers 
recommended maintenance schedule. 



Enjoy the Freedom You've Earned! 

Hawthorn Lakes is truly what retirement living was meant to be-the ideal residence for individuals 
or couples who look forward to enjoying the freedom that they have earned. Hawthorn Lakes 
offers residents a gracious retirement community-a place where you can live life to its fullest! 

Hawthorn Lakes sets you free from the endless list of repairs and maintenance of owning a home 
and lets you spend your time, energy and resources doing the things you want to do-entertaining 
family and friends, traveling, developing new hobbies. The location is perfect. Hawthorn Lakes is 
close to everything, with all the amenities of the neighborhood right at your doorstep. Experience 
all that Hawthorn Lakes has to offer! 

• One Affordable Monthly Fee 

• Beautifully Appointed Spacious 1 and 2 Bedroom Apartments 

• Full Service Dining 

• Weekly Housekeeping and Linen Services 

• All Utilities 

• Scheduled Transportation 

• Emergency Response System in Every Apartment 

• Fitness Center with Whirlpool and Sauna 

• 24-hour Concierge 

• Personal Care & Assisted Living Services Available 

• Beauty and Barber Shop 

To learn more about all that 
Hawthorn Lakes has to offer, 
please call 847/367-2516 
to arrange a tour. 



&&&r 



Hawthorn Lakes 

OF LAKE COUNTY 



10 East Hawthorn Parkway 
Vernon Hills, IL 60061 



t& 



Hawthorn Lukes 

provides equal 
housing opportunities 
to persons 62 years 
of age or older. 



2 Health Update 1998 




Lakeland Newspapers 



Health & Fitness 



1998 



As the Lakeland Community grows, so does the health, med- 
ical and fitness profession in size and technology. The Lakeland 
health and medical community strives to bring the newest tech- 
nology and best medical care to this area. 

Health & Fitness Directory is available through the Lake 
County, parts of Cook, McHenry and Kenosha counties, as well 
as on the Internet through the Lakeland Publishers website 
@lnd.com. 

We welcome your comments, 223-8161. 

Meet Jim Flanigan, Chicago Bears at the 

Body Tailors booth, 

Lakeland Publishers' Health Fair '98 

William H. Schroeder — Publisher 

William M. Schroeder — Presldent/CEO 

Vlnce Saputo — Display Advertising Manager 

Neal Tucker — Executive Editor 



******************************** 



On Our Cover: Or. Donnls McCroory, 

board carllflad family practlonor 

with ofllcos In Zlon, talks with 

Sandlo Llltnor, Antloch. Covor p n i,i 1 vi iprc 

daalgn by Hopo Stoddard. x UUll&IlLia 



Lakeland 



1 ^PBEMJER ! 


(Ca€IROPRACTFie) 


ff^ ^P^S ^ j5BH^'' ^ '"■K 1^^ 



Experience a doctor who believes that 
Honesty, Great Service,Professionalism, and 

a good bedside manner are his best 

attributes. Now, experience a doctor that 

believes that healthcare should not cost an 

arm and a leg. The doctor that everyone 

should know is Dr. John Bouma, 

of the Premier Chiropractic Center 

in Grayslake. 

Call and ask about our New Patient Special 

Call (847) 543-1055 



c 

D 



* 

* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 



MmCKfflTO 

HEALMWITH 

CHIROPRACTIC CARE 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



J If any one of these symptoms seem J 
J familiar, let us help you J 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
*• 
* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 



• HcudnchcH 

• Neck Pain 

• Mid Back Pain 
Sport Injuries 




• Whiplash 

* Auto or Work Related Injuries 

• Lower Back Pain or Stiff nesa 

* Numbness or Pain in Arms or Legs 



* 
* 

$ 25.00 J 

* Consultation with Dr. Scott Reiser * 
* Chiropractic Examination * 
♦Initial X-Rays (If Needed) /J 

Expires 3/31/98 



CALL TODASf FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT 

847/740-2800 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 
CHIROPRACTIC 

314 W. Rollins Rd. 
Round Lake Beach, IL 

(Next to Eagle Foods & Dollar Video) 

Work Comp. 4 P.I. Cases Excluded, But Covered 100$. 




******************************** 



NATURAL 
RELIEF 



yr^-^*KX: 




for much more than back and neck pain. Dr. Dino Bosco 

•Headaches/Sinus Problems • Fatigue 

•Irritability/Mood Swings "Sleep Disorders 

•Digestive Problems "Carpal Tunnel Syndrome 

•Shoulder/Arm Pain •Sciatica/Leg Pain 

Utilizing Safe And Gentle Non-Drug 
and Non-Surgical Methods 

•Private Consultation • Physical and Stress Examination 

•X-Rays (If needed) • Report of Your Analysis 

•Introductory Offer Ends in 2 weeks - $175 value 

Bosco Chiropractic Clinic 
117 E. Park Ave. 
Libertyville, IL 60048 






N t 



Rla 176 



□ 



Call Today...680-3138 

• Most Insurance/Medicare Accepted 

• Auto Accidents/Work Injuries Covered 100% 

Dr. Bosco will be conducting a Free Health 
and Stress Exhibit at Health Fair '98 at CLC. 



■• 



C 



Lakeland Neivspapers 



Health & Fitness Directory 1998 3 



Deliver To: 
**ECRWSS**R 
Postal Patron 



BULK RATE 

CARRIER ROUTE PRESORT 

U.S, POSTAGE PAID 

SKOKIE, IL 

PERMIT #313 



AA 1 Service & Towing Inc 

847-838-4950 

Rt. 41 & Rt. 173 Hours: Mon. - Fri 8 am - 6 pm 

Wadsworth, IL 60099 Sat 8 am - 2 pm 

Located on the side of the same building as the Amoco Sun, ... Emergencies 

O Having Trouble Finding a Good, Honest Mechanic? Now you have! 
O Drivability Problems? We'll tune your car to factory specifications! 

Hello, my name is Jose M. Escobedo. I recently opened an auto repair shop at the "Amoco" at Rt. 41 and Rt. 173 
in Wadsworth. I have over 1 1 A.S.E. certified years of repairing and servicing thousands of cars and trucks. 
Before opening this location I worked as the Manager/Head mechanic at the Morton Grove Amoco for 6 years. 
I constantly stay up-to-date of the latest technology in computerized auto-mechanics and have developed 
excellent troubles/touting, repair and tune-up skills. 

Our shop is completely automated with 2 computerized diagnostic machines, 4 bays, and quick reliable service. 
I opened my shop here because / know it is always difficult to find a good mechanic. Now you have. 

Come in and try us for one of the specials listed on the opposite side of this flyer, or for any mechanical, 

electrical, drivability problem or just a great tune-up. I promise to deliver honesty, straight answers, 

reasonable rates, and reliable service. 

Thank you, 



ALL MAJOR CREDIT 
CARDS ACCEPTED 



Have your Charging and Starting Systems 

tested for just $12.95 with the purchase of 

any of my listed Specials! 




JOSE M. ESCOBEDO, Owner/Master mechanic 
AA l SERVICE & TOWING INC. 






5 

n 



5 






FEELIN6 CREAT IN '981 



Would You Like To Wake Up Thinner? 

Calorad 

Would you like to: 

• Lose Inches and pounds while you sleep 
without dieting, exercise or stimulants? 

• Relieve Joint pain, muscle pain and 
Inflammation? 

• Increase stamina - Improve sleep - tighten 
and tone muscles and skin? 



Call To rind Out What 




We Have In Common 
With Chickens? 



Clinical trials have shown 86% of 
Calorad users have received these 
benefits and more simply by taking 
one tablespoon of Calorad with a 
glass of water on an empty stomach 
before bedtime. 



Recommended for fifteen years by healthcare 
professionals and doctors In Canada and the U.5. 

Call Paula, C.P.T.: (847)566-7284 
Joy: (847) 566-4993 

e-mail: J0yd0n@5prynet.com 



Time to brush up on dental hygiene 

Dr. Sonin Gutierrez DDS 

Q. When should my child first see a dentist? 

A. Your child should visit a pediatric dentist by 2 to2 1/2 
years of age. Early examination and preventive care will pro- 
tect your child's smile now and in the future. Some children 
benefit from an even earlier examination if they have been on 
the bottle past one year of age. 

Q. What dental problems could baby have? 

A. The most important reason for an earlier visit is a prac- 
tical prevention program. A big concern is nursing or baby 
bottle tooth decay. Your baby risks severe decay when he or 

Please see DENTAL HYGI ENE on page 9 



CHILDREN'S DENTAL HEALTH 

MONTH TOOTH TIPS 

Toothbrush Etiquette 

• Use Soft Bristle Brushes Only 

• Choose a size that fits your child 
(the smaller the better) 

• Replace brushes every 3 months 

• If bristles fan out to the sides, it's 
time to replace 






mnc-ui 
auuriHirTJu. 



mm w>m j 



1 5 Commerce Dr., Suite 1 1 6 
Grayilalce, |L 60030 



% Dentisttllllll ew-iig-Bao 

^ $30«> «f % 

-^ For First Tim k ^=^L 
Patients ^^~ 




Dr. Sonin Gutierrez 
D.B.J., H.t. 



Email: KldsDDS@Lnd.com 
Web Page: www.kidsDDS.com 



4 Health & Fitness Directory 1998 




2 CALORIE PORTIONS 



COMPLETE 
MEALS DAILY 



ocuYtur to homi m oma 



FRESHLY PREPARED HEALTHY MEALS 
NOT FROZEN OR DRIED 

Nutnuonjl Anjtyjii \t bucd on 28 D»y Menu Cycle 



FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 
(847) 949-5568 (847) 338-8668 

510 N.LAKE ST, 550 N. GREEN BAY RD. 

MUNDELEIN, IL 60060 WAUKEG AN, IL 60085 

OR 1-8O0-442-DIET • DAY OR NIGHT 



SPINAL 
\/A „ HEALTH 
;|V * ASSOCIATES, EC 




Gregory D.Thurston, D.C. 
Ronald M. Rebmann, D.C 

Chiropractic Orthopedists 

Emergency Care For: 

Low Back, Disc, Neck Pain 
Headaches & Sports Injuries 



Available On Premise: 

>-Ph) >sfcal Therapy * 

>Sporls/hijury Rehabilitation 

^Massage 'Therapy 

>Nearological/Orthope(/ich>aiaation 

>-JL\vrcise Programs 

680-4777 

unZMttuwiixeAiv. (Forum Scpuitv) Ubertyvitte 

WonWt Comptnumn ' Ptnoml Injury . PPQ Prwidtr ■ Hon liuuonct Attend 




Lakeland Newspapers 




Sp/Una/ Into/ 
l}ubYie£& cut/. 



00,0 



OQO 



i i 
ii 



• Aerobics Clusci for 
rat-Burning & Toning 
Stare-of-the-Art Cardio Equipment 
including the Nov Non-Impact 
Transport! A; Body Treki 
•Strength Training Equipment 
Designed Specifically for Women 
•Open 7Dayi 
Also featuring... 
•Kid"! Club 
Tanning k Nail Salon 
Personal Training eV Pro Shop 




u!-nnl 



100 South Atkinson Rd., Grayslakc, IL 60030 

847-548-CORY (2679) 

oitv n& at' < z£af:c(and>'s^° 

llfv 6c l/Une&s* ^abu 

to- team- maxc^a&otU- 
ouvLiciliUt! 1 





^9J|*U3£^iJF^V * It 



wwjftpjsiri 



PERSONAL FITNESS TRAIHiJ 




Mclaughlin fitness systems, inc. 

ARE YOU EXERCISING TOO HARD? 

WHY WON'T ANY DIETS WORK? 

IS THERE A SECRET TO LOSING FAT? 

(847)855-8512 

Professional certified training 

in the convenience 
of your home, office or gym. 



WE BRING THE GYM TO YOU! 




S 



LET US HELPYOU PUT A LITTLE 
SPRING BACK IN YOUR STEP 



.j 2 z£RC| 



,N. 



m 



>Z) 



• Geared For All Ages & Fitness Levels • Certified Instructors 

• No Membership Fees • No Contracts • Register At Anytime 

Jazzerclse. 

FREE INTRODUCTORY CLASS 
1 2 WEEKS $AQ00 

•New jiudenu only. *Ofl*r good when regiilering with the tree chu. Expirei 4-IB-98. 

ANTIOCH GRAYSLAKE/ 

847-838-3 154 LINDENHURST 

J_-BOO-FIT IS IT 8 4. 7 .-?_??--_?55_L 

OEIliianBm^aneBH^HHi^H^BBBSaHnSBEa 



jazzercise 

-We're Different. — 

Let us tell you how. 

You won't feel like a "klute." 

Sure, you mjy /in when we zag .it first, hut no one is watch- 
ing. ..they're loo liusy trying to figure out what ihcy ore doing! 
Our teachers TEACH and give OPTIONS. You will be successful 
from the beginning! 

You will not be required to sign a contract or pay any 
membership fees. 

There ate none. You can pay as you go, monthly or bimonthly— 
you can choose! 

You will be challenged, but not intimidated. 

Our choreography is exciting fun, funky, jazzy and always a surprise, 
as we mix the new with the familiar lo surprise and uplift you. 

You will be MOTIVATED and EDUCATED. 

Our instructors are trained anil certified lo teach! They are teachers 
andmolivators-Tbey will inspire >ou to iJo your liest and teach you 
how to achieve your goats. They will keep you safe! 

You will love how it feels! 

You will enjoy yourself and have fun and actually look forward 
to your next class! Experience the joy and fun of movement, 
dancing, stretching and resistance training. 

You will receive the very best fitness. 

Cardiovascular exercise, muscle toning, strengthening, circuit 

L training and interval training plus nutrition lips are all offered in a 
variety of formats. 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Health & Fitness Directory 1998 5 



■ 



i 




laeahfe care 
ABBOTT 





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r2i»n^DiwE Cornier 






BRADLEY COUhSHJMG CEKTER 

U&EY3LU WMSiBUN 

joe west Js ^SBsl^stil. 

^CT25C-3322 ££€3 244-7177 



You don't have to go this far 
to and excellent health care, 







• :ur 



nfcra! source for beafth care 
is 90 much doser to home. 



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Non-Emergency Numbers 



| Condell 

g Medical Center. .. . 

] Midwestern Reg. - n . cw 

I Medical Center.... B?2-45oi 

ft 

i Children's 

j Hospital of Wis. 

>| Lake Forest 

A Hospital...... 



Good Shepherd m „ m 
Hospital ...,.381-9600 



StTherese n , ft ,, 

Medical Center.... 249-0 



847) 



234-5600 




The Diagnosis is Never Easy to Hear... 



LVIL 



^^ TUP PAP 



THE FAMILY DOCTORS 

Friendly Service for 48 years 

Attending Physicians; 

Christopher E.G. Harris, M.D. Mark H. Fields, M.D. 

Demelrios J. Karamichos, M.D. William R. Greenfield, M.D. 
Estelie S. Fletcher, M.D., Ph.D. Charles S. Colodny, M.D. 

New Patients Always Welcome, Call Today for an Appointment 
Condell Medical Building 7 1 6 S. Milwaulkce Ave. 

6440 E. Grand Ave., Gurnec Libertyville 

856-1724 362-1393 



H mini uhausifJ all the ivuihr treatment options, 
I had to Ml thf family hit JidJiMli] wuj irrmiwl 
Himorr, I Inrw that by iufftstin]( thspttt, they 
could attain tht additional support they would nerd to 
help them atlffr thnuth this. Now that my patient 
hat only months to flif, / am mart (tttofo than evet 
thil was tht rifht lirf iiiwt. It is presiding Uhdi with a 
lut mart lammts thatt honv health would be obit la 
offtt. The nunti futr ban uiiufuij with pa'm ulief 
mhile tht aides have tvrn htlpinj him uilh hit daily 
we. And their social wortet has been helpint them 
with their financial litiutian. The whole family opprt- 
tints tht tvhmsett, i»Mi has allowed family members 
to cany on their Inn with some semblance of normalcy. 
In these cases, il maid my fob a lot easier when I 
bww my patients and their families hmr hwpke far 
support. 

-Dt.lxkZ, 



...or to give. 

However, help Is available when the 
diagnosis of a terminal illness create* 
pain and turmoil that Is too much to 
bear. The Hospice of Northeastern 
Illinois (HNI), can help. 

UNI is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to helping those with life-limiting 
Illnesses and their families retain their dignity and maintain the highest quality of 
life possible. Using a team of dedicated medical, social service and spiritual profes- 
sionals as well as specially trained volunteers, HNI provides 24-hour 
assistance to Its patients and their caregivers. HNI serves patients and 
families in Boone, DuPage, Kane, McHenry and western Cook and 
Lake Counties. 



For additional information on the Hospice of Northeastern Illinois, 
call 800/425-4444. 





Growing A Health Care Network 
Throughout Lake County 

We're proud of Condcll's growing health care network in Lake County... 
. • First comprehensive fitness facility in the nation 

• First intcrgcncrattonal day care center in the Midwest 

• First fully digital Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory in Lake County 

• A system of Acute Care Centers and physician office buildings throughout Lake County 



At Condell Medical Center, we take the name 
"Community Hospital" to heart. It reflects our 
commitment to meet the health care needs of 
the people who live and work here. We keep 
that commitment by providing seamless 
quality medical care. 

Working together, we'll continue to 
deliver the high level of health care 
that Lake County wants. And deserves. 



O 

Condell Medical Center 

801 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville, IL 60048 

(847) 362-2900 

http://www.contlc1l.org 

Lake County's Health Care Network 



a 



<■: 



Lake t mid Newspapers 



Health & Fitness Directory 1998 7 



00 



0? 
5. 



ri 

(A 






I 

5? 



If You Think Finding 
One of America's 
Best Hospitals Means 
Going to a Big City, 



Think Again 







£>r 'C"A 




Ite^QtL 



J-JDU^tD/j/.T/l 



Midwestern Regional Medical Center Received One 
of the Nation's Highest Ratings for Quality Care. 




When it comes to healllicare wliicli is personal- 
ized, compassionate and truly fociksed tin your 
needs. Midwestern Regional Medical Center is the 
clear choice. 

Our 95-iJccl hospital, located in a park-like setting 
with easy access anil ample parking, lias set die 
standard nationwide fur excellence and innovation. 
In 19%, Midwestern received :i rating of 99 out of 
100 by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of 
Healthcare Organizations, ranking the hospital 
among the top four percent of all hospitals in the 
United Stales. 



"Hut remarkable arcomplishnieht reflects;! com 
niitment to medical excellence and quality care by 
300 physicians, nurses, and oilier exceptional care 
givers Our patients tell us lime and again ih.it we're 
like no other hospital - thai they're treated like indi- 
vidual jxrople, taring for them body, mind and soul. 

It's a difference that makes us special and its just 
one of the reasons why we're one of the highest 
rated hospitals in the country. 

FitttI out how Multivalent am malm a tliffcrcitcv 
in )xntr lifi: For tttt ittfonnatioii kit, or to schedule a 
tour, ptectse atll 800322-9183 ext 6367. 



Midwestern ri 

* i i. • H v \ i v i ii i i vi ' i s i i n 

2520 Ehsha Avenue. Zion. IL 60099 
www.publiconline.com/=mrmc 



_ Cancer ptogtam nurutjrd by -, 



%, 



' ^"Skmohs*."^"*' 



r AcciediUtiori mtn Commeittalion by -, 




•—- 



"Tl i llliW—WW— Wi 



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MsiM to5 



The pressure to diet and be thin in 
America is intense. Thin, beautiful 
supermodels always have been featured 
on runways, on television, and in maga- 
zines, but what's astounding is the grow- 
ing weight-loss industry. For whatever 
reasons, more and more people seem to 
be affected by the desire to be thin; the 




3r| Q L $30 billion- 
mmm sr 

offers strong 
evidence Tor 
this. 

Anti-diet- 
ingand 
body acceptance, may fail to address 
the health risks of obesity and eating. 
The chronic dieter of the 1990s has 
lost touch with his or her own body 
by not listening to its signals. When 
you were a child, for example, you 
intuitively ate when you were hungry; 



and stopped when you were full. 
Rediscover the basic necessity of eat- 
ing- to nourish the body. Yet, to be 
realistic, you are not told to reject the 
pleasures that food can bring. Part of 
learning how to "honor" your hunger 
and your fullness is to rediscover the 
delights of food. 

Make peace with your food and dis- 
cover that your body has its own natural 
weight, which is often lighter than you 
are at the moment, but not necessarily 
the super model dimensions that adver- 
tisers portray as paragons of health, hap- 
piness and beauty. 



DENTAL HYGIENE 



From page A 



she nurses continuously from the breast 
or from a bottle of milk, formula or juice 
during the day or at night. 

The earlier the dental visit, the better 
the chance of preventing dental problems. 
Children with healthy teeth chew food 
easily, learn to speak clearly and smile 
with confidence. Start your child now on a 
lifetime of good dental habits. 

Q. How can I prevent tooth 
decay from nursing or a bottle? 

A. Don't nurse your baby to sleep or 
put them to bed with a bottle of milk, 
formula, juice or sweetened liquid. While 
they sleep, any unswallowed liquid in the 
mouth supports bacteria that produce 



acids and attack the teeth. Protect your 
child from severe tooth decay by putting 
them to bed with nothing more than a 
pacifier or bottle of water. 

Q. How do I make my child's diet 
safe for his teeth? 

A. First, be sure he has a balanced 
diet. Then, check how frequently he eats 
foods with sugar or starch in them. Food 
with starch include breads, crackers, 
pasta and such snacks as pretzels and 
potato chips. 

When checking for sugar, look 
beyond the sugar bowl and candy dish. A 
variety of foods contain one or more 
types of sugar, and all types of sugars can 



promote dental decay. Fruits, a few veg- 
etables and most milk products have at 
least one type of sugar. Sugar can be 
found in many processed foods, even 
some that do not taste sweet. 

For example, a peanut butter and 
jelly sandwich not only has sugar in the 
jelly, but may have sugar added to the 
peanut butter. Sugar is also added to 
such condiments as catsup and salad 
dressings. 

Editor's note: Dr. Sonia Gutierrez, 
DDS, MS, Kids Dentist and The American 
Academy of Pediatric Dentistry can be 
contacted at 15 Commerce Dr. Suite 116, 
Grayslake. Call 223- MOO. 



5 



3 




Your child's health 

Your child's health and well-being is our primary 
concern. That's why we have opened the Children's 
Hospital Clinics at 310 S. Grccnlcaf Avenue in 
Our nee, 

Leading specialists in such areas as allergy, cardiology, 
genetics, hematology, neurology, orthopedics, surgery 
and urology are available by appointment to meet the 
very special needs of all the children in your 
community. 

To learn more about Children's Hospital Clinics, 
visit our booth at the Lakeland Newspapers 
'98 Health & Fitness Fair at the College of Lake 
County on Saturday } March 28, from 10 am to 
3 pm. Or call us at 847-662-4380. 




Children's 

Health System 




Children's 
Hospital 

of Wisconsin ™ 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Health & Fitness Directory 1998 9 



~ 




At Lake Forest Hospital, our specialty is providing 
high quality medical care. Hut. we pride ourselves on 
caring for the needs of the whole person in a comfortable, 
caring environment. 

In addition lo our superb and varied health care services, 
the Lake Forest Hospital foundation offers a variety of 
other resources designed to care for the quality of your life. 



Lake Forest 
Health and 
Fitness 
Institute 



Lake Forest 
Hospital 



COMMUNITY 



; I Dearhnven 
: Child Care 

: and Learning 

: Center 

: Westmoreland 
Nursing Center 

Call for a listing of ouk current 
community education programs, 

(847) 234-61 12. 

Find out how you, your family and your company 
can become part of the Lake Forest Hospital family and 
the Rush System for Health. 

Call (847) 234-617! today! 




Lake Forest Hospital 



SM 



Caring for the Quality of Your Life 

600 N. Westmoreland Road 
Lake Forest, IL fit)(M5 
(H47)234-5(iOO 

http:www.laltcforcsthospttal.com 



'• 




MATERNITY SERVICES, 



* 










10 Health & Fitness Directory 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers 



// 



Condell's NutriQuest Program says 
Spring Clean Your Exercise Attitude 



// 



Hoping to shape up this spring, shed some unwanted 
pounds and improve your health? Most of us are. And we also 
know that regular exercise is an important part of maintain- 
ing a healthier weight. So why don't we do it? 

"People who have not yet made exercise a regular part of 
their lifestyle often find themselves sabotaged by a few com- 
mon situations," comments Karen Demski, manager of the 
NutriQuest program offered by Condell's Medical Center 
Health Institute (MCI II) located in Centre Club, 200 W. Golf 
Rd., Libertyvillu. "We all know that we should get regular exer- 
cise for our overall health, as well as to assist in weight con- 
trol, but our lives provide us with plenty of excuses to avoid 
it," she adds. 

Demski says successfully incorporating an exercise pro- 
gram requires some spring cleaning of our attitudes about 
exercise and then addressing these excuses or concerns 
before they arise and determining how we will deal with 
them. 

The following are some common excuses that we all use 
for not exercising, and ideas from Demski for overcoming 
them: 

• I'm too busy. 

"Keep an activity diary for one week. Log the time you 
spend on every activity. Include office time, childcare, house- 
hold chores, cooking, entertainment, television viewing, 



reading, etc. Then explore ways with your family to combine, 
delegate, or eliminate some activities to create three 20* 
minute slots per week for exercise." 

• I'm just too tired. 

"Remind yourself that regular exercise will give you more, 
not less, energy. Experiment at least twice with this idea by 
committing to take a 20-minute walk before you begin dinner 
preparations. Take your dog or children along. It won't take 
more than a few outings to prove to yourself that the fresh air 
and exercise will increase your energy level for the next few 
hours." 

• I just can't get started on an exercise program. 

"Pick something you enjoy. Don't be influenced by anoth- 
er's preferences. Attempting to force yourself to regularly per- 
form a fitness activity you hate is foolish. Consider swim- 
ming, walking, tennis, rowing or another activity to get you 
started. Once your energy and endurance levels are 
improved, you may find yourself drawn to other kinds of 
exercise." 

For more information on behavior modification, nutritional 
education and weight management, attend one of the free 
weight management orientation programs offered every 
Wednesday at 7 p.m., at Centre Club, a Condell affiliate, 200 
W. Golf Rd*, Libertyville. For reservations, call MCI II at 362- 
2905, ext. 5770. 



B 



i. 



+ No. appoint- 
ment needed . 

+ Immediate 
medical treat- * 
merit 

+ Staffed by 
Physicians,., 
nurses and tech- ' 
nicians trained in 
critical care and 
illness/injuries 

+ Free Blood \ 
Pressure Checks ..'■' 

+ Full x-ray, 
. laboratory, and - 
mammography 
services 



R x for Health Care - At Home, Work 

or Play... Condell's Acute Care Team 

Our experienced team is specially trained in critical care, as well as treating 
illness and injuries. On-site X-ray and lab services mean fast diagnosis and 
economical, convenient care. So when you need help, get the help you need. 

o 

Condell Acute Care Centers 



2 E. Rollins Rd. 
Round Lake Beach 

740-2500 

Open 8am lo 10pm every day 



6440 Grand Ave. al Hunt Club Rd. 
Gurncc Mills 

249-2800 

Open Sam to midnight every day 



150 Hal f Day Rd. 
Buffalo Grove 

215-0000 

Open 24 hours every day 
Affiliated with Condell Medical Center • Libertyville <— ^— — 



6 Phillip Rd. 
Vernon Hills 

680-0500 

Open Ham lo 10pm every clay 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Health & Fitticss Directory 1998 11 







Now Our Doctors 
Are Almost As Close As 
^bur Medicine Cabinet. 



I3uc.ui.sc we listen, we know yon want your doctor 

conveniently close u> your home arid family. 

So now, whether your needs are for obstetrics and gynecology, 

pediatrics or simply good primary care, you can find doctors hacked by 

the experience and expertise of Good Shepherd I lospital 

in many areas including Algonquin, Harrington, Gary; Crystal Lake and Palatine. 

And that's good, because your family physician 

should be close to where your family is. 

For more information about (food Shepherd 1 lospital, 
fir for a free physician referral, call 1 -800-3 -ADVOCATE. 

Good Shepherd Hospital 

i^Advocatc 

I fealth GircvWh A Whole New Altitude 

451) WW jlijjhwa>-22, Harrington. IllinoisfitiOlO 
Related id the Ifcmgelid I .uiheraa Church in Aincrjea and the United Church of Christ. 



12 Health & Fitiicss Directory 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers 




If la known now well they take care 
or you, I would ve arrived sooner. 



77 



At Provena Saint Therese Medical Center we see a 
successful birth as "just the beginning" of what 
we provide for you and your child. Which means 
that your baby can look forward to comprehen- 
sive and personalized care far beyond the day of 
birth. 

For example, soon after you leave, our 
Mother/Baby Wellness Program provides you with 
home visits from one of our program nurses. 
During these meetings the nurse will perform a 
complete health assessment and provide you 
with a wealth of baby care information, including 
bathing, cord care, nutrition and breast feeding 
education. 

To ensure the best possible medical care as your 



baby grows up, Provena Saint Therese boasts the 
most advanced ambulatory surgical unit and the 
only in-patient rehabilitation facility in Lake 
County, a state-of-the-art CAT scanner and an 
accessible out-patient rehabilitation and sports 
medical center in Gurnee. We've also assembled 
an outstanding and highly trained medical staff 
including doctors and specialists hailing from 
some of the top medical schools and teaching 
hospitals in the country. 

It's the kind of complete care, and the amount of 
pride our staff takes in it, that keeps families 
coming back to Provena Saint Therese. In fact, it's 
what makes some family members want to arrive 
a little sooner than expected. 



Vuru |iersnnali7eil 
physician referral or for 
ulher Servian provided by 

I'rm alii S.iinl Therese. call 

847-360-2600 or vigour 
wehsitoat.vww.saiiittherc.se.org 



*L\ Provena 



Saint Therese Medical Center 



What every hospital should be. 



Lakeland Ncxospapers 



Health & Fitness Directory 1998 13 



How's your family-stress juggling act? 



r. 



Juggling the demands of family and work is one of the lead- 
ing causes of stress today. According to IOF Foresters family- 
stress expert, Dr. Richard Earle, parents can be filled with self- 
doubts that fuel personal and family stress. Earle advises that 
juggling demands effectively is the key to managing stress. 

Whether at home or work, stress heats up when the gap 
between "I should" and "I really can" grows too big. 

To help parents cope, a free brochure offering tips on juggling 
responsibilities effectively is available from the IOF Foresters. 
Stress-reducing suggestions include: 
1) Lower expectations, and abandon the notion of being per- 
fect. Sometimes, the dishes can wiat, but family can't. 

2) Get the entire family to help run the household from day 



to day. Give up the idea that only you can do a certain job. 

3) Develop a support network of friends or family to help you 
out at certain times, especially if you're a single parent. 

4) Partners can shift tasks, like shopping or bill paying, to 
each other from short periods of lime whenever one of you 
needs to focus on something of immediate importance. 

Busy parents should learn to budget time wisely, plan regu- 
lar stress breaks for the whole family and stop trying to do 
everything. Cut back, and lake time to relax. 

The IOF Foresters is a not-for-profit Fraternal Benefit Society 
dedicated to supporting projects that help strengthen family 
life. For more free tips on parenting and family stress from the 
organization, call 1-000-922-4-IOF. 



5 



Over-the-counter drug safety 



Most Americans, in 9 out of 10 cases, take care of everyday 
aches and pains without going to a health professional. They 
tend to "tough it out" or buy an over-the-counter (OTC) drug 
product. 

To self-medicate safely, however, means reading the label 
and following (he instructions. It is not safe to assume that, 
because it is an OTC drug, it can be taken freely without regard 
to the information provided on the label. 

This is especially true, because OTC drugs are purchased 
mostly at supermarkets — away from a pharmacist who could 
answer questions. 

A person might, for example, be allergic to some of the 



"IT PAYS TO COMPARE" 




AMERICAN FAMILY 



INSURA 



AUTO HOME BUSINESS HEALTH LIFE 

Call Your Local Agent For All Your 
Health Insurance Needs. 

"AFTER THE SALE IT'S OUR 
SERVICE THAT COUNTS" 



® 



Jim Cermak 


tnglesidefFox Lake 


587-6900 


Jeff Gundelach 


Undenhurst 


356-6070 


Gordon Kiesgen 


Antioch 


838-3400 


Roger Lutz 


Grayslake 


223-2888 


Arpy Sefehan 


Libertyvffle 


367-8848 


Bill D. Stanley 


Lake Villa 


356-7672 


Peter Varghese 


Round Lake Beach 


223-7786 



© 1990 American Family Mutual Insurance Company 
Home Office— Madison, Wl 53783 



active ingredients. If you're taking two OTC drugs at once, 
make sure the products don't contain the same ingredient. In 
such a case, you may be getting a double dose of something. 
Medications also may interfere with each other. Certain 
antacids, for example, reduce the effectiveness of the antibiotic 
tetracycline. 

Read the warnings: People with special medical conditions, 
like high blood pressure, shouldn't take certain drugs. A drug 
may have side effects, or it may not he suitable for young chil- 
dren or pregnant or nursing mothers. Use of an OTC drug also 
may mask the symptoms of a serious condition. When in 
doubt, read the label, or ask vour doctor. 



/instate 

YouVe in good hands. 



BILL ENSOR 

Exclusive Agent 
Premier Service Agent 



DONNA GARRETT 

Exclusive Agent 
Premier Service Agent 



Allstate Insurance Company 

100 S. Atkinson Road, Suite 211 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
(847) 543-0575 
Fax: (847) 543-0775 




24 *i¥<iun, a 'Day Service 



14 Health & Fitness Directory 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers 



STBVBN K. SCHUBERT. M.D. 

Specialists In Adult Medicine 
with Special Interest In: 



• Asthma 

• Emphysema/COPD 

• Cardiology 

• Diabetes 




d 




fc 



■ 



* Board Certified Internal Medicine 

Late Night Hours Available 

6 E. Phillip Rd. (Suite 1101) 
Vernon Hills 

One Block West of Hawthorn Mall 
in Condell Medical Bldg. 
RL 25 to 1-90 East to S3N to 
83 East to Townline Rd, (Rt 60) 

847 362-5353 




<Ralph Q. <Frank, <D0 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 



• Obstetrical Care 

• Annual exams and pap smear 

• Abnormal pap smears 

• Colposcopy 

• Cryotherapy 

• Lee p procedures 

• Family planning 



• Tubal ligations 

• Abnormal periods 

• Menopause 

• Hormone replacement 

• Fibroids 

• Endometriosis 

• Abnormal bleeding 



Condell Medical Building 

2 E. Rollins Rd., Suite 204 

Round Lake Beach, 1L 60073 

(847) 740-0892 

Can call it) set up an a PP oi...mem ami to verify if we arcepi >our insurance. 

Office Hours: Mow 9am to 3pm 

Tiit-s. Ipm to 7pm 

W«l. closet) 

Tluirs. 3pm to Spin 

Fri. 9am to 3pm 

Alternating Saturdays 'Jam to l2iioon 



Dr. Michael Schrciber 
Family Medicine 

Located at 
185 N. Milwaukee Ave. • Lincolnshire 




Sports School and Camp 
Physical Special 

$35.00* 

For Appointments Call: 
847-478-9601 

'includes urinalysis; other tests 
and immunizations extra. 

offer expires 6/30/98 



■ 



Feel Comfortable With 
Your Choice Of Doctor 




\n 



RafaAdi,M.D. 

Internal Medicine 1 

1 

Pleased to announce 

the opening 

of her office at 



Condell Medical Building 

6 Phillip Rd., Suite 1109 

Vernon Hills 

(847) 362-5344 



Adult Medicine 
I Health Medicine 



Sports Medicine 
Preventive Care 



Comprehensive Care forTeens and Adults 

On the Medical Staff at Condell Medical Center 






I 

9 



Health & Fitness Directory 1998 15 



lakeland Newspapers 



Many birthday gifts will last a lifetime, but a mammo- 
gram is an even better gift; it can extend a lifetime, perhaps 
yours. 

Recognizing that 90 percent of breast cancers can be 
treated successfully when detected early, the Cancer 

Research Foundation of 
America's goal is to encour- 
age women to schedule 
birthday mammograms for 
themselves and give a 
mammogram birthday gift 
certificate to a mother, 
daughter or friend. 

Despite the impressive 
advances in breast cancer 
research and treatment, 
ignorance remains our most 
feared enemy; CRFA is 
committed to banishing 
some of the breast cancer 
myths that kill. 

• Myth 1: Breast cancer can't happen to me. 

• Truth: All women are at risk of getting breast cancer. 

• Myth 2: Cancer can be caused by mammograms. 
•Truth: The level of x-ray radiation is negligible and repre- 
sents no real health threat. 

• Myth 3: Mammograms are painful. 

•Truth: The discomfort is minimal, especially when com- 
pared to the emotional as well as physical pain that follows 
when breast cancer is not detected at its earliest stage. 

• Myth '1: I don't need an annual mammogram, unless some- 
one in my family has had breast cancer. 

•Truth: Two-thirds of breast cancer diagnoses are made on 
women with no known risk factors. 



A birthday 
picture could 
save your life 




SUBURBAN 



We are pleased to 

announce that 
Dr. Mitchell Sheinkop 
of Midwest Orthopedics 
will be seeing patients 
on a regularly scheduled bas,s 
in our office. 



i 



BACK PAIN CAN STOP YOU 

FROM THINGS YOU LOVE TO DO 




You can cither trc-.it your symptoms or correct their muse. 
Find out him Chirupructk cull help you. 

With this ad your initial examination ami 2.fuU~sphiti 
x-rays mil be performed for $29 (normally a $195 fee.) 



IT'S YOUR CHOICE 



Dr. John I). Nikilmv. D.C. 

Center Square 

Chiropractic 

847-573-11272 



Dr. SU'wiirl Cites, D.C. 

Natural Health 

Chiropractic 

HA 7-367-7463 



m the Natural Health ( 'hiivpractic limhlinf* 
207 E. Park Ave., Liberty vitle. IL 60048 



DR. HOWARD R. BAKER 
DR. BRUCE D. HYMAN 

560 N.Midlothian Rd.#400 

(In the Condell Medical Building) 

Mundelein, IL 60060 

(847) 837-8440 



Remember wftew$0i£ 
dqctor had the time to 

It still exists. 



Early Morning, Evening & Saturday 
appointments available. 

Comprehensive Care 
for Teens & Adults 

•Preventive Care •Wellness Programs 

• Geriatrics • Sports Medicine 

• Women's Health 

On the Medical Staff at Condell Medical Center 



Id Health & Fitness Directory 1998 



lakeland Newspapers 



Essentials for the family first-aid kit: 
tips on what to do in an emergency 



Having a complete first-aid kit handy can save precious time 
in an emergency and enable you to take action immediately 
should one arise. 

Some of the essentials for an at-home first-aid kit should 
include aspirin -free pain reliever, cotton swabs, non-stick 
gauze pads with cloth tape, adhesive bandages, hydrogen per- 
oxide, rubbing alcohol, tweezers and antibacte- 
rial ointment. 

The following are some tips to quickly care 
for some of the most common emergencies.f 
rom cuts and scrapes to burns and bug bites: 

•Treat bee, wasp, ant, spider or mosquito 
bites by washing the area thoroughly and steril- 
ize with rubbing alcohol. Remove the stinger (if 
mere is one) with tweezers and apply a cold 
compress to ease swelling or pain. Apply bug- 
bitc medication or calamine lotion (to ease V 

itching) with a clean cotton swab. If excessive 
swelling or discomfort persists, consult a doctor. 

•Protect skin with sunscreen! Always protect skin with cloth- 
ing and sunscreen. If sunburn does occur, apply cool com- 
presses every few minutes until the heat of the burn diminish- 
es. Between compresses, apply moisturizing cream. If blisters 
appear, use a cotton swab to apply lotion or ointment to speed 
the healing process. 

•Rashes from poison Ivy and poison oak are not limited to 



/ \ 



any one season of the year. They are caused by contact with the 
oil of the plants' leaves or stems, and skin should be cleansed 
immediately. Hands and nails should be scrubbed carefully 
with a nailbrush or washcloth and soap to remove the oil and 
prevent spreading. Apply a nonprescription lotion like 
calamine or hydrocortisone to itchy areas with a clean, soft 

swab. Keep cool and comfortable — heat and perspi- 
ration generally make the itching worse. An oral 
antihistamine also helps relieve itching. 

•Clean cuts and scrapes with an antibacterial soap. 
Follow by applying hydrogen peroxide, and protect 
with an adhesive bandage. For a larger area, cover 
with sterile, non-stick gauze pads secured with 
adhesive tape. Re-apply hydrogen peroxide and use 
a fresh gauze pad daily. 

•To reduce the inflammation of minor burns, 
apply cool water. Dry the skin thoroughly and wrap 
loosely with a bandage. See your doctor immediate- 
ly for proper medical care. 

•When it comes to first-aid care, don't be stingy. If the pack- 
aging is torn on sterile bandages, buy new ones. Check for expi- 
ration dates on creams, ointments and medicines and replen- 
ish when supply runs low. Don't skimp on quality. For example, 
look for cotton swabs that have extra cushioning of 100 percent 
pure cotton at the lip for maximum softness, absorption and 
comfort. 



r J 

5 

I 

9 



In the generation of family values ... 

we value your family. 





NORTH 

SUBURBAN 

CLINIC 

Healthcare that's all about you. 



PEDIATRICIANS 

Gordon Wood, M.D. 

Bias Masri, M.D. 

Lisa Tybor, M.D, 

CmSTETRiqANS 
Milton Alter, M.D. 
Larmarr Tyler, DO. 

Dcbra Schlossberg, M.D. 

B. Michael Nagel, Jr., M.D. 



INTERNAL MEDICINE 

Nigel Wallers. M.D. 

Jose Kogan, M.D. 

Alan Aronson, M.D. 

GASTROENTEROLOGY 
Karen Sable, M.D. 

OPHTHALMOLOGY 
Mark Cabin. M.D. 



LABORATORY, X-RAY AND MAMMOGRAPHY 

Vernon Hills • 830 West End Court - 

(corner of Butterfield and Route 



DERMATOLOGY 
Bruce Kokon. M.D. 

UROLOGY 
Eric Dybal. M.D. 

SURGERY 

Upendranath 
Nimmagadda. M.D. 

ALLERGY 
Mark Miller, M.D. 

847.680.7900 

60) 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Health & Fitness Directory 199S 1 7 



Expert advice for busy mothers-to-be 

Today's mother-to-be has so many concerns beyond having a 
healthy baby. For the working woman, for example, crucial issues 
include job security, maternity policy and benefits, and future child 
care. Physically and emotionally, there are a variety of changes 
including mood swings, changes in appearance, fatigue, and the list 
goes on. These changes can be especially traumatic for a working 
woman who feels the pressure to look and feel her best on the job. 

Fortunately, a wealth of information and expert advice is avail- 
able to help ease expectant mothers through the transition. The 
revised and expanded edition of 77ie Pregnancy and Motherijood 
Diary: Planning the First Year ofYour Second Career, now available 
in bookstores nationwide, features a wide range of expert advice. 
For the busy mother-to-be who has both personal and professional 
responsibilities to juggle, the book also features a handy trimester- 
by-trimester appointment calendar. 





I 

\ 



THIS FOOT 



MARCHED IN 50 HALFTIME SHOWS 

KICKED A BULLY IN THE SHIN 

TESTED THE DATH WATER 

ENDURED 3,213 CHECKOUT LINES 

TAUGHT A SON HOW TO TWO-STEP 

STUBBED A TOE ON THE COUCH 



ATTEMPTED PLATFORMS, 

■:?': ■':■■■. 

riLETTOSANO NOLLE RBLADES 



STUBBED A 



THE COUCH AGAIN 

m 



LJ THEFOQ T 
CffiEiaiOUP 



Whatever your foot or ankle problem, 
we'll make sure your story continues. 




Dr. Steven N. Sharlin 

Board Certified - American Board of Pediatric Surgery 

Hawthorn Place Medical Center 

1900 Hollister • Suite 260- Libertyville I Vernon Hills 
Affiliated With Hawthorn Surgical Center 




estlake Clinic 



IgJCENTEGRA 




214 Washington Street • Ingleside, Illinois 60041 

(847) 587-3004 

Monday 9 am. to 7 p.m. ■ Tuesday • Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p,m. - Saturday 9 am. to 12 p.m. 

47 Managed Care Health Networks and Insurance Companies have Selected Westlake Clinic, 
Dr. William C. Dam and associates as providers of health services for their beneficiaries. 



COMPREHENSIVE 
SPECIALTY CARE 



ALLERGY: 

Dr. Roman Dykun 587-4700 

Dr. Christopher Standage 587-4700 



Hours By Appointment 

NEUROLOGY: 

Dr.M.Parikh 587-G00G 

Dr.M. Chumru 587-6006 



CARDIOLOGY: 

Dr.A.Amiry 587-9400 

Dr. S. Kadakio 587-9400 

DENTISTRY: 

Complete Family Care 

Dr. Richard Bernard 587-3020 

DERMATOLOGY: 

Dr. William Dam 587-3004 

EAR, NOSE, THROAT, 
FACIAL SURGERY: 



OB-GYNE: 

Dr. Boon Charocnying... .587-3015 

OPHTHALMOLOGY & 

EYE SURGERY: 

Dr. Robert Epstein 587-3012 

Dr. Cercesa Longest 587-30 1 2 

ORTHODONTICS: 

Dr. Wayne Mors 587-3020 

PODIATRY: 



Dr. Roman Dykun 587-4700 Dr. Lawrence Stockey 587-322 1 

Dr. Christopher Standage 587-4700 Dr . Hober , Polempa 587 . 32 2i 

FAMILY PRACTICE: 

Dr. Douglas Finlayson.... 587-4224 



GASTROENTEROLOGY: 

Dr. David Coy , 587-0024 

Dr. Philip Nagel 587-0024 

Dr. Dona Kortns 587-0024 

Dr. M. Bhuya 587-0024 



SURGERY: 

Dr. Michael Jacoby 587-0025 

Dr. Bosudcb Saha 537-3016 

Dr. David Ondrula ...587-0025 

UROLOGY: 

Dr. Robert Altmnn 587-3010 



INTERNAL MEDICINE & X-RAY DEPARTMENT: 

FAMILY PRACTICE: X .Rav 587-3000 

Dr. William Dam 587-3004 

Dr, Arun Narang 587-3015 

Dr. Victoria Spevak 587-3004 



• 20 Years In The Area • 25 Doctors & Specialists 
■ 1st Laser Surgery Unit In Lake County • MaylLab 



18 Health & Fitness Directory 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers 



It's lunchtime and you have to attend 
a meeting rather than your regular fitness 
workout. You think it doesn't matter, 
because you can always exercise tomor- 
row. But tomorrow comes and you have 
too much work to do. More days go by 
and you haven't worked out; something 
keeps getting in the way. You really 
enjoyed your exercise time and how you 
felt afterwards, but you just do not under- 
stand why you are not as motivated as 
you once were. 

Any number of factors can con- 
tribute to changing fitness habits, reports 
the President's Council on Physical 
ritness and Sports. One possibility is that 
you did not establish a clear direction or 
goal for your program. Realistic goals 
provide focus to an exercise program. 
They help you get from where you are to 
where you want to be. 

The goal— setting process is the 
same for physical fitness as it is for per- 
sonal and professional development. Attainable 
yoais help you understand what is possible out of 
many available options. Establishing goals brings into 
focus how your current fitness status relates to your 
ideal. 

Develop both long and short range goals. Long range goals 
are more general, but not all-encompassing. They should be 
achievable through a logical progression of activity. They do not 
need to have a time limit for achievement. 

.Short range goals identify the logical steps to achieving 
your long term goals. They should be very specific and realistic, 
based on your present capabilities and should have a time limit 



for achievement. Short term goals can 
be used to measure your progress. 

Remember to include all the compo- 
nents of fitness when setting your 
goals, cardiovascular fitness, muscular 
strength and endurance and flexibility. 
Take a few minutes to consider your 
fitness goals and write them down. 
Now you need a means to keep 
yourself focused on what you want 
to accomplish. One method is to 
make a contract with yourself. 
Contracts help you establish a sys- 
tem of accomplishments and 
rewards. First, list your short-term 
and long-term goals. Then, decide 
how to reward yourself for reaching 
each of your goals. Make the 
rewards special things that are 
important to you, something that 
you have always wanted. The more 
you value the reward, the easier it 
will be to accomplish the goal. 
Setting goals keeps you motivated to do 
what you should do on a regular basis. This is a 
very personal process. Everyone's goals will be slightly 
different. Your goals and rewards need to be right for you. 
Remember that goal— setting, like physical fitness, is an 
ongoing process. Each time a goal is achieved, set a new 
one. If you do not reach your goal within your set time 
frame, do not be discouraged. Reassess your status and set a 
new goal, either short or long range. Goal setting will help 
you maintain a consistent fitness program for the rest of 
your life. 




Workinffir 



Makes Cents. 




(and dollars.) 




Part-Time Package $ q rfl / K r 
Handlers Needed O . OU / 1 1 1 

ENJOY THESE BENEFITS... 

Comprehensive Medical Package • Paid Vacations & Holidays 

No Weekend Work • Work Mon.-Fri. 3-5 Hours Per Day 

LOCAltOm 
Hodgkins • Addison • Palatine • Northbrook 

1-888-4UPS-J0B 

1-888-487-7562 Access Code 4478 
www.ups.com 

Equal Opportunity Employei 



What's 
another word for 

Skilled? 



6 MANPOWER 

We have skilled healthcare professionals 

available for private duty nursing and 

staffing for clinics, hospitals, nursing 

homes and medical offices. 

847-856-1307 
www.manpower.com/lake 






u 
u 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Health & Fitness Directory 1998 19 



5 



Early Detection Vital to Managing 
Age-Related Macular Degeneration 

\ t _!_!_*__ f II*' " J ' T*_L , : . *% % f\rtn t»\ J .1 J _!*_ .. l_ — -1 «.. m *t Ut» ■ t^-i t\lnnwinl!i\n I ll rk f n 1 1 f\\ > f I n « pfnrvr 



Mundelein, Illinois, February 3, 1998- "Macular degener 
atiort is one of the mosi common causes of blindness in 
adults over 6,", says Dr. Elizabeth Dziuba at Look Sharp Eye 
Care Specialists in Mundelein. 

Dr. Dziuba explains:, As the eye ages, the macula, the 
most cell-rich section of the retina, can deteriorate. The 
macula provides central vision, essential for activities like 
reading, sewing and driving. Although peripheral vision 
usually remains unchanged, the loss of central vision is per- 
manent." 

It is not fully understood why some adults develop this 
disabling condition. We do know that the retina, the delicate 
inner lining of the eye that "sends pictures" to the brain, is 
very susceptible to any abnormality in its blood supply. It 
may also be related to aging, high blood pressure, smoking 
and exposure to high levels of ultraviolet radiation and blue 
light, both found in sunlight. It may also run in families* 
However, some recent research has indicated that certain 
antioxidant vitamins and minerals may help prevent or slow 
its progression. 

In some cases, laser treatment mav halt vision loss. The 



disease may be slowed by implementing the following steps: 

• eating a low-fat balanced diet; 

• asking your optometrist about dietary supplements; 

• wearing sunglasses that block 9'J to 100 percent of ultraviolet 
radiation and also screen out blue light: 

• keeping blood pressure under control; and 
•avoid smoking. 

Early detection is the key. If you are over 50, Dr. Dziuba at Look 
Sharp Eye Care Specialists, Ltd. recommends a thorough eye exam every 
year as part of your routine preventative health care. People should also be 
alert for the symptoms of macular degeneration and seek professional help 
immediately if they notice: 

■ a sudden loss of the ability to see clearly; 

• a gradual change in color vision; 

• distorted vision, such as wavy lines thai should be straight; 
and/or 

• a dark or empty area appearing in the center of vision. 
Look Sharp Eye Care Specialists. Ltd, is participating in the 

National Eye Health Education Program, a nationwide effort coor- 
dinated by the National Eye Institute to educate the public about the 
importance o\ preventive eye care, 



Come See for Yourself 

•EXCIMER LASER EYE SURGERY -COSMETIC FACIAL SURGERY 

•LASER SURGERY-UWnk/es, Acne Scars 

•COSMETIC BREAST SURGERY-/ :n/o/fj ( rnm[. Lifts 

•LASER EYELID SURGERY • LASER HAIR REMOVAL • LIPO SCULPTURE 




We offer a full range of cosmetic procedures in our comfortable and confidentall laser and cosmetic surgical centre. 
All sugries are performed by certified physicians In laser surgery opthalmology, occufoplastic, 

plastic and facial plastic and dermatology. 



RITAC C A 

LASER CENTER 
1900 Hollisler Dr. • Ubenyville, Illinois • 60048 • (847} 367/88 1 5 • fti.Y (847) 367-8819 



20 Health & Fitness Directory 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Do you smoke and take 
birth control pills? Do you take 
your antibiotic pill with a glass 
of milk or with an iron pill? Do 
you use a meat tendcrizer on 
your food while taking diuretics? 

Prescription medications are safe and 
effective by themselves, but they don't 
always mix well with other products we use 
every day. The following information is typi- 
cal of the helpful advice available from your 
local independent pharmacist. 

Food and Beverages 

Food and beverages can interact in three 
ways with prescription drugs. First, they can 
stop or diminish the action of the drug by 
preventing it from moving out of the stom- 
ach towards the bloodstream. People who 
swallow an antibiotic pill with milk may 
not get enough medicine into their blood- 
stream to stop the infection. 

If antibiotics are taken with coffee or 
fruit juice, the results can be just as bad. 
Chemicals in those drinks might destroy the 
dmg in the stomach. In most cases, it's best 
to take medicines with plenty of water. 
However, there are exceptions, so be sure to 
talk to your pharmacist. 

Second, some food-drug combinations 
can cause dangerous effects in the body. One 
of the most serious reactions occurs when drugs for 
depression (called monoamine oxidase inhibitors) are 
mixed with foods containing a chemical called tyramine. 
Putting the two together can cause very high blood pressure, 



DRUG INTERACTIONS: 

Some things don't mix 




headaches, vomiting and 
sometimes even death. The 
foods to avoid are common: 
some cheeses (such as 
Parmesan), red wine, choco- 
late, yogurt, bananas, yeast and others. 

Third, some drugs reduce the body's ability to absorb vit- 
amins and minerals from food. Diuretics, used to eliminate 
extra water from the body, also remove substances the 
body needs such as potassium and magnesium. 
Laxatives, antibiotics and other drugs can also stop 
vitamins from getting into the body. 
Some over-the counter products should not 
be mixed with prescription medication. Iron 
pills, for example, should not be taken at the 
same time as antibiotics. 
Cigarette smoke contains about four- hun- 
dred different chemicals that don't always mix 
well with prescription drugs. 



Alcohol Reactions 

Alcohol, including beer and wine, can trig- 
ger reactions with drugs of all kinds. When 
in doubt, don't drink alcohol If you are 
taking prescription medications without 
first checking with your doctor or phar- 
macist. 

According to NARD, the national 
association representing independent 
retail pharmacists, your chances of hav- 
ing a serious drug interaction are small if 
you ask your doctor or pharmacist for a list of 
items to avoid. Tell them about any other pre- 
scription and non prescription drugs you are taking, 
and read labels carefullv. 




ACHES 8 PAINS... 
PRESSURE 8 STRESS... 

Don't have to be part of 
your daily life anymore! 

Get better naturally. . . 
VCjZj^tlf the Naprapa th ic way! 

You may benefit from Naprapathic treatment 
if you are experiencing any of the following: 

• congestion • painful joints • headaches 

• digestive problems • poor circulation 

• exhaustion • severe stress 

• neck or arm pain • hip or leg pain 

• numbness in arms/legs 

• muscle tension/pain 

• pain betwe en shoulder b lades 

Kathleen A. Skoli, DM, C.T. 

9 N. Nippersink Blvd. 
Fox Lake, IL 60020-1413 

847*973*9050 



Friendly People... 
Friendly Advice 

"We will assist you with 
your home healthcare 

needs. Stop in for a Ron Far 7and, r.ph" 

free consultation." 




"Serving the Mundeteln 
Community Over 11 Years" 



FREE HOME DELIVERY, of PRESCRIPTIONS & SUPPLIES 



Complete Ostomy Center with Ostomatc on duty 

Mastectomy Department (large selection of forms, bras. Fitter 

on Duty) 

full line of home hcallh-carc equipment (wheelchairs, 

walkers, beds, canes and much more) 

Healthcare soft goods, including braces, splints, supports 

and compression stockings 

Pull diabetic tenter (strips, glucose machines, and 

patient education) 




wheelchair Serving the Community Over 40 Years 

Sf d 608 E. Hawley St. Mundelein, IL 

available 



Your 
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VISA I 



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® 



HOURS: 
Mon.-Fri, 

8-8 
Sat. 9-6 
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5 



<• 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Health & Fitness Directory 1998 21 




Sports Physical Therapy and Rehab Center cares 
about and treats the whole family 



! 



^ORfy we (QStfm ^IbcDUJd ^(Din9 






Sports Physic a\ Therapy & Rehab Center 

carta about and treats tfac whole family • 

from Grandma h Grandpa to Mom & Dad 

to the athlete and toddler 

You hare a choice for physical therapy services. 
Ask jour physician today for a referral. 



SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY & REHAB CENTER 



Center Street Square • 15 Commerce Dr. 
548-7782 ♦ GRAYSLAKE 



Fox take Commons • 2 W, Grand Ave* Ste 109 
973-9440 • FOX LAKE 



c We care for your: 

• Hack & Neck Pain 

• Sport & Work Injuries 
■ Arthrili.s/Bursitis 

• Orthopedic Injuries 

•Total I lip/Knee Replacement 

• Sprains and Strains 



<By providing: 

• Physical Therapy 

• Industrial Rehab 

• Hand Therapy 

• Occupational Therapy 

• Rehabilitation Programs 

• Post Surgical Rehab 



CALL US FIRST FOR YOUR 
INITIAL CONSULTATION 

Patients seen within 24 hours 

Convenient Hours 

Medicare Accredited Facility. Accepting most insurances. 

We'll help you with all ot your insurance/medicare paperwork. 

Other Convenient Locations 

1 



PADDOCK LAKE, WI 

(414)843-4200 



KENOSHA, WI 

{414)657-7071 



Dedicate Yourself to Better Health 

Agape Chiropractic Center 




1 







Dr. Jeffrey Malono j Dr, Kathleen Hufnagle 

"Living healthy and pain free is wha\ we're all about!" 

2\c> X. Milwaukee Ave. Lake Villa, II. 00040 (Nielsen Maza) 

(847) 35fi-i>6«>6 




Wauconda 

Wellness 

Clinic 



Physical Therapy 
& Rehabilitation 



Providing the highest quality of care for 

♦ Sports/Orthopedic Injuries 

♦ Work-related Injuries 

♦ Pre/Post-Operative Rehabilitation 

♦ Pediatrics through Geriatrics 

♦ Home Exercise Programs 



Saturday 

& 

Evening 

Hours 

Available 



(847) 
487-0290 



We accept; 
Most Insurance 
MBStercarrjWisa 

Medicare 
Workers Comp. 



3S3<Morth Main Street, Wauconda, 1L 60Dfr 



iiii 



V Gurnee 



$ 



& 




2 -»- 

i 









Sn. *A 



is » m 

3S.Greenleaf#A 
GURNEE 

(847) 263-6073 



■ Sports Medicine Specialist ■ Athletic Injuries 

■ Certified Athletic Trainer ■ Tendonitis 

■ Orthopedic/Surgical Care ■ Bunions 

of Foot and Ankle Disorders a Hammertoes 

■ Hfel/Arch Pain , Cal|uses 

■ Stress Fractures 

■ Shin Splints !1 Coms 

■ Runners Knee ■ ln 9 rown Nails 




Dr, Lisa Schoene, DPM, ATC 

[FRlE^olJSljLTATWtT] 

I X-Rays & Treatment not included I 

Lf1«iu frMnt»n tM« id »nin uhidulng ippointfMfli ■ j 
■ ^"" •«■» «■ mh ^h ^™ «J — 



22 Health & Fitness Update 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers 



INTRODUCING 

The Highlands 

at Lake Forest Place* 

A Continuing Cure Assisted Living Community. 

The Highlands at Lake Forest Place is part 
of Presbyterian Homes' new state-of-the-art 
continuing care retirement community. 
Located on forty-nine beautifully landscaped 
acres with lawns, gardens, and walking paths, 
The Highlands offers a supportive environ- 
ment while focusing on independence. In a 
comfortable home-like setting, residents are 
encouraged to be active and involved, know- 
ing that assistance is nearby if needed. 

As part of a continuing care assisted living 
community, a resident can take advantage of 
out-patient medical care, rehabilitation ser- 
vices, or licensed nursing care without leaving 
the building. Reservations for The Highlands 
are currently being accepted. Please call the 
fgfr Lake Forest Place Information Center 
==: at 604-8800, for additional information. 



<Z?f 



THE 

IGHLANDS 

AT- 



LAKE FOREST 
PLACE 




664 North Western Avenue 
Lake Forest, IL 60045 

(847) 604-8800 

□ I'm interested. Please send me more information. 

N.imf _^^^^^^^_^_^ 



! Sim- 1 



C'ny 



Mate 



zir 



I'hnlU- ( 



LL HEALTH <V9B 



A nonsectarinn member of ® Presbyterian Homes. 



Grandma's Secret 
Revealed 

Remember how your grandmother always had a piece of 
candy in her apron pocket just for you? Well, chances are you 
were just the lucky beneficiary of granny's condition. Dry 
moth, or as it is medically named Xerostomia, from the Greek 
xero (dry), and stoma (mouth), affects about three out of every 
10 adults. 

Aging is an important factor in the onset of Xerostomia, 
especially among women, it is not only an uncomfortable con- 
dition, but is one of the leading causes of tooth decay. Dry 
mouth can be caused by reactions to any of more than 200 
medications, as well as several illnesses, including cancer, 
Sjogren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, vitamin 
deficiencies and hypertension. 

As anyone who has been called upon to make an impromptu 
speech can attest, stress can cause the sudden onset of dry 
mouth, making speaking almost impossible. 

Resorting to candy and mints merely compounds the tooth 
decay problem brought on by diminished saliva production. 
Normal saliva is part of the body's antibacterial defense sys- 
tem. When there is insufficient saliva present in the mouth, 
bacteria tend to flourish. So, creating a sugar-rich oral environ- 
ment can cause devesting dental problems. 

Schaffer Labs of Pasadena, Calif., has introduced Salistat- 
Tabs, a saliva-inducing tablet. The citrus-based tablets contain 
no sugar and are buffered to protect the teeth. One tablet 
allowed to dissolve on the tongue will physiologically stimulate 
the salivary glands instantly for short-term relief. 



li 






A New Concept For 
Alzheimer's Care 

• Architecture and interior design based on the 
latest Alzheimer's research to enhance life quality. 

• Specialized programs for each level of care. 

• Staffed by Alzheimer's expens. 

• Twenty-four hour skilled care available. 

• Located on 20 beautiful, wooded acres in Lincolnshire. 
In Affiliation with Northwestern Alzheimer's Disease Center 

THE 





847/883-9000 

Please coil to discuss a personal plan of can' 

150 Jamestown Lino, Lincolnshire. Illinois 60069 

Alzheimer's Information Une (847) 883-WEAL (9325) 

www.wealshire.com 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Health & Fitness Directory 1998 23 




is key to fighting cancer 



The life expectancy of Americans 
has increased dramatically during the 
20th century, from 45 years for a person 
born in 1900 to more than 75 years for 
those born in 1989. 

Most of those gains in life expectan- 
cy have come from preventing illness, 
rather than trying to cure it once it 
develops. Preventive measures such as 
improved hygiene, better sanitation and 
widespread vaccinations have saved the 
lives of millions of infants and prolonged 
the lives of adults. 

For example, in just twenty years, 
vaccination programs have eradicated 
measles, a disease that once afflicted six- 
teen million people worldwide. And that 
was accomplished for less than what is 
spent in the United States every three 
months for removing gallstones. 

Other life-threatening diseases that 
have been virtually eliminated — not 
through new treatments but by prevent- 
ing their development in the lust place 
are polio, malaria, typhoid, whooping 
cough, vitamin-deficiency diseases and 
tuberculosis. 




. Why not cancer? 

When it comes to cancer, 
though, prevention has played 
far too small a role in our efforts 
to eradicate the disease that 
afflicts one million Americans 
and causes the deaths of 500,000 
Americans every year. 

As we mark National 
Cancer Prevention Month in 
April, we are reminded that 
research has shown that as 
much as 70 percent of cancers 
in this country are preventable. 
Yet America spends less than 
one-third of one percent of its 
$600 billion-a-year health care 
budget on prevention. 

And funding for cancer 
research is slipping. In 1989, 
only one-quarter of all grants 
approved by the National Cancer 
Institute were actually funded. 

While many organizations in the 
United States are chartered to help in 
the fight against cancer, only one has 
dedicated its efforts to prevention of 






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cancer— The Cancer Research 
Foundation of America. 

In just over five years since Its 
founding in 1985, CRFA has awarded 
nearly two— million dollars to fund 
cancer prevention research and edu- 
cational programs across the coun- 
try. 



r 




Health Syitem; Inc. of Illinois 

800/866-9600 

A ftill continuum of quality 

behavioral healthcare services 



Outpatient Clinic 

(heroica! Dependency lervicti 

Therapeutic Dj/ fell 

Rtsidcntia" Treatmem Ctntcri 

Partial Hospitalitation 

Community iervittt 

Hr«s Management HmMdpi 

Corporate Jenicrt 

(riili Intervention 

inpatient Irtatment 



rToparmfor: 

Parenting limes 

family Rdationihip Pattenti 

latin; Disorderi 

SulitanceAbute 

DeprfiitoMueening/JKanwnt 

Attention Deficit 

DisordtrDivor«R«owy 

Phyiical/JaualAbUK 

iuOffwdm 



We get results 




W$g^% Commitment 
ri$y To "E^ceCfence 



Sheridan Oieattfi Care Center 

Our commitment to residents is to give them professional care, 
administered by a compassionate and caring staff on 
an individual basis. 

We Offer: 
9. 24 Hour Nursing Ore ? Occupational Therapy 

ft" Rehabilitation Services * Hospice 

• including wheel chair anil walkers *' Respite/Vacation Care 
t Physical Therapy %■ |.y, Therapy 

%' Ventilator Cue 

Weattepl Medicaid; Kfedfcaw, VtU'wns, Private Insurance, and Private Party. Our Start 

Is hmwledgeable in state and federal regulations and will be ^IjU In jssi*i you in 

applying lor Medicaid or olher insur anre coverage, 

Sheridan Health Care Center 

253-1 Elim Avenue • Zion, 11. fiO(l'J f J-2677 
Fatiliiv 1147-746.8435 

t,u B47-74f»-1744 

ArfniHsloiis 1)47.731-4023 




24 Health & Fitness Directory 1998 



Lakeland Ncivs/mpers 



Seniors Can Keep Healthy Luster With 'Big Three': 

Exercise. Nutrition. Hydration 



A receni repdri on aging estimates that the United States already 
has more people over nu,e G5 then it has teenagers— and the num- 
lu-rs of those living well beyond the "golden years" are growing. Of 
those reaching age 65, HO percent are living to age 80. 
The extension of average lifespan had brought new chal- 
lenges for the aging — one of 

which is paying renewed atten- 
tion to leading a healthy 
lifestyle. For the elderly, that 
can make or break the 
chances of growing old 
"gracefully." 

Seniors are advised to pay ■ 
attention to the simple 
things, especially the "big 
three"— exercise, nutrition 
and hydration. 

Exercise Important 

A regular walking 
program is recorn- 
"'. ■ < mended. Studies 
% have consistently 
/ shown that walking 

on a regular basis 
can help lower the risk 
of heart disease and 
other chronic illnesses. 




jr 




x 



We Offer 

• 24 Hour Nursing 
Care by a licensed 
and earing staff 

• Three delicious 
meals served in our 
dining room 

• Special diets and 
snacks 

• Daily activities with 
frequent outings 



ILLCREST 

Nursing Center 



Itysical/Speech therapy 
Pastoral services 
Recreational 
therapy 

TV Hook-ups 
in every room 



It is our 

philosophy 

to do the best we 

can for our 

residents and 

tlieir famiiies 



COME VISIT US! 

847-546-5300 

1740 N. Circuit Dr. 
%. Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 



Good eating habits are another key to overall health. No more 
than 30 percent of calories should come from fat, for instance, and 
only 55 percent should come from carbohydrates. Protein should 
make up the rest. 

Seniors, like many young people, often overlook the easiest 
part of leading a healthy lifestyle: staying hydrated, or meeting 
the body's constant need for water. As people age, they face 
special challenges when it comes to hydration. Their thirst 
mechanism becomes less accurate and their body's ability to 
react quickly to heat or cold rapidly diminishes. This means 
seniors are more susceptible to illnesses such as heat stroke, 
cramps and exhaustion, which are caused by dehydration, 
often triggered by extreme temperature conditions. 

Some of the warning signs of heat- related illnesses and 
severe dehydration are involuntary muscle spasms, headache, 
dizziness, weakness and loss of consciousness. 

The best way for seniors to avoid these often life- threatening 
conditions is to drink ample amounts of water and limit time 
spent in extreme climates. Make a conscious decision to take 
in at least 2 1/2 to 3 quarts of water a day from all sources (liq- 
uids, solid foods). Of this amount, at least 1-2 quarts should be 
water itself. To make sure seniors get this "Minimum daily 
requirement" and to make sure they always have access to 
water, carrying bottled water is suggested, especially when 
temperatures pose a threat. 

As a precautionary measure, seniors should check with their doctor 
before they start any exercise, nutrition or hydration program. 



A- ALDEN S-- 

l » 

REHABILITATION AND HEALTH CARE CENTERS 



SETTING THE STANDARD FOR 
PERSONAL, PROFESSIONAL CARE! 

4 Skilled & Intermediate Nursing Services. 
4 Short or Long Term Stays. 

♦ Physical/Occupational and Speech Therapy 
7 Days A Week. 

♦ Private and Semi-Private Rooms, 

♦ Specialized Program, Including an Alzheimer's Unit. 
4 Admissions 7 Days A Week, 24 hours a Day. 

CONTACT OUR ADMISSIONS DIRECTOR 

Alden Long Grove Alden Terrace of McHenry 

Box 2308 RFD Old Hicks Rd. 803 Royal Drive 

Long Grove, IL 60047 McHenry, IL 60050 

(847)438-8275 (815)344-2600 



o A MEMBER OF THE ALDEN GROUP 



a 



Ltikeland Ncwspnpcrs 



Health & Fitness Directory 199S 25 



You're over 50? 



Don't settle for those boring, tasteless meals 



lane Weston Wilson . who describes 
herself as "sixty- five, fully alive and work- 
ing on my biceps." notes a common com- 
plaint among her friends who dine at the 
homes of younger family members or 
friends. "People tell me that they either 
come home from a dinner with a stom- 
ach-ache from eating rich foods that give 
them indigestion, or they come home 

rjt hungry, having eaten only a bland meal 

Si with no salt and no spices, followed by the 
inevitable compote of prunes." She 
believes a solution is overdue. 

A feast for all 

"Young people shoiddbe aware that mature adults often 
have special nutritional needs." Wilson says, "but that doesn't 
mean that the entire dinner party has to suffer boring food. 
Everyone can feast and without cooking separate meals." 

In herhighty praised book. Eating Well When You Can't 
Just Eat The Way You Used To, (Workman) Wilson provides a 
"Silver Palate" cookbook for the over-50 set. by presenting 
ideas that bring new flavors and flair to every-day cooking as 
well as special occasion entertaining. 

With more than 60 million people over the age of fifty in 




America, (and considering that today's bud- 
get-conscious entertainers are keeping the 
party at home), Wilson stresses that the 
book has particular value for younger peo- 
ple who regularly host dinners for their par- 
ents or older friends. 

Socializing with 
mom and pop 

"As sons and daughters get older, mom and 
dad often become friends as well as parents, 
and are increasingly included in their chil- 
dren's entertainment plans," she points out, 
adding that many households span three gen- 
erations as well. "Cooking for your parents can be as simple using 
five cooking techniques that automatically lower fat, cholesterol 
and calories." These favored methods are: steaming, poaching, 
sauteing, grilling or broiling, and baking. 

The key to eating well 

One key to eating well is eating lighter, and Wilson 
believes her lessons are equally healthy for the under- fifty set. 
"There is no reason for anyone of any age to get up from the 
dinner table feeling stuffed," she notes. 



NURSING CARE AS SPECIALAS 
THE PEOPLEWHO NEED IT. 

fllanoi^aze eHuealtli Sendees aj-j-eis-: 

•Shorr term rehabilitation and post hospitalization care 

•24 hour intermediate and skilled nursing care 

•Specialized Alzheimers unit 

•AJzheimers adult day care 

•Monthly support groups 

•Respite/Vacation stays 




G he Suppait ^Ijcut ilced 

ManorCare 

°rvv^ Health Services 




. N^ I 




j 




i 


? 
j 

4 
1 


_.-.- 







1 5CA Scum Milwaukee Ave, Licerr/viile 
847-816-3200 



Lake Knoll Health Care Center 

' . «..',,/ nuntn^ i.Kiiir. hafonng <nJ<f*nJftn.* *inj n:luihilir,iii>nt 

Otferinu Qualirv Geriatric and 

ReharJIIitationServices In a 

Supportive. Caring Environment 

♦> 24- Hour Nurses ♦ Wide Variety of 

Tasty. NutritionalMeals 

♦ Full Ramie of Therapies •> Safe and 

and fun spirited Activities Secure 

♦ Alzheimer's Programs 

Now Offering 
Adult Day Care Services 

♦Peace of mind for those Caregivers 
taking care of Elder relatives 

1- 5 day programming 

Medication Management 

Meal and Snack Included 

To Obtain Additional 
Information. Please Call; 

847- 295-3900 




26 Health & Fitnes< Directory 199$ 



Lake land \ T czv<paper$ 




How to find the doctors 
in this family portrait 

^5 .~-* r | J ust v ' s ' r tne nevv Healthcare Centers of Highland Park 
O Cd-jV • Hospital, located in Butterfield Square at Route 137 and 
Butterfield Road in Libertyville. These doctors, pictured above with the Michael 
Finley family of Libertyville, are now conveniently located, close to you, and give 
you access to the full resources of Highland Park Hospital, one of the area's finest 

medical centers: 

Biochemist Michael T. DiMuzio, Ph.D., Director, The 
Osteoporosis Prevention and Research Centers of Highland Park 
Hospital <2> Obstetrician/gynecologist Camela M. Harris, M.D. 
0> Family physician Matthew S. Plofsky, M.D., Lakeland 
Primary Care Associates <t) Internist/pediatrician Michael J. 
Unger, M.D., Lakeland Primary Care Associates Also at the 
Libertyville office: O Corporate Health O X-rays and other 
radiologic services O Laboratory facilities O Vision and hear- 
ing testing 





) ^f *-\ @W^i 


(® % 


>Y* jl fa csy\ 


1 


fAtACll . 



Healthcare Centers of Highland Park Hospital 

• 1419 Peterson Road • Li 

For information, call 847. 



Hn. 



Butterfield Square * 1419 Peterson Road • Libertyville Highland Park Hospital 

347.680.6990 A Member of Northwestern Healthcare 

www.hphosp.org 



<keland Newspapers 



Health Directory 1998 27 




Your Complete Source For Health Care 








• Cardiology 

• Dermatology 

• Endocrinology 

• Family Practice 



Gastroenterology 
General Surgery 
Infectious 
Diseases 




/ O0l€SiA> 



3471 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 




• Internal 

Medicine 

• Nutrition 

• OB/GYN 



Occupational 
Medicine 

Orthopedic 
Surgery 



Ophthalmology 
Pediatrics 
Podiatry 
Psychology 



Information & Appointments 

4734357 

Hours 

Mon-Fri 9:00-6:00 • Tues 9:00'8:00_ 



® 



7997 Fmch UnivmUy of H«l.h Sciences / The Chkafi« Medial School 




Psychiatry 
Reproductive 
. Endocrinology 
Rheumatology 



• Reproductive 

- Immunology 

• Urology 

• Vascular Surgery 




CLINICS 

3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 




... 

... . •. 



BANK & FINANCE 

How to read your credit 
report— and correct it /B13 



HEALTHWATCH 

Two local women meet Weight Watchers 
spokesperson 'Fergie' in New York / B14; 



MOVIE REVIEW 

Paul Newman still sizzles 
in his 70s in Twilight* / B6 



Lakeland 
Newspapers 

March 13 
1998 




Local wrestlers working on their dream in the ring 



By l£ON F1LAS 
Staff Reporter 



heir movements 
are a combination 
of grace and power 



T 

I T"U«*,r«™,««r rt ,,«^ and more fans, wrestling's in one of 

-L They move around Uspeakyears/ . 

the ring, graceful in their Proof is in the pudding as PWA 



fessiona! wrestler with 1 7 years of 
experience under his belt 

"Wrestling's in good shape right 
now," Rodgers stated. "With the 
WWF (World Wrestling Federation) 
and the WCW (World Champi- 
onship Wrestling) bringing in more 



ability to fly through the 
air, powerful in the impact 
that's felt when one mas- 
sive body slams into the 
other. 

This is the training ground. The 
place where it all begins for local 
area wrestlers trying to make it to 
the big time. 

Men from the area are trying to 
make it to the ex- 
treme in their 
sport. They are 
trying to become 
professional 
wrestlers. 

"It's a combi- 
nation of luck 
and skill that cat- 
apults you to the 

top in this profession," said "Tomb- 
stone" Kevin Steele, backstage before 
his main event. "I'm getting there." 

Steele, who's been wrestling for 
a little over a year now, is a 
Grayslake resident (though he says 
he's from Tombstone Arizona,) 
looking to make it big in profession- 
al wrestling. He's on the verge of 
breaking through into the full-time 
ranks and is considered to be one of 
the top contenders in the Profes- 
sional Wrestling Association. 

The PWA was started nearly 5 
years ago by Sunny Rodgers, a pro- 



holds a once a month event around 
the Chicagoland area. In May, they 
will be coming to Waukegan for an 
event in which King Kong Bundy, an 
ex-superstar wrestler from the WWF 
weighing well over 400 pounds, is 
scheduled to make an appearance. 

"The future of wrestling is 
bright," Rodgers continued. 
"There's a couple df-guys out the 
there looking to hold the future of 
wrestling in their hands." 

That could mean Steele, and oth- 
er local wrestlers like 
Ron Creek of McHen- 
'What I do isn't fake or ry, "Bad Boy" Rob 



staged, Wliat J do 
hurts people/ 

Kevin "Tombstone" Steele 



MottaofZionand"Big 
Time" Kirby Duck of 
Waukegan could have 
a future in it. 

"Right now, it's 
just fun for me," 
Steele said. "It's fun 
to go out and stand in front of the 
crowd, all of them chanting your 
name. It's a thrilling moment." 

Though wrestling has been de- 
noted as being fake and staged in 
the past, many of the wrestlers deny 
the allegations. 

"What I do isn't fake or staged," 
Steele stated, "Wliat 1 do hurts peo- 
ple. 1 am an athlete in the best shape 
of my life." 

Creek, who also has been 
wrestling for a little over a year, 
shows the battle scars of a match 
with Steele. A lump the size of a can- 



taloupe sits on his elbow, left there 
from a Steel Body Slam on a hard- 
wood floor. 

"(Steele) did that just last week," 
Creek stated, pointing at the lump. 
"And 6 weeks ago, I tore all the carti- 
lage in my ribs. I'm living proof the 
stuff were doing out there is real.". 



"When I jump off the top rope 
and land on someone, they can feel 
it. How can that be staged," Rodgers 
helped. 

Eventually, the lights in the am- 
phitheater dimmed while the stage 
lights came up. 300 people in the 
Hemmon's Auditorium in Elgin 



started screaming and cheering, - 
waiting for the action to happen. ' 

Kevin's eyes grew as big as 
saucers as he looked out over the 
crowd and smiled at his cheering 
and adoring fans. " 

"This is what it's ail about," 
Steele smiled. "The fans." 








Top: "Tombstone" Kevin Steele holds the Midwest Championship belt over his head prior to his bout 
with Ron Creek. Above: Steele hits Creek in the Midwest Championship, in which Creek came away 
with the title.— P/iotos by Leon Filas 






im 



_— 



B2 /Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



March 13, 1998 



r 



PROVEN, EFFECTIVE 





VOTE 

PHIL CRANE 

REPUBLICAN 
MARCH 17™ 



• 

Promises, promises. That's all you hear from candidates these days 
and, if they get elected, you wonder if the candidate and the office- 
holder aren't different people. In the 8th Congressional District, 
you can judge one candidate on performance — his record speaks 
for itself. PHIL CRANE has... 

* NEVER voted to increase your tax burden. PHIL CRANE 
was a leader in the successful effort to pass the 1997 
Taxpayer Relief Act, which provided a tax credit for 
families with children, cut capital gains, inheritance 
and small business taxes and expanded IRAs. 

* Voted to cut spending, reduce the size of government, 
and keep government out of our daily lives. 

* Consistently fought for the family and family values. 

* Stood up for our basic constitutional rights. 

Because of his consistent record he routinely receives the top 
awards from ... 

* The National Federation of Independent Business 
•k The Watchdogs of the Treasury 

* The National Taxpayers Union 

Because he is a leader in Congress he was named... 

* "Friend of Business" by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce 

* "Taxpayers Hero" by Citizens Against Government Waste 

* "Super Friend of Seniors" by the senior group 60 Plus 

And because he has kept the faith with his constituents... 

* Every Republican Township Organization that endorsed 

in the 8tn Congressional District endorsed PHIL CRANE — 
Avon, Barrington, Cuba, Ela, Elk Grove, Fremont, Hanover, 
Lake Villa, Newport, Schaumburg, Warren, Wauconda, 
and Wheeling. 



Paid for by Crane for Congress Committee P.O. Box 8534, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-8534 Phone: 847-991-7445 



ELECT THE LAWMAN 



,'i 



A tough, experienced LAWMAN 

IftT 28 yEARS EXpERiENCE... 

All In jUe 1_a!<e County SlHERiff's Department. 

W FiRST CHAIRMAN of tIhE BoARcL, 

fof Major Crjme TAsk Force. 

W ServecI iN EVERy CApACiTy... 

PatroI DivisiON, ChiEF of Detectives, ChiEf 
of Operations, CommancIecI t^e Marine Unit, 

UNdERSliERiff. 
W AsSUMEd full RESpONSibiliTiES f0R fORMER 

SkERiff CliNTON GmnimeII's duTiEs duRiNq Iris 

AbsENCE. „*•/! 




A LAWMAN with Progressive Ideas 

w EteiNq bAck Crime Stoppers to tIhe SkERiff's OfficE 
W Create a Domestic VjoIence llNif. 

lk SEEk fuNdiNq Irom FEdERAl Government to 
pRovidE tIhe GANq Resistance EducATioN 
PRoqRAM (GREAT) 

W AssiqN DEpuTy ShERiff's to tIhe UkE CouNTy 
Gan<^ TAsk Force. 

IrT REASsiqN personneI to NEiqlnboRhood 
PatroI DuTy. 



; SMITH 

EXPERIENCE! 

The Prime Ingredient For A Great Sheriff 

Don't Vote until you've compared the experience of the Candidates.. .Then 




Willie Ray 








I 



i 



Sheriff of Lake County 



March 13, 1998, 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B3 






KID'S FARE 



Go behind the scenes at 



Get an up-close look on Sat- 
urday and Sunday, March 
14 and 15 at the Milwaukee 
County Zoo. Visitors will 
have the rare opportunity to sneak a 
peek from a different angle when 
Equitable presents Behind The 
Scenes Weekend at the Zoo. 

Each day from 10 a.m. to 2:45 
p.m. several locations around the . 
Zoo will be open to the public for 
tours. Visitors will gain insight into 
the everyday life of Zoo animals and 
learn about ongoing research. The 
following areas are included in the 
toun Aviary, Primates of the World, 
Aquatic & Reptile Center (ARC), 
Small Mammal Building.Winter 
Quarters, Camel Barn and Pachy- 
derm Exhibit The Hospital and 4 
Commissary located on the south 
end are accessible by Zoomobile 
shuttle only. 

A safari by Zoo guides, Zookeep- 
er^staff, and Zoo Pride volunteers 
will take visitors on educational 
tours through all nine locations to 
explore what goes on behind the 
scenes. Some Zoo locations on the 
tour are not handicapped accessi- 
ble. Visitors will be able to see ani- 
mals in their surroundings as well as 
peek in on the care that goes on be- 
hind the scenes. 

All lours are included in the reg- 
ular Zoo admission and are given on 
a first come, first served basis. Ad- 
mission is $6.50 for adults, $5 for se- 
niors (60 years and older) and $4.50 
for juniors (3 to 12 years old). Cost of 
parking is $5. Milwaukee County 
residents with proper ID. receive 
$1.50 off regular Zoo admission. 

For more information, call (414) 
256-5412. 



Festival of Balloons 
is on its way 

Hundreds of balloon artists 
from around the world will 
appear at the 14th Annual 
Festival of Balloons on 
Sunday, March 15, from 11 a.m. to 3 
p.m. at the Hyatt Regency O'Hare, . 
9300 West Bryn Mawr Ave., Rose- 
mont. 

Twenty larger-than-life balloon 
sculptures— some animated, some 
with music— will be on display as 
part of the 14th annual Internationa] 
Balloon Arts Convention. One 
sculpture can include more than 
10,000 balloons. - 

In addition, balloon entertainers 
will design small balloon figures — 
on the spot— available for purchase. 
Last year, more than 6,000 people . 
attended the event. 

Admission is $4; children 12 and 
under are free. For more informa- 
tion, call (773) 380-4941. 

Eat with the 
anjmals at Shedd 

Shedd Aquarium is hosting 
"Breakfast with the Animals" 
every Saturday during March. 
This special early morn- 
ing program gives Shedd guests a 
unique opportunity to see the ani- 
mals as they wake up and begin 
their day. Guests can meet the 
Aquarium's marine mammal 
trainers and learn about the day's 
featured animal. Afterward, guests 
will enjoy a scrumptious, all-you- 
can-eat breakfast at Shedd and 
can then tour the Aquarium for 
the entire day. 

Featured animals at breakfasts 



are: March 14, Pacific white-sided 
dolphins; March 21, penguins; 
March 28, beluga whales. 

Breakfast begins at 8 a.m. Each 
program also offers arts and crafts 
projects for kids, such as creating 




fun fish hats. 

Spaces are still available for 
breakfast programs. Tickets are $21 
for children ages 3-11 and seniors; 
$25 for adults. Children under the 
age of 2 are admitted free. To make 



a reservation or for more informa- 
tion, contactShedd Aquarium at 
(312) 692-3333. Reservations are 
required. Guests should enter . 
through the South Oceanarium 
entrance. 




JUST FOR KIDS! 

FuhF actorv 



Fill in the blanks below, and 
discover 12 activities that 
can help people stay fit. 

1. _WI_MING 

2. _ALJNG 

3.'rV NN_NG 

Buiqo)3Jjs "Zi 'Bup)!H 
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Health Fill-in 

4. _EN_I.S. 

5. _YC_ING 

6. G_LF 

7. _YMN_STI_S 

8. _ALL_T 

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10. S_ATI_G 

11. HIJNG 

12. TR TC ING 



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SJBMSUy 






IN THE ANCIENT ROMAN CALEN- 
DAR, THE 15TH DAY OF MARCH IS 
KNOWN AS THE IDES OF MARCH. 





^ 



WHILE MANY BELIEVE 
THAT AN OSTRICH 
BURIES ITS HEAD IN THE 
SAND TO HIDE, THIS 
BIRD ACTUALLY HIDES BY 
SITTIHO WITH ITS HEAD 
AND HECK STRETCHED 
OUT ON THE GROUND. 




HOW THEY 
SAY IT IN... 



ENGLISH! TJH 
SPANISH: DIEZ 
ITALIAN: PIECI 
FRENCH: DIX 
GERMAN* ZEHN 
LATIN: DECEM 




HOROSCOPE 



Aries- March 21/Aprt! 20 
While you know it's not the best time, you say how 
you really feel at an important meeting. Even though 
tt adds to the tension, those involved respect your 
opinion. An evening out with friends gets a little row- 
dy. Try to stay calm, and keep others under control. 
Virgo plays an important role. 

Taurus -April 21/May 21 

You end up Deing the bully when it comes lo a fam- 
ily problem early in the week. No one wants to listen 
to reason, so you just take control of the situation. 
While everyone will be mad at you for a while, they 
soon realize that you did the right thing. A close 
friend opens up lo you. Be there for him or her. 

Gemini- May 22/June 21 
You're going to have lo think fast on your feet when 
a sure thing goes awry. Don't let the mishap throw 
you. Try to make a sound decision. The person 
you've been seeing wants to step up the relation- 
ship. Think about what you really wanl before you 
say yes. Libra plays a key role on Friday. 

Cancer- June 22/July 22 
Your sense of humor gets you through a tough 
week, Cancer. You have a lot going on at work and 
at home. Dont let things get lo you; try to laugh them 
off. It's the only way lo keep a good attitude. A close 
friend has a surprise for you. Show your apprecia- 



tion — even though you don't really like it It's the 
though! that counts. 

Leo - July 23/August 23 

You end up being the center o! attention at a work 
function. While you enjoy it, remember that your su- 
periors are watching you. Don't let things get out of 
hand. The person you've been seeing stops calling, 
Before you start blaming yourself, talk to him or her 
to find out why it's over. It will give you the closure 
that you need. 

Virgo- Aug 24/Sept 22 

You're in the right place at the right time at the end 
of the week, Virgo. Your good nature impresses an 
influential person, who offers you a business propo- 
sition. Look Into the facts before saying yes — biri 
don't rule it out immediately. A loved one needs a 
shoulder to cry on. Show that you care. 

Libra- Sept 23/Oct 23 

While you halo to be rude to others, it's the only way 
you're going to get people to slop bothering you this 
week. You have a lot to do, and people are counting 
on you to get things done. You need lo do what it 
takes to be productive. That special someone calls 
you unexpectedly. Don't be nervous; it's nothing se- 
rious. Leo plays a key role late in the week. 

Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 



While you normally don't wear your heart on your 
sloerve. you just cant horp It this week, Scorpio, You 
meet an Intriguing stranger wiih a captivating per- 
sonality. Be yourself, and you're sure lo win his or 
her heart. A mend needs your help. Even though it 
comes at a bad time, you have to be supportive. 
Your efforts will be appreciated. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 

Keep your mind on the task at hand early in the week. 
It's very important, so dont let your thoughts wander, 
Stay focused, because others are relying on you to get 
the job done. A family evening that has been planned 
for weeks doesn't work out Don't get upset 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 
Don't be shy when meeting an interesting person late 
in the week, Carjricom. He or she can help you with a 
financial situation if you play your cards right Howev- 
er, he or she has to gel lo know you first A dose friend 
needs you to be his or her date for a business dinner. 
Say yes; it's not going to be as bad as it seems, 

Aquarius - Jan 21/Feb 1 8 
Don't overanalyze an argument with a dose friend. 
You two always have had your differences. Don't 
worry; your relationship is as strong as ever. That 
special someone invites you to dinner. Say yes — 
even though you have lo rearrange your schedule 
for it: II means a lot lo him or her. 

Pisces- Feb 19/March 20 
A co-worker needs your help. Don't shy away from 
him or her. It really is an important matter. Help him 
or her get whal he or she rightfully deserves. Friends 
invite you out lor a night on the town. Enjoy yourself 



CROSSWORD 





INTENT FOR 
THE CHILD 

•Exploration 

'• independence 
• Responsibility 



Come Visit Us! 



OPEN HOUSE Saturday, March 14, II am - 1 pm 



OLD 

SCHOOL 

MONTESSORI 

A Traditional Montessori School 

• Ages 3 to 12 

• Program Plus Available Before and 
After School, 7 am to 6 pm 

• Experienced Montessori Directresses, 
AMI & AMS Certified 

• Extensive Curriculum 



New Facility Opening F3II 1999 



LOCATKfl* WIS tflt AYSLAKK 

IOI5 North 4>oi'|»<»rttte Circle 

iit 17) 223-4MMM» 




Clues ACROSS 

1. Cardiograph 
4. Italian island 
8. Fissure 

12. Normal standard 

13. Crucifix 

14. Uncommon 

15. Flowers 

17. At all times 

18. Duck 

19. Nip 

20. Middle 

22. Herb^, San 
Francisco columnist 

23. Watered 

24. Yells 

27. Deers 

28. Insect 

29. Spelling or quilting 

30. Express disapproval 

31. Equid 

32. Loved 

33. Set 

35. Woman's name 

36. Call out somebody's 



name 

37. Hungarian violinist 

38. Company officer 
40. Calming 

44. Dagger 

45. Enthusiasm 

46. Tag 

47. Italian tourist city 

48. Beget 

49. Armament 

Clues DOWN 

1 . Environmental 
Protection Agency 

2. Bathroom, slang 

3. Maintenance men 

4. Fell into decay 

5. Individualist 

6. Dutch colonist 

7. Publicities 

8. Yarn used in 
embroidery 

9. Irrelevant 

10. Region 

1 1 . Look up 



16. Arachnids 

19. Samoan 
monetary unit • 

20. Cooks . 

21. Ancient Greek 

22. Boletus 

24. Plant 

25. Depdve 

26. Dry 

28. Can't move 

31. Million 

32. Fast 

34. City in Sweden 

35. Allman brother 

37. Calendar month 

38. Automatic data 
processing 

39. Twelve 

41. _ Lilly, drug 
company 

42. Sixth letter of 
Hebrew alphabet 

43. One point north 
of due east 



answers: 



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NMOOSNOlimOS 

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Ajauoas *E2 jearj - ec ojefl 

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uaeo72 jaiuaooe ^awy/ei 
jgpig si J0A3 '11 sauoujouv 
'91 3Jey 'H pooa 'El J*d 

Z\ dEMoa eqi3> 903*1 

ssouov sNoumos 



B4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



March 13 t l$98 



THEATRE 





Learning Fund hosts 'Fiesta!' benefit 



Left to right, Mickey Rooney, 
Jessica Grove and Eartha Kitt 
star in the stage production of 
"The Wizard of Oz." 



'Wizard of Oz' 

Tickets are on sale for "The Wizard 
of Oz'* at the Roscmont Theatre, March 
21 to April 5. Mickey Rooney and Eartha 
Kitt star In the stage production of the 
1939 movie classic. 

The stage play unfolds In a black- 
and-white setting, the same imagery as 
the original movie. As Kansas is struck 
by the tornado and Dorothy's house 
settles in Muncbklnland, a kaleidoscope 
of color surrounds the audience. 
Dorothy then begins her journey 
through Oz, encountering Glinda the 
Good Witch, the citizens of 
Munchkinland, The Wicked Witch of 
the West and (he Wizard, himself. 

Rooney, portraying the Wizard, is 
a film veteran who has twice been 
nominated for an Academy Award. 
Bartha Kitt is a veteran of stage, 
screen, cabaret and the recording 
industry, and is one of a handful of 
performers to be nominated for a 
Tony, an Emmy and a Grammy. 
Jessica Grove, 15, from Columbus, 
Ohio, portrays Dorothy. 

Performances of "The Wizard of 



The Learning Fund wiil host its annu 
al benefit, "Fiesta!" on Saturday, March 
14 at the Marriott's Lincolnshire Resort. 
Through this event, the Learning Fund 
will seek to strengthen its partnerships 
with community members and area 
businesses. The evening will feature both 
live and silent auctions to generate funds 
for educational programs which bene- 
fit District 103 students. In addi- 
tion to the auctions, the evening 
will include a "South-of-the- 
Border" buffet dinner, music 
and dancing. 

"Fiesta!" will begin at 7 
p.m. in the Grand Marquee 
Tent. The silent auction will 
be open until 9:30 p.m., at which 
time the live auction will begin. A 
number of unique items will be fea- 
tured in die auctions, including the 
following: signed Chicago Bulls 
basketball; "honorary" bat boy or 
girl for the Chicago White Sox; 
four tickets "first row off the floor" to the Chicago 
Bulls versus Detroit game on March 31; eight box 
seats behind the home dugout for Chicago White 



CHECK 
IT 




Sox versus Milwaukee game on June 17; 
"soup-to-nuts" dinner for 10 at Aspen 
Grille; and Chicago sports team memora- 
bilia. In addition, the District 103 P.T.O. 
and the Half Day School fourth grade 
teachers will donate several Illinois quilts 
for auction. These quilts are unique in 
that classroom students create the many 
quilt squares. Proceeds from the quilt . 
auction will add to the annual Oscar T. 
Bedrosian Memorial Scholarship 
Award fund, 

With money raised from its ben- 
efit last March, the Learning Fund 
awarded grants to establish a 
School District math/science lab at Half Day 
. Qt> School and an extended 

DKIIMr w , Mn artist-in-rcsident program at 
LEARNING FUND j^ura B. Sprague School. 

Funding for these types of pro- 
grams has historically been beyond the 
reach of school district operating budgets. 
Funds raised at this year's benefit will support 
more innovative and enriching programs for 
District 103 students. 

For more information, call Betsy Cornell at 
948-5457. 



Oz" are scheduled beginning Tuesday, 
March 24 and continuing to Sunday, 
April 5. 

Ticket prices range from $29.50 to 
S49.50. To charge tickets by phone, call 
(312) 559-1212. For group information, 
calf (8-1 7) 671-9800. 

'Elmer Gantry 7 

Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre 
presents the Chicago premiere of a 
major new musical, Hlmer Gantry. The 
show nms through March 22 and stars 
Broadway's Tom Zcmon (Les 
Misurables) and Kerry O'Malley (Cyrano 
the Musical). 

Either Gantry is based on Sinclair 
Lewis' Pulitzer Prize-winning novel and 
Academy Award-winning film. In the 
dusty backwater towns of the Midwest 
in ih 1930s, Sister Sharon Falconer's 



J 



two-bit traveling salvation show strug- 
gles to save souls and meet expenses. 
Enter the fast-talking, good-looking 
Elmer Gantry, salesman and con man. 
Me turns Sister Sharon's world upside 
down and starts saving souls with show- 
biz savvy and greedy know-how. But 
what he really wants, money can't buy. 
His smoldering desire for the beautiful 
Sister Sharon ignites into a blazing 
inferno threatening to consume them 
both. The only thing left to save is his 
own soul. 

Performances arc Wednesdays at 2 
and p.m.; Thursdays at p.m.; 
Saturdays at 5 and 8:30 p.m.; and 
Sundays nt 2:30 and 7 p.m. Tickets are 
S33, with $5 off to senior citizens and 
students for certain pcrfonnanccs. 
Reservations can be made by calling the 
box office at C34-0200. 



'Grease!' 

Put on those leather Jackets and 
bobby socks! Tickets arc on sale to see 
Frankic Avalon in "Grease!, "one of the 
greatest phe- 
nomenon of 
American 
musical the- 
atre, at the 
Roscmont 
Theatre, 
through 
March 15. 

Written by 
Chicagoanjim 

Jacobsand Frankfe Avalon 

Warren Casey, "Grease!" is the 1950s 
story of Rydell High Schoolers Danny 
Zuko. and Sandy Dumbrowski, the 
wholesome, naive transfer student 
whose life changes forever thanks to the 




Influence of the tough-talking Rizzo, 
leader of the Pink Ladles gang. The 
show Is filled with such hits as "Greased 

Ughtnin," "Summer Nights," "Bom to 
Hand Jive," and "We Go Together." 

Following every performance of 
"Grease!," Frankie Avalon will perform a 
20-minute concert, crooning such 
favorites as "Venus," his 1959 recording ; 
which held the No. 1 position on the 
pop charts for 17 weeks. Thirty minutes 
prior to curtain, greaser DJ extraordi- 
naire Vlncc Fontaine will host a pre- 
show party, spinning golden oldies, tak- 
ing dedications, and inviting audience 
members to dance on stage. 

Avalon revives his role as the Teen 
Angel from the 197B hit movie-musical. 

Ticket prices range from $24.50 to 
$49.50. To charge tickets by phone, call 
(312) 559-1212. For group information, 
COJ1671-9BO0, 

'Do Not Go Gentle' 

The youngest Kirk Player, IC-year- 
old Megan GunUier, and guest per- 
former, 12-year-old Clinton Brcsley, will 
play major roles In the third play of The 
Kirk Players' 
32nd season, 
"Do Not Go 
Gentle." 

Susan L 
Zeder's come- 
dy/drama will 
be presented at 
B p.m. on 
Friday and 
Saturday, 

March 27 and 28, Megan Gunther 
In the 
Mundelcin 
High School 
auditorium. All 
proceeds from 
the production 
will be split 
between the 
Amy Cummins 
Scholarship 
Fund and Boy 
Scout Troop 198. Clinton Bresiey 

Megan is a 
second-year Player whose roles had been 
In the Players' children's shows, Includ- 
ing this season's "The Spell of Sleeping 
Beauty," In which she played a good 
witch. Young Breslcy has been a guest 

Please turn to iiextfxige 





NEWS 1220 




THE TALK OF LAKE COUNTY 



Introduces... 



SportsTalk 

with 

Anthony 
Morgan! 




Join NEWS 1220-WKRS and 
former Chicago Bear and Green Bay 

- Packer Anthony Morgan with 
WKRS Sports Director Pat Cameron... 

Weekdays from 1 p to 2p! 

Anthony tells Lake County 

"how it is" in pro sports... 

giving listeners his unique 

views on current events 

in the sports industry! 



Other sports talk shows specialize in 
the "arm-chair quarterback"...the host 
who wishes he had made the big time. 

ANTHONY MORGAN HAS BEEN 

THERE! SEVEN YEARS IN THE NFL! 

And he wants to talk to you! 

Participate in the discussion! 
The phone lines are open at... 

244-1220! 



March 13,1998 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/ B5 



performer In several Kirk children's 
shows and was a Palace Guard and 
drummer in the Sleeping Beauty produc- 
tion. Both youngsters are facing major ; 
performance challenges, as they play the 
roles of their young lives In "Do Not Go 
.Gentle." 

Also in the cast is Johanna 
Thomson of Vernon Hills as Lillian, an 
84-ycar-oldvibrant,-funny, wise and 
recently deceased grandmother. After 
her death, Lillian discovers that she can- 
not "move on" until rifts with her son, 
Windsor (Patrick Blake of Ubcrtyville) . 
and her granddaughter/ Kelly (Megan) 
are somehow mended. ' 

Tickets are $6 for adults and $3 for 
senior citizens over 65, and children 
under 12. They can be purchased at the 
door, from members of Boy Scout Troop 
198, the Amy Cummins Scholarship 
Fund, or from Kirk Players themselves. 
For more information, call 566-6594. 



ART . 



Art exhibit 

Celebrate Black Heritage Month at 
the National Vietnam Veterans Art 
Museum, 1801 S. Indiana Ave., Chicago, 
featuring the current artworks of three _ 
of the museum's African-American 
artists: Farris Parker, Ulysses Marshall 
and William Myles, View over 40 works 
of non-Vietnam art in oils, acrylics and 
waiercojors. The exhibit runs through 
April 30. For more information, call 
(312} 326-0270. 




A scene from Walt Disney's 
masterpiece, "Pinocchio." 

Art of Disney 

StayTooned Galleries has 
announced that its 7th Annual Vintage 
Disney "Cabin Fever" exhibition enti- 
tled "The Art of 1940...Disney's 1940 
"Pinocchio" and "Fantasia." The show 
runs through April 15. 

Over 100 never before seen Walt 
Disney Studio hand painted production 
cells, animated drawings, concept 
drawings and storyboards, as well as 
Disney Studio Animators model sheets 
will be on display from these two his- 
toric films. Also included in the exhibit 
will be rare, never before seen artworks 
from Snow White, Bambi, Song of the 
South, Cinderella. Peter Pan and Lady 
and the Tramp. 

For more information, call 382-2357. 



MUSIC 



Concerts closing out 

Lake County Community Concert 
Association is closing outs its 1997-98 
series with two outstanding programs. 
On April 4 at 8 p.m., Khenany, a Latin 
American native music ensemble, will 
perform. On April 26, at 3 p.m., the 
Bulgarian Children's Chorus will per- 
form. All concerts will be held in the 
Waukcgan High School auditorium, 
Brooksidc and McAree. 

Tickets for the scries are $50 ($25 
for students through high school age) 
and can be purchased at the door or by 
calling Donna Fortney at 244-7465. 
Family subscriptions (two adults and all 
students at same address) arc $125. 



DANCE 



Dance company performs 

Marcus Center for the Performing 
Arts will present the world- renowned 
Georgian Stale Dance Company for one 
performance on Sunday, March 15 at 
7:30 p.m. in Ulhlcln Hall, 929 North 
Water St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

The Georgian State Dance 
Company has traveled the world, 
thrUling audiences In such nations as 
Romania and Denmark, and lighting up 
such famous venues as Madison Square 
Garden and La Scala. 

The Georgian State Dance 
Company was created by Iliko and his 
wife, Nina Ramishvill, the company's 



chief choreographer and matriarch. 
Iliko was a leading soloist and choreog- . 
rapher with the Tbilisi Theatre, and a 
man, remembered his wife Nina, who 
was "full of Ideas, the most Important of 
: which was the desire to set up a 
Georgian folk dance company." ■. ■ , * ■ 
Georgia is known as the California of 
the Soviet Union because of its rich, fertile 
land, sunny valleys and majestic forests. 

'' Tickets are $23, $28, $33, and are on 
sale at the Marcus Center Box Office, 
(414) 273-7206 or (800) 472-4458. 
Tickets can also be purchased at all 
TicketMaster locations. 



- 



SINGLES 



SPECIAL 




Singles dance set 

The public is invited to a singles 
dance on Saturday, March 28, 8 p.m. to 
12:30 a.m„ at Bam of Barrington, 1415 
S. Barrington Rd., Barrington (1/2 mi. N, 
of Dundee Rd.). A free buffet and DJ 
music will be provided. For more infor- 
mation, call (630) 372-1109. 

St. Peter's dances 

All singles over 45 are invited to two 
dances this weekend, held by St; Peter's 
Single Club for single Catholics. On 
Friday, March 13, at 8:45 p.m., there will 
be a dance at Tivoli Gardens, 3258 N. 
Harlem, Chicago; and on Saturday, 
March ,14; a St. Pat's Dance will be held 
at the same location. There will be a live 
band for entertainment. Cost is $6. Coat 
and tie required. For more information, 
call (312) 337-7814. 



St Pat's Day Festival on tap 

In keeping with its tradition of being "the place 
to go" immediately following Chicago's St Patrick's ' 
Day parade, the Irish American Heritage Center will 
hold its 12th annual SL Patrick's Day Festival on 
Saturday, March 14 from 1 p.m. to midnight at 4626 
North Knox Ave., Chicago. 

The exciting line-up of i&ditional Irish music 
features the area's top performers, such as the 
Dooley Brothers, David Dunne, etc. Students from 
Chicago's leading Irish step dancing schools, such as 
the Trinity Dancers, will perform and there will be i 
c£ili dance demonstrations. 

There will be special treats just for kids, includ- 
ing face painting, magicians and games. Hearty 
appetites will be satisifetJ with delicious corned beef 
and cabbage, fresh-baked soda bread, sandwiches, 
Irish coffee and a variety of traditional Irish fare. 

Tickets must be purchased in advance, $12 for 
adults, kids 12 and under are free when accompa- 
nied by an adult. Only 3,500 tickets will be sold 
There will be no ticket sales at the door on the day of 
the event Purchase tickets by phone at (773) 282- 
7035. Visa and MasterCard accepted. / 

Ballroom dancing at Gorton 

Richard Burnett will lead Open Dances at 
- Gorton Community Center, 400 E. Illinois Rd., Lake 
Forest, one Friday night of each month. The next 
dance is set for March 13, from 8-11:30 p.m. Cost is 
$10 per person, and a half-hour lesson will introduce 
each class. 



The dances are designed to accommodate not 
only couples, but the many singles in the area — of ail 
ages. The music has been selected to please the most 
advanced dancers and encourage beginners to 
improve their skills and take part in the fiin of ball- 
room dance. The music has been recorded by the 
world's most famous dance bands, including The 
London Pops Orchestra, Nat Kirig Cole, and The 
Tropical Sounds Orchestra. All types of music and 
dances are featured: Quickstep, Fox Trot, Viennese 
Waltz, Rumba, Tango, Cha Cha, Samba, and Swing. 

Richard Burnett, owner of Burnett's Ballroom 
and Performing Arts Center in Villa Pjark, is an 
accomplished dancer who trained at the Fred Astaire 
Studio in the late 1970s and 1980s. 

Interested participants should register and pay in 
advance. For more information, call the Gorton office 
at 234-6060 between 9 am and 4*30 p.m., weekdays. 

Lake County art, craft show 

The public is invited to come out to the Lake 
County Arts & Crafts Show March 14 and 15, 10 a.rm 
to 4 p.m., at the Lake County Fairgrounds; the first of 
the season. There will be hundreds of artists and 
crafters from across the Midwest displaying hun- 
dreds of unique and one-of-a-kind self-created 
items. Choose from the many different styles of fash- 
ion apparel, home decor, furnishings and florals. 

Lake County Fairgrounds is located at U.S. 45 & 
Route 120 in Grayslake. Admission is 52. For more 
information, call Lake County Promotions at 223- 
1433/356-7499. 



i^f/ Presents ^ii 



By Susan Sandler - Directed by Tom Hausman 

In this del [ghtfulro mantle comedy, eighty year old 

Buddie arranges a blind date for her granddaughter with the pickle man! 

March 20 thru April 5 

FrJ. & Sot 8 p.m.; Sunday. Matinee 2:30 p.m. 
Adults $10*; Students & Seniors 58* 

Call for Reservations 

395-3055 

PM&L Theatre • 877 Main St., Antloch 

Box Office Opens March 9 

___ Box Office Hours: Moo. Uiru Thurs, 530-7:30 p.m.; Sat, 1 1 -2 
I .J i 1/2 hrs. before showtime. Reserved Sealing. VISA/MC 





Rafting The Mighty Colorado River 

byJIMWARNKEN 
President, North Star Travel 

Looking down from the rim of the Grand Canyon to the Colorado River 
below can be a breathtaking experience. What may appear to be a small rock 
below can actually be as big as a story high building! 

Still, it cannot compare to the awesome sight of looking up at the 
towering canyon walls from below, sitting by a background. In the moonlight 
you can just make out a Bighorn Sheep high above on a rocky ledge looking 
back at you. 

Then it's time for a peaceful sleep under the stars, thinking about the 
excitement of the next morning, when wc start our run down the mighty 
Colorado River! 

After the guides serve up a breakfast of Eggs Benedict, pork chops and 
blueberry pancakes, it's time to climb aboard the rafts and meet Granite, 
Hermit and Crystal. No, that's not the name of your guides. It's the name of 
some of the 60 or so rapids you'll run before the end of your trip. You'll also 
meet Lava Falls. Rapids are rated in difficulty from I to 10. With it's 37 foot 
drop, Lava Falls easily rates a 10! 

While any sport has it's dangers, running the Colorado's powerful rapids 
is much more exciting than it is dangerous. Professional outfitters have been 
guiding trips down the Colorado River for over 35 years. Safety takes 
precedence over every decision. Children under"I2 are usually not allowed. 
There is no upper age limit. Seniors are quite common on these trips. 

A complete run of the canyon is a 12 day trip. Shorter runs arc available 
adding the cost of a helicopter lift out. (It's either than or an eight hour hike). 
No need to bring camping gear, as most tours will provide everything you 
need, including meals you just won't believe that are prepared at a campsite! 

Trips are offered between April and October and book up very quickly. 
Since the number of runs arc limited by the U.S. National Parks 
Service, . .planning a year in advance is not uncommon. 



J5**' 




NORTH 



CRUISES 



STAR 




You have it at Manpower. 
The freedom to work 
when you want and 
where you want 

J . With that freedom 
comes great pay and 
benefits like life/health 
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For the freedom you 
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www.northstartravel.com 

(847) 356-2000 



©MANPOWER 

Lake Villa 265-6300 • McHenry 385-6600 • 
Vernon Hills 918-1200 • Wauconda 526-4300 • 
Waukegan 473-7100 • Healthcare 856-1307 • 

Training & Development 856-0915 • 

Technical/Sclentific/Professional 856-1514 • 

473-1203 TTY * 918-9615 TTY • www.manpower.com/lake 



s 



B6 /Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



March 13, 1998 



'Mars & Venus 
on a Date' 

Dr. John Gray, author of the 
bestseller "Men Are From Mars, 
Women Are From Venus," has creat- 
ed a new singles workshop facilitat- 
ed by fellow singles "Jimmy Z" Za- 
wiski and Lynn Meyer. 

If you are single, unattached or 
in a relationship and really want to 
make it work, this workshop is for 
you! Through this insightful, enjoy- 
able yet practical one-day workshop 
you will learn to successfully navi- 
gate through the five stages of dat- 
ing: attraction, uncertainty, exclu- 
sivity, intimacy and engagement to 
create a loving, lasting relationship. 
It works! All ages are welcome. The 
program runs March 28, from 9 a.m. 
to 6 p.m., at 445 E. Ohio, 4th Floor, 
Ghicago. To register, call l-(888) 
Go2-Grow. 

Single again? 

On Thursday, March 26, Sharon 
Nisisus, Psy.D., will present "Being 
Single Again" at the Holy Family 
Catholic Community Church, 2515 
Palatine Road (east of Barrington 
Road and west of Ela Road, at 
Thornbark Drive), Inverness. Dona- 
tion is $2. Sharon will discuss ad- 
justing to being single again and the 
discovery of a new identity. 



BE THERE 

Community group for 
disabled meets 

For those who are disabled 
and are looking for a group of 
people to discuss new ideas, old 
experiences, future advocacy pos- 
sibilities, or just emotional sup- 
port, the Community and Self 
Awareness for People with Dis- 
abilities group is there. The group 
meets every second and fourth 
Thursday of the month from 5 to 
6:30 p.m. at the Lake County Cen- 
ter for Independent Living, 706 E. 
Hawley St., Mundclein. For more 
information, call Sheila at 949- • 
4440, 

Drop-in bridge 
continues at Gorton 

Bridge instructor Ginny Schuett 
will continue leading drop-in bridge 
sessions, "Bridge Plus," at Gorton 
Community Center, 400 E. Illinois 
Rd., Lake Forest. The sessions arc 
held on one Wednesday of each 
month. Players can practice bridge, 
have fun and earn masterpoints. 
Come alone, with a partner, or a 
foursome. 

A 15-minute lesson will be given 
before actual play begins at 1 p.m. 
No advance registration is required; 
fee is S4 per person. For the next 
drop-in bridge date, or for more in- 



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UlDEO ®AKE QTwO 

82 CENTER STREET 
DOWNTOWN GRAYSLAKE 

(847) 223-8273 




iAM(k( 



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Where 
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forrriation, call the Gorlon office at 
234-6060 before 9 a.m. and -1:30 
p.m., weekdays. 

Networking club 

Network Lake County meets 
every Thursday at 0:30 a.m. at In- 
Laws Restaurant in Gurnee. Guests 
are invited and breakfast will be 
provided. 

Network Lake County is a non- 
profit networking organization that 
provides the growth of members' 
business' by providing education 
and sources of referrals, creating 
sales and business growth opportu- 
nities through shared contacts, per- 
sonal development, and proven 
business networking skills and dis- 
ciplines. 

For more information, call 244- 
2272. 

Group for widows/ 
widowers meets 

Widowed Outreach of Lake 
County, an organization of widows 
and widowers of all ages, sponsored 
by Condcll Medical Center, meets 
on the fourth Sunday of every 
month at Condell Medical Center 
Conference Center, 700 Garfield 
Ave, Libcrtyville. Meetings begin at 
2 p.m. after refreshments. 

Newly widowed men and 
women are welcome. The group 
also shares social events each 
month, boat trips, plays and 
potlucks. Dinner at a local restau- 
rant after the meeting is optional. 
For more information, call 362- 
2900, cxt. 6275. 



General Cinema 

LAKEHURST 



IROUTE 43 near ROUTE 120 
473-4200 



BARGAIN MAT1NU5 WIRY DAY 
ALL SHOWS SIFORI 6 PM 



SH0WT1MES FOR 3/13 THRU 3/19 



I BARGAIN MATINEES All SHOWS BEFORE 6PM 
•INDICATES WP TICKET RESTRICTIONS APPLY 



U.S. MARSHALS* r*ui 

Fri.-Sn 1 03. 230l 4.03, 5 JO. 6 50, 8 30, 9 40 
1 Mon.-Thur. 4 00. 6 50. B.30. 9.40 



CAUGHT UP (Ri 

Fn.iSal2.00, 4:3. 6.45. 9.03, 11:15 

Son 200. 4:30. 6 45, 900. Movlfct 43. 645, 9 00 



I THE WEDDING SINGER ire-iai 

FrvSji 12.45, 3.10, 520. 730, 9.40, l.ton-lhx 520. 733, 9 40 



CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD* **, 

I Fa 4 Sal. 12:15,230.4:45,753,9.15,1130 

I Sua 12.15, 230. 4:45. 7.00. 9.15: l.tai-Tru. 4:45. 7.01 9.15 



BORROWERS pci 

L Fri.-Sun. 2.15, 6:45; Mtti-Thur 645 



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Fri.-Sun. 12.00, 4:03, BOO ;Mon.-Thur. 400. BQQ 



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Fn-Sun 2:15. 4:45. 7:10. 930. Mm -Thur 4 45 710 , 9.TQ 

KRIPPEND0RFS TRIBE PC* 

Fry-Sun. 12-30, Mon-Thur. 530 

HUSH* (« i3) 

FaiSat. 1230,2:40,4:50,7.00,9.15 1150 
Sua 12:30. 2:40. 4.50,700, 9. 15 
l..Mqn.-Tm. 4:50. 7.00. 9:1 S 



BIG LEBOWSKI* m 

Fa-Sua 1:45. 4:30. 700. 9.30; Ito -Tntr. 4: 30. 7 00 930 

TWILIGHT* m '~ 

Fri-Sua 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 915 
i l.<on--Triur. 5:15,7-15 9^ 



I Saturday Only ROCKY HORROR nan PM 



M OVIE REVIEW 

Newman's class 
twinkles in 




You are in your 70s, yet you still 
sparkle as you command the Silver 
Screen that has seen your countless 
dramatic victories. Those startling 
blue eyes, sharpened not dimmed 
with age, still have the arresting 
magnetism that crowns you reign- 
ing king of the medium that made 

you famous. 

You arc Paul Newman. lust 
watching your sculptured features 
as you move through your latest 
film, "Twilight" is enough for most 
of your fans, and they arc a legion. 

That low smooth voice is filled 
with tremors, yet somehow you are 
not the miscast grandfatherly figure 
making love like other wrinkle-worn 
actors like Clint Eastwood or John 
Wayne in their aged romantic hur- 
rahs. 

We were hoping for another 
"Verdict" to validate Newman's su- 
perior dramatic efforts so his Oscars 
would balance out those won by his 
wife, Joanne Woodward. 

It's too bad that all of this Holly- 
wood glory is wasted in a mediocre 
mystery film that gets its strength 
from the aristocratic Newman and 
three other Hollywood celebs, who 
also can do little wrong because of 
their tremendous talent. 

Gene I lackman, Susan Saran- 
don (who also still seethes sex and 
allure despite her middle age), and 
James Gamer, all have presence and 




immeasurable talent that tran- 
scends "Twilight." You get the feel- 
ing that this outstanding cast is just 
"jarnmin"' dramatically for an 
evening's enjoyment, 

All of this is worth the ticket 
price even if this glorified "Harper" 
look alike isn't. Private investigator 
Newman interrupts the strong 
bond between longtime actors and 
lovers Sarandon and Hackman, as 
Garner lurks in the perimeter, while 
murder and somcoverly^compli- 
cated bloody mayhem cavort 

On the strength of the storyline, , 
we'd say wait for the video, but the 
sheer magnificence of Newman, 
Sarandon, Hackman and Garner are 
all big screen material. 

We give R-rated "Twilight" three 
out of five stars simply because its 
dynamite cast wades through this 
messy mystery with aristocratic 
class. 

A smarter director than Robert 
Benton could have created a classic 
mystery comedy by simply making 
proper use of these talents, while 
making fun of the film's ability to 
broadcast what's going to happen 
next. 

We yearn to see the combina- 
tion of Newman and Robert Red- 
ford or Newman and Garner in a 
"Butch Cassldy and Sundance meet 
Maverick" just one more time.— By 
Gloria Davis 




Susan Sarandon and Paul Newman in "Twilight," a film that earns 
three out of five stars for its talented cast. 



MNDELEIN CINEMA 

%7 155 N. SEYMOUR, MUNOELFJN !•!•) 

(847) 566-2490 



WALT DISNEY'S 

MMAG00 



FRI: 6:00, 8:00 
SAT: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 

SUN: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00 
MON; WED & THUR: 6:30 



ALL SHOWS$.1 .50 



General 

Admmion ' 




Lakeland NcwsfwijKJrs Is 

interested to lieurncivs oflocnl 

Kvctits t Clubs, and Organizations. 

Please send news hems to: 
Rhonda Ilctriek Burke, 

Grnysluke; 001)80 

Tel. 223-8161 

Fax 223-8810 

Photos are also welcome. 



! ANTlbcH*(847) 395-0216 • 
5 37B Lake St. Antioch . • 



CLA88KMONEMX 



FOX LAKE THEATRE 



Before $ 
Spm 



(847)973-2800 



i D PM 



SHOWTIMESF^f Tf^AV, MAR j'JTrirT HMP.n.v ."™ 

UAMIUTUglnftiiii.>., I ■imMi-i. 13 



MAN IN THE IRON MASK' (pcu) 

FRI 8:50, 9:40 
SAT 12:45, 3:55, 6:50, 9;40 
SUN/WED 1:45, 5:10, 7:55 
MON/TUE/THRU 5:10. 7:55 



I ITANIC (PC13) IKWHBTDIGrttl 

FRI 5:05, 9:00 SAT 1:00, 5:05, 9;0Q 

SUN/WED 1:00. 6:45 MON/TUE/THUR 6:45 

U.S. MARSHALS>oi3) 

FRI 7:05, 9:55 

SAT 1:15, 4:10, 7:05, 9:55 

SUN/WED 2:05, 5:05, 7:50 

MON/TUE/THUR 5:05, 7:50 



WEDDING SINGER <«.„, 
IhTjISS: If 0, 5:2S - 7: <°. 1 °:00 

SUNAfVED 12:40, 2:60, 5:25 740 
MON/TUEfTHUR gg %■« 



GOOD WILL HUNTING (.) 

FRI 7:00. 0:45 

SAT 1:30, 4:15, 7:00,9-45 

SUN/WED 1:30. BMO.eVoQ 

MOWTUE/THUn K-in jap 



O00 SO<KMSt0VEfl»|,C«tWEN 

/ (UNOEBJIIiAaSHCWrSBtfOMWM 

■" H JOO ADULTS AFTIHSrtl 



THE MAN IN THE IRON MASK <~"> 

ffultovThiLBaHOtSH.lSuvHO.t^tJ.WO 



LIBERTY (847)362-3011 



■ -HmIII',7 i'Kfj-fiVi ■»--•. -t-.^ 



SPICE WORLD m 

Sat. 4 Sun. 2*0, 4:15 

KISSING A FOOL ,., , 

Fri. & Sat fl^O, B30; Suru-Thur. 7:15 

APOSTLE trc-Hj 

Fri. 8:15, D:45; Sot. 1*0, 3:45, 6:15, 8:45 
Sun, 1:00, 3:45, 7KKJ; Won.-Thur. 7.-Q0_ 



Predict the Oscars! 

Win a One Year Movie Pass! 

Ballots at the theatre! 



•NO PASSES OH COUPONS * DOLBY SURROUND SOUND ON Al? 




1 Mchenry 1 & 2 (Sis) 385-0144* 

■" 1204.N: Green St. * 1 



S1 50 SENIORS & CHILDREN 11 4 UNDER 



1 



rW l RTfiffl l ff 1 * rn;n6p * i 



E KISSING A FOOL <n> 

Fri. 0:45, 0:46: Sat. 2:30. 4:30. 6:45. 0:45 
Sun. 2:30, 430. 7:15; Mon.-'Thur. 7:15 

DARK CITY cn> 

Fri. 6:30, 0:30; Sat 2:16, <:15, 0:30, 0:30 
Son. a:15, 4:15, 7:QO; Mon.-Thur. 7:00 



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#- 




B7 / Lakeland Newspapers 




March 13, 1998 



Get it off your chest (847) 223-8073 

Upservlce Is a phone-in column presented as a feature of Lakeland Newspa- 
pers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no claim to the authenticity of the state- 
ments. Lakeland Newspapers does not claim the content or the subject mat- 
ter as fact, but as the personal opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers 
reserves the right to edit copy or to refrain from printing a message. Call In at 
223-8073 and ieave your message 24-hours a day. Callers must leave their 
name, phone number and village name. Names and phone numbers will not 
be printed; however, callers may be called for verification. ', 



Trees, please 

We moved to the Island Lake/Wauv 
conda area six years ago because it 
was a small town with trees, but we 
didn't realize it was getting rid of 
the greenspaces. We can see the 
blacktop and concrete rolling down 
176, but to what end? Just more 
cheap, crummy storefronts and 
blacktop. When will these people 
realize the gem they hold? They call 
it progress. As if that label expunged 
all other points of concern. I'd 
rather see a tree than a parking lot. 
I'd rather pay higher taxes than en- 
courage crass commercialism. Why 
can't they at least have standards 
like Bannockburn or Lincolnshire 
and put some green in front of 
everything? Just because people 
hold blue collar jobs, doesn't mean 
they don't have class. 

Can we stop? 

For 20 years I have lived in 
Williams Park subdivision, and 
have been forced to join and pay 
dues to WPIA, the homeowners as- 
sociation. They have always com- 
plained about not having enough 
money, and always raised their 
dues, because they have to pay for 
flood retention in (loodprone ar- 



eas. Now that the County wants to 
buy them out, I think if the people 
don't want to sell their house the 
Williams Park association should 
not have to pay anymore money to 
stop the flooding of their houses, 
and they should be responsible for 
their own flooding problems. 

We love you 

We are proud to have known Bob 
Churchilll for 26 years. You deserve 
to be our Secretary of State, Bob. 
You were with us through our 
tragedies and happy times. We will 
never forget you and feel like you 
are a part of our family 

Fox Lake 

More sewer problems 

I would like to respond to the caller 
from Antioch about the sewers be- 
ing forced on the unwilling majori- 
ty. We are battling the same^prob- 
lem here in the unincorporated In- 
gleside/Cainswood area. The ma- 
jority doesn't want sewers. The 
c'osts'involved are very hard, not to 
mention the taxes that will go up 
hundreds of dollars every year in 
this area. We were told when the 
residents voted down the sewers 
twice, that it was only an advisory 



vote. What a cop out. Service trucks 
have been in the areas already mea- 
suring for the sewers. Do we have 
no rights regarding our properties? 
Can we be forced to pay for what we 
do not want7 Who's say outvotes 
the majority? 

Ingleside 

Fox Lake mail ; 

Fox Lake Vista and Nipersink Ter- 
race subdivisions are in the Fox 
Lake fire department district and 
the Fox Lake School districts. So 
why doesn't the Fox Lake post of- 
fice deliver mail in these areas 
rather than Spring Grove? If anyone 
has an answer, I'll look for it in 
Lipservice. 

Fox Lake 

Iraq 

I just want to say something about 
all this crud going on in Iraq, and 
the bombing or not bombing. Peo- 
ple seem to have forgotten that if 
George Bush would have stayed out 
of it, and let Schwartzkopf and the 
rest of them run that war, we . 
wouldn't be dealing with this jerk 
now. They were within 50 miles of 
Bagdad with nothing in between. 
They could have gone in there and 
flattened them and none of this 
would be going on. But nobody re- 
members that. 

Shut up 

I am calling about the caller from 
Round Lake who called about "Pig 
Farm." If people like that caller 
keep telling life-long residents 
where to go, then they should get 
but. Because the area is changing 
with all the new developments; and 



~ = 



1 998 

Home/rvr 



G arden^ 



Food 
Prize Giveaways 





MARCH 14 and 15 

10 am until 4 pm 

Holiday Inn in Mundeleiri (Routes 83 and 45) 



$2.00 Admission at the Door 

Complimentary tickets available from exhibitors 

Call (847) 680-0750 for more information 

Showcasing Great Ideas for Inside 
and Outside Your Home! 

• Home Repair and Remodeling 

• Deck and Room Additions 

• Heating and Air Conditioning 

• Kitchen Cabinets 

• Financing 

• Paint and Wallpaper 

• Floor Coverings 

• Landscaping 
....and Much, Much Morel 

Sponsored by- 

Ot Lakeland fjWpF {JHtg'g 




they don't like it, they should be the 
ones to leave. They should be the 
ones to get out of here and stop 
telling residents what to do with our 
.land. This is supposed to be a free 
country and whoever wrote that 
should just be quiet. 



Pre-existing 

From what 1 understand 
there is now a law stating that 
insurance companies cannot 
turn down applicants due to 
pre-existing conditions. If 
this is true, how come I just 
got denied insurance after 
several years of paying for it 
previously? Sure, we had a lot 
of doctor visits for colds and - 
ear infections. Does this 
mean that they are going to 
make it tougher than ever to 
obtain insurance, since they 
can't turn us down anymore 
for pre-existing conditions? 
And to get Cobra insurance, I 
was told it was going to be ex- 
actly half of what my take 
home pay is. That is for my 
family of two, and 1 don't 
qualify to receive public as- 
sistance. I'd rather not re- 
ceive it, but if it came down 
to it, I couldn't anyway. How 
is it fair? 

Libertyville 



Learn to read! 

It's a shame that many residents or 
Wauconda are too illiterate to read 
the sign posted on the gate to the 
high school track, stating, "No 
strollers, bicycles, roller blades, etc. 
allowed." Ifthey only knew the $20- 
$30,000 repair to the rubberized as- 
phalt Is coming out of their tax dol- 
lars, maybe they would adhere to 
the rules. 

Wauconda 

No telephone 

The mayor of Fox Lake has discon- 
nected the telephone service from 
the seniors of the Wednesday Club 
at the community center of Fox 
Lake. 

Fox Lake 

Did you realize? 

1 would like to know if anyone out 
there is paying attention. The super- 
visor of Lake Villa Township is at- 
tempting to secure grants for the 
purchase of land for recreation areas 
like ball fields and'such. Sure, that 
sounds okay, but do you realize that 
the township would have to provide 
matching funds (dollar for dollar) in 
the amount of any grant money re- 
ceived? 

This grant can be up to 
$400,000. Negotiations are al- 
ready under way for the land pur- 
chase. You probably think that the 
btfard can't spend that much of 
your money without a referen- 
dum, but that is not true. By accu- 
mulating funds year to year, like 
the supervisor has repeatedly 
done, the board will be able to 
budget out and expand these 
funds as they see fit. 

You the voters, can come to 
any regular board meeting, bud- 
get hearing or workshop meeting. 
You have the right to know the 
boards intentions on spending 
your money. By the way, this is 
the same board that decided to 
stop paying to light the existing 
football field to save us money. 
These two things together don't 
seem logical to me. 

Grow up! 

I would like to know why candidates 
who place their signs on approved 
sights are having their signs stolen? 
Isn't this a bit chilllish of the opposi- 
tion? People will still vote for whom 
they choose whether signs are there 
or not. 



Don't be fooled! 

I am calling to leave a message for 
the tax payers in the Big Hollow 
school district- in Ingleside. Al- 
though my children went to that 
school and now my grandchildren 
go to that school, the difference Is 
night and day/When my children 
went to that school, you could go 
into tHat office, ask a question, and 
you were treated politely-like you 
were somebody. Now when you 
go into that office and ask a ques- 
tion, the people are so rude and 
obnoxious. You try to ask a ques- 
tion abouta referendum and they 
act like you are prying' into their 
personal business. I am just asking 
the tax payers to not be fooled by 
everything those people are telling 
you, because they are not honest. 

Ingleside 

Sign stealing 

Just as she did in the previous election, 
Judy Martini is alleging that people 
are stealing her signs. Is it possible that 
they are being removed by the prop- 
erty owners who never gave her per- 
mission to put them there? 

Kiss of death 

Isn't it funny that none of the three 
people running for county board in 
Antioch Township have said any- 
thing about sewers? Could it be be- 
cause it is the kiss of death? Though 
it would be nice to have sewers, it 
would also be nice be to have a 
Cadillac. Since I can only afford a 
Chevy, I will stick to my septic sys- 
tem, which is working fine, and 
costs me about $130 every ten years 
to operate. 

Antioch Township 

Complaint line 

I was nappy to read Police Chief 
Watkfns admit in the front page sto- 
ry of the Antioch Reporter, that the 
police department needs more 
training and professionals. Instead, 
it seems most of the police officers 
of Antioch are stepping on the 
rights of citizens. If this continues, 
the station will need a larger wait- 
ing area to handle the public com- 
plaints against these officers. 
Maybe complaints are the only way 
to instill better police officer behav- 
ior. 

Antioch 

Can't fool me 

I've read Linda Peterson's profile 
and she looks like a busy person. 
Why does it appear that there is a 
campaign to remove someone 
from the county board who has 
done an excellent job for us all and 
has shown a real concern for the 
community. I keep seeing things 
that show me that there is a faction 
trying to stack the deck with their 
own cronies trying to get their own 
friends and families to run for of- 
fice. They are trying to put a third 
person on the ballot to take votes 
away from someone and stealing 
signs. Well it hasn't fooled me. I 
am going to be voting for Judy Mar- 
tini. 

Rte. 22 opposition 

I would like to know why there isn't 
a sign-up sheet for the people who 
are against the Rte. 22 bypass in 
Lake Zurich. Maybe we don't want 
another road going through the 
town! It may be a bypass, but the 
other one won't be taken out. 

Lake Zurich 

Boo Hoo 

Several people in Williams Park do 
not want to leave even though 
their house floods year after year. 
Boo-Hoo. Why do 1 have to pay to 
have their houses pumped out? 
And why is the County issuing per- 
mits to have more houses built in 
that area? Your guess is as good as 
mine. 



B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 



March 13, 1998 




Celebrate 

St. Pat's w/us 

Corned Beef & 

Cabbage 
dinner special 



FAJtOL 




Eating and meeting in the Lakeland area 



A Filet Mignon 



Featuring 

WORLD FAMOUS 
1/2 POUND BURGERS 



Homemade 
Dc.vscrt.s 



WEDNESDAY 

ALL YOU CAN EAT 

PASTA 

Only #5 95 



. Full Line Of »Beer «Wincs 'Cocktails *Llqueurs 'Cordials 
899 Main St • Antioch • 847-395-3373 





al Jimmy's Charhouso 
Rlverwoods Only 



Brochette 

Q (Prepared wicti onions, orecn pepper & 
mushrooms, served wltti wild rfce) 




5^ M ^'« *Charbroiied 




gCHARHOUSE 



seJ) 



'Both Specials Served with Choice 
jf|| of Potato and Soup or Salad 



Swordfish 
AIForno 

'(Topped wttti f orrtincila cheese, fresh 
hertK ft butter, served with wild rice) 

$ 




Prices valid 3/13/98 thru 3/20/98 



1111 N. Milwaukee Ave., 
Riverwoods 



(847) 465-9300 




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RESERVE YOUR 

• Private Parties • Luncheons 

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Have Us Cater Any Occasion 
-Call for more information 

602 N. MilwaukeeAve. 
LibertyvUle, IL 60048 

(847) 247-2208 

Gift CertiftcakJZailable ftes.-Thurs. 11-9; Fri.-Sat. 11-10 




$/W CUNEO 
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presents 
Sunday Brunch with Museum Tour 

altered by Eddie Bauer's Party Masters Catering 

f tZ*-"**^ Informal Hitting Inside Pool Museum 

l*MiMf lite} and Ham Carving Stations • Omelette Station 




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Extravagant Dessert Tables 

and Freshly Baked Breads & Pastries 

Brunch includes Free Champagne & Mimosas 




Sunday Brunch, New Expanded Menu 

1st Seating. 11:00 a.m. • 2nd Seating 12:45 p.m. 

Reservation Suggested, Walk-Iris Welcome 

I'lon NOW for Special Mother's Day & Easter Brunches 



1350 N.Milwaukee Ave.. Vernon Hills. IL 847-362-3042 



FRIDAY 5 prh: 
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Seafood & Rib Buffet 

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Buffets include 30 item salad bar 

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All You Can Eat £ jam 0-7 

Hot Luncheon Buffet -^Qr 7 

Includes Non-AIcohollc Beverage .\ 



Oliver's • 305 S. Route 83 • Grayslake 



Celebrate St Patrick's Day with Mickey Finn's Wheat Ale. 

Now in bottles. Now in stores. 
And now, in your refrigerator. 





AMERICAN CUISINE 1 FOdD & DRINK 



JOHN'S GARAGE, Hawthorn 
Shopping Center, Vernon Hills, for 
over 15 years, John's Garage has 
been providing full service dining to 
Lake County. Start your engine at 
our award-winning salad bar, and get 
revved up with nachos, buffalo „■- 
wings, or another of our appetizers. 
Fill your tank with a wide variety of 
entrees, from a Philly Cheese Stealc 
sandwich to a New York Strip Sirloin 
dinner.- Or select from our 
Unleaded, lighter styie entrees. We 
know you'll drive away satisfied! 



MICRO-BREWERY 



BREWMASTERS PUB & RESTAU- 
RANT, 4017 80th Street, Kenosha, 
WJ, (414) 694-9050. A casual, 
friendly atmosphere where even the 
beer is homemade. Lunch and din- 
ner served daily. Open daily at 1 1 
a.m., with average lunch prices 
$4.25 and dinners, $9. Open daily 
at 11 a.m. for lunch. $- $$$ 



ESSIE OAKS, For comfortable & 
:asual family dining at its best^ amid 
he wooded scenery of Lake County, 
l's Jessie Oaks Food & Drink, locat- 
:d at 81490 W. Old Gages Lake 
toad, Cages Lake, 223-2575 
or parties up to 50 there is an 
itlractive dining room. Jessie Oaks is 
Dpen Monday-Thursday from 10a.m. 
o 2pm, Friday & Saturday 9am to 
»a,m., and Sunday 9a.m. to 1 1p.m. 



SEAFOOD 



CAPTAIN GUIDO'S, 476 Liberty 
kireet, {Liberty Plaza), Wauconda, 
526-0606. Casual fine dining, great 
atmosphere. Specializing in seafood 
and pasta combinations, prime rib, 
ileaks, veal and chicken. Private 
pnrty room available. Open 1 1 a.m. 
io 9 p.m. Monday through Friday; 
4:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Saturday; 12 ' 
noon to 9 p.m. Sunday. $ - $$$ 




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Downtown Grayslake 

(847) 223-6900 



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890 East Route 45 
Mundeleln, IL 60060 





884-3900 

1149 Gotf RrX, West 
Hoffman Estates 




WHERE FRESHNESS IS A SPECIALTY 

ft "Unique 'Expenenvsk^^^ad <Dining 

Also an excellent selection of fine meat entrees 



Featuring: 

Live Entertainment - Tues. thru Sat. 
Music by Manila Sound 

Dally Specials 

Private Party Facilities 



Early Bird Menu 

Everyday 

Gift Certificates Available 

Open Dally: 

Monday thru Friday, 11 am 

Saturday, 4 pm; Sunday, 2 pm 



Jesse<gfaks 



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18490 W. Old Gages Lake Rd., 

Food & Drink G w 5 Lake 

Breakfast Now Send • Saturday Si Sunday - Full Menu 

St|pjrick's 0y, • March1l7th 
; Corned Beef & Cabbage 
Music (pglaiong) by; 
■f Randy 

Volleyball & Horse Shoe 
League Sign-tips 



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Tlie Best Chinese Food 

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And Our Customers 

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Chinese Restaurant p, enty of Free Parking 

•Dine In • Carry Out 'Cocktails 
The Chinese Restaurant That Uveryuody's Talking About 

(847) 548-8882 far (847) 548-2822 



SPOTLIGHTS 



ADVERTISEMENT 



The Silo 



Location: 

625, Rockland Rd. 

(Rte. 176) Lake Bluff 

Telephone: 
(847)234-6660 

Hours: 

11 a.m. to 10 p.m., 
Monday through , 
Thursday,; 11 a.m. to 
midnight, Friday and 
Saturday and 4 to 1 . 
p.m. on Sundays 

Menu: 

Large variety of assort- 
ed pizza, baby back 
ribs, chicken breast, 
pasta, soups, salads, 
appetizers, sandwich- 
es, variety of baked 
potatoes, heart healthy 
servings 




Best Pizza's at The Silo 

The Silo in Lake Bluff is the place to go for a 
sumptuous pizza feast. The Silo is famus for having 
the "best pizza around'' atested to by- the acco- 
lades which have Trie Silo receiving votes for hav- 
ing the best pan pizza on the North Shore from the 
Chicago Tribune. Chicago Magazine dubbed the . 
Silo's pizza "a superior version of Chicago style 
pan pizza." 

The great variety of assorted pizza delights 
awaiting customers of The Silo include supreme, 
vegetarian, seafood, taco, spinach souffle, and 
Frisco, as well as grilled garlic chicken and a 



cheeseless fresh vegetable grill. If diehards are 
not satisfied with these complete pizzas, they can 
load on extra sausage, mushrooms, pepperoni, 
ground beef, bacon, Canadian bacon, ham, 
pineapple, anchovies, black olives, onions, green 
peppers, jalapeno peppers, fresh garlic, sliced 
tomatoes, broccoli, zucchini, yellow squash, and 
of course, extra cheese. 

With all pizza connoisseurs guaranteed royal 
treatment, it would be a mistake to assume that 
The Silo is merely a pizza place. The restaurant 
has a full menu that includes baby back ribs, four 
chicken breast dishes, seven pasta dishes, seven 
varieties of baked potatoes, 22 sandwich choices, 
1 6 appetizers) six choices of soups, and salads, and 
some heart-healthy servings. 

Every Sunday evening from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., 
the whole family can be entertained by Tom 
"BOZ^The Magician. BOZ has appeared on 
Bozo's Circus; NBC TV, Fox TV, and at Chicago's 
Pump Room. 

The family owned restaurant has developed a 
warm atmosphere for dining and the staff is highly 
service oriented and more importantly, very friend- 
ly;* Their loft affords ample banquet space for large 
groups. 

The Silo, located at 625 Rockland Road (Rte. 
176), in Lake Bluff, is open 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
Mon. through Thurs., 11 a.m. to 12 midnight Fri. 
and Sat, and 4 to 10 p.m. Sundays. Their phone 
is (847)234-6660. 



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39401 N. Route 83 • Lake Villa, IL 60046 

(Next to B-G Mart) ^___ 




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Our Chef's 

Specialty: 
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50% off any food order w^SSiSio 






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1913 E. GRAND AVE., LINDENHURST OPEN 11 AM DAILY 



B10 I Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



March 13, 1998 



-f 



Plan a splashy summer border 



With the end of winter 
soon approaching and 
the spring season right 
around the corner, it is 
time to think seriously about what 
we will plant for summer blooms. 
After the winter being so mild, 
there are many of us just itching to 
get outside and begin digging. One 
thing is certain, we cannot rush the 
season. Do not begin turning over 
the dirt too soon, if it is too wet, 
your work will be for naught, and 
you will create large clumps, rather 
than aerate the soil. 

Perhaps this season will find 
?! you in a new environment, and you 
are not sure if there are any peren- 
nials that will emerge come sum- 
mer, but you know you want a 
flower bed. A sun-loving summer 




GARDEN 
JOURNAL 

LydiaHuff 



border offers you an astounding 
array of brilliant flower colors that 
can easily be created with annuals. 

The summer garden offers 
some of the brightest colors, in a 
range of bright yellows, reds, 
oranges, and blues. Choose the 
annuals you will grow with the site 
in mind, also go with a color 
scheme which is pleasing to you, 
and your tastes. You can incorpo- 
rate colors that pick up some hue of 



the permanent structures around 
your property whatever suits you. 

Good choices for a border are 
in the background, Black-eyed 
Susans, Daylily, Zinnias and tall 
African Marigolds. For the middle 
of the border, Petunias, Salvia, and 
French Marigolds are great choices. 
In the foreground. Begonias and 
Sweet Alyssum work real well. All of 
the aforementioned flowers are 
readily available anywhere you 
would purchase gardening sup- 
plies. 

When the weather and condi- 
tions permit, you can begin by 
clearing a border about three feet 
wide and as long as your space per- 
mits. Remove weeds and other 
growth and add about a two-inch 
layer of compost. Start with the 



IN THE KITCHEN 



How do you shell 'Humpty Dumpty'? 



This week, a reader asks a ques- 
tion that, most likely, many of us 
cooks have also wondered: 

Dear 'In the Kitchen' editor: 
I consider myself a pretty 
good cook and am quite handy 



In the kitchen. But darned If I 
can't get the shells off of hard- 
boiled eggs neatly, when mak- 
ing Deviled Eggs. Am I cooking 
the eggs too long or too short, 
cracking them too hard, or 
what? Please help, I love to 



BAND APPEARANCES 



Friday, March 13 

Mike & Joe, rock, will be 
performing at Duny Nellie's, 55 
N. Bothwell, Palatine. For more 
information, call 358-9150. 

Sugar Blue, blues, will be 
performing at Beale Street Blues 
Cafe, 1550 N. Rand Rd., Palatine. 
Cover charge is S7. For more 
information, call 776-9850. 

Mike & the Marauders, 
rock/blues, performs at Duke 
O'Briens, HON. Main St., Crystal 
Lake. Cover charge is S3. For 
more information, call 
(815)350-9980. 



Saturday, March 14 

Dermot Murphy, Irish music, 
performs at Durty Nellie's, 55 N. 
Bothwell, Palatine, from 3-6 p.m. For 
more information, call 358-9150. 

Ilmmy Thackery, blues, will 
be performing at Beale Street Blues 
Care, 1550 N. Rand Rd., Palatine. 
Cover charge is $7. For more infor- 
mation, call 776-9850. 

Coming Soon: Local band 
Black Alley Blues will appear at 
Grand Bowl in Waukegan on March 
21, and at Main Street in Round 
Lake on March 28. For more infor- 
mation, call 973-0128. 




i 



. 



: 



IEMTICE 



f-ft IT" 







make Deviled Eggs, but hate It 
when the egg looks like the sur- 
face of the moon when I'm 
done shelling IC 

Antiocli 
If there's anyone out there who 
can answer this question, write in 
and we'll publish the replies. 

Questions, hints or recipes for 
"In the Kitchen" can be sent in care 
of Lakeland Newspapers, 30 S. 
Whitney Si, Grayslake, IL 60030. 



background plantings first. Space 
die plants irregularly. You do not 
have to follow any set pattern, but 
use equal numbers of each variety. 
Plant French Marigolds and 
Petunias in positions to fill out your 
design— these plants are best when 
planted in clusters. I like to use 
Sweet Alyssum and Lobelia in the 
front edge of a flower border— they 
tend to trail back into the border, 
and are good to fill in empty spots 
throughout the design. 

In late April, the nurseries will 
be loading their shelves with annu- 
als, go and check them out. All the 
different colors and varieties that 
are available these days will 
astound you. If you are not sure of 
what types of flowers you like or 
what color scheme will work for 
you, "window shopping" is an 
excellent ideas. Believe me, you will 
want to buy them all. I find it help- 
ful to estimate how many flowers I 
need for a particular area, know 
the types I want to use, and put the 
plan down on paper. This way, you 
will not overbuy; remember those 
tiny seedlings do grow and spread. 
Ask someone working at the nurs- 
ery about the flowers' growth 



habits, if you do not know them. 
They usually have a marker telling 
you how high they will get, how 
much space to leave between 
plants, and if they are sun or shade , 
lovers. 

Once your border is planted, 
remember to water regularly, espe- ^ 
daily when rain is scarce, to help ; 
plants establish a good root system. 
Also, to keep flowers looking their 
best, "deadhead" them often. That j 
means to remove the spent blooms, 
by pinching them off. 

Happy planning, before long 
we will be planting. Until then, 
peace. Oops, I almost forgot. If you ' 
want some really awesome ideas } 
for your garden, go check out the { 
Chicago Flower and Garden Show. >' 
It is at Navy Pier, Grand Ave. at 
Lake Michigan, and will be going J 
on from this Saturday until March j 
22. The hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. ' 
Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 
8 p.m., on Saturdays, and 10 a.m. to 
6 p.m. on Sundays. 

Garden questions may be sent to " 
Garden Journal, c/o Lakeland 
Newspapers, 30 S. Wliitney St., 
Grayslake, IL 60030 




LIFE'S A 
BEAR 



^ Donna Abear 



Donna Abear is on vacation. 
Watch for her column in next week's 
Laketife Section. 



GRAYSLAKE 

c/lrtsG&Crafts 

LAKE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS 

Grayslake, Illinois 

Illinois 120 & U.S. 45 

SATURDAY & SUNDAY 

10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

ADMISSION $2.00 

March 14 & 15, 1998 

Lake County Promotions 'P.O. Box 461 • Grayslnko, IL 60030 

(847)223-1433 



■^■ , vv *v ^w -w *w ^wm 'mw -w ▼ *w*r ir Tin 



VINTAGE POCKET WATCH SALE 

7 to 23 Jewel Watches - Circa 1890 - 1948 
All In Excellent Dunning Condition 

$ 95 00 t „ $ 375 

. 14K Gold Slightly Higher 




% 



^<V First Bank Plaza 

NoithWest Jewelers Rte. 12 & 22 • Lake Zurich 

Servins Lake Zurich For IS Years Hours* Open 10-5:30 

Located next to D&J Bistro Tues.-Sat. 

847-43 8-012 5 c,0 ^ s X ay & 



: ■ 



gp 



March 13, 1998 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 

'4HMM>HNHIIRniiMHMMMHIMMH 



Lakeland Newspapers /B1 1 



Don't miss out on this deal 

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Get a ^ There's never been a better time to get a new '99 Cat™ from Dick's Marine. 

limited-edition 

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accessories. Plus, you can choose from our many limited-edition sleds: 

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Open Bally Until 7:00 



Illinois Teen Institute looking 
for July seminar participants 



Where do students go to focus on 
drug prevention,, stopping violence, 
and building leadership skills? The 
answer is the Illinois.Tecnage Insti- 
tute. This year's ITI will take place at 
Knox College in Galesburg. First ses- 
sion is July 12-16; second session is 
July 26-30. ITI is encouraging both 
teens (as participants) and adults (as 
staff) to attend. The cost for youth 
and adult participants registering be- 
fore June 1 is $265. From June 2 - July 
10 this cost is $300. 

Teens at ITI have an intense five 
days of seminars and small groups. 
They discuss leadership, violence,' 
and the harmful effects of drugs and 
alcohol. ITI also leaves students with 
an increased sense of self-esteem 
and responsibility. 

When participants return home, 
they become more active in their 
community. Teen return with ideas 
to increase drug awareness in their 
schools and help provide alternatives 
for other students. Participants are 
also provided with an opportunity to 
work with over 700 youth and 120 



adults from across Illinois. 

Students build the skills neces- 
sary to become leaders in thier com- 
munity. ITI Has been providing teens 
with awareness education and lead^ 
ership training for 23 years; 

ITI also encourages thecommu- 
nity to participate : by providing 
scholarships for the students. Over 
80% of the teens who attend ITI are 
able to do so because of assistance 
from local businesses, parent organi- 
zations, and other community 
groups. 

Without the enthusiasm and in- 
volvement of these community orga- 
nizations, along with Chicago Public 
Schools and the Illinois Sheriffs As- 
sociation, rn would not be able to 
provide quality programming. If you 
are interested in making a donation, 
providing a scholarship, or partici- 
pating, please contact the Illinois Al- 
coholism and Drug Dependence As- 
sociation (IADDA) at (217) 528-7335. 
ITI is a program of the IADDA, and is 
. funded In part by the Illinois Depart- 
ment of Human Services (DHS). 



DanceS capes '98 set for March 15 



Talent Forum of Libertyville is 
proud to present DanceScapes '98 at 
Mundelein High School on Sunday, 
March 15, at 4 p.m. Tickets are cur- 
rently on sale at Talent Forum, 450 
Peterson Road in Libertyville. Tickets 
are $5 for seniors and children and $6 
for adults. The performers are from 
all over Lake County and offer a high 
caliber of entertainment. 

The music and dance selections 
will please the entire family. This 
showcase features Bach and Pachel- 



bel enhanced by ballet. Chum- 
bawumba to Fiona Apple are 
brought to life with various jazz 
styles. Tappers will rock to Jerry Lee 
Lewis and Chuck Berry. The Foot- 
prints Tap Ensemble, returning from 
standing room only crowds at Walt 
Disneyworld, will premier new 
works, including "Men in Black" 
There will be a solo by Amy Schwartz, 
Talent Forum's 1997 scholarship re- 
cipient, and much more. 

Tickets are available at the door. 



11-,-.'. 





) NEWS1220 









) THE TALK OF LAKE COUNTY 



• Fri. March 13th 

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State Bank of the Lakes 

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Counterfitters-Grayslake 

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They're the Real thing! 

Waukegan Savings and Loan 
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At Rodriguez of A.G. Edwards & Sons 
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Thanks to all our sponsors! 

















B12 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



March 13, 1998 




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March 13, 1998 



BANK & FINANCE 




Lakeland Newspapers/ B 1 3 



Inside credit reports: reading 




the lines 



Your credit report contains im- 
portant information about you— 
information that can help you land 
a job or get approved for a mort- 
gage. Last year, in an effort to con- 
tinually improve credit reporting 
accuracy, Congress enacted the 
Consumer Credit Reporting Reform 
Act, which took effect in October of 
this year. 

While the Act is designed to im- 
prove the way credit information is 
handled, it's important that you're 
aware of your responsibilities with re- 
gard to your credit report. 

The role of credit 
reporting agencies: 

What many people don't realize is 
that a credit bureau is simply an infor- 
mation gathering business. The three 
major credit reporting agencies input 
the computerized information they re- 
ceive from lenders and merchants de- 
scribing consumers outstanding bal- 
ances and payment history. 

' These agencies also search pub- 
lic information records at courthous- 
es throughout the country for infor- 
mation concerning judgments, liens, 
foreclosures, and bankruptcies. Cred- 
it reporting agencies do not assign 
ratings, nor do they deny credit. It is 
the lender who decides whether a 
consumer is creditworthy, based on 
the information it receives and on its 
own credit criteria. 

When and why you should 
review your credit report: 

Review your credit file every few 
years to make certain the information 



it contains is accurate and complete. 
Most errors occur In files of family 
members with the same last name 
and address and in those of people 
with common names. Misspellings 
and incorrect Social Security num- 
bers add problems as well. Make it a 
point to check your credit report in 
. advance of applying for a mortgage or 
other major loan. That way you can 
correct any errors and avoid delays in 
the processing of your loan request 
To obtain a copy of your credit re- 
port, you can contact one of the three 
major credit reporting agencies: 
Trans Union at 1-216-779-7200; Ex- 
perian (formerly TRW) at 1-800-682- 
7654; and Equifax at 1-800-685-1111. 
The new Act limits to $8 the amount 
credit reporting agencies may charge 
you for a copy of your report By law, 
if you contact the credit reporting 
agency within 60 days of being denied 
credit, your credit report is free. Based 
on the new Act, you are also entitled 
to a free report if you are unemployed 
and looking for work, are on welfare, 
or have reason to believe that your 
credit report contains inaccurate in- 
formation due to fraud. 

Correcting errors: 

If you discover that your credit re- 
port contains inaccurate or incom- 
plete information, complete the re- 
quest for reinvestigation form you re- 
ceive witli your report or write to the 
credit reporting agency stating specif- 
ically why you believe the informa- 
tion is incorrect. The agency must 
contact the source of the disputed in- 
formation . Under the new Act, which 



places more of the burden on the 
creditor, the creditor must certify that 
the questioned information is correct. 

If the information is found to be 
incorrect or incomplete, the credit 
reporting agency must delete the in- 
formation or modify it based on the 
results of the investigation. At that 
time, you can request that the credit 
reporting agency provide a revised 
copy to any creditor who reviewed 
your file during the previous six 
months (two years if the inquiry was 
employment related). - 

If. the credit reporting agency 
cannot verify the disputed informa- 
tion within 30 days, the information 
must be deleted from your credit 
record. Should the creditor subse- 
quently verify the accuracy of the 
deleted information, the agency is 
now required to notify you in writing 
within five days of reinserting the in- 
formation in your file. 

If the dispute cannot be resolved, 
you have the right to file a brief state- 
ment explaining your side of the sto- 
ry. This statement becomes part of 
your file and is sent to any creditor re- 
questingyour credit information. The 
credit agency may limit such state- 
ments to not more than 100 words, if 
it provides you with assistance in 
writing a clear summary. 

Another important provision of 
the Consumer Credit Reporting Re- 
form Act gives consumers the right to 
sue for damages if the creditor or the 
credit reporting agency verifies incor- 
rect information. What if there is neg- 
ative information in your file? Don't 
despair. CPAs advise thatpayingyour 



bills responsibly over a period of two - 
to three years may help convince 
lenders that your credit problems are 
behind you\ 

ThelllinoisCPASodetyisthestate 
professional association representing 



over 26,000 certified public accoun- 
tants throughout Illinois. For infor- 
mation on additional CPA Society 
program^ events, products and ser- 
vices, individuals canvisitiheSociety's 
Web site at httpJlwww.icpas.org. 



IRS and your taxes: common myths 



Accidents happen in threes, it al- 
ways rains on Halloween and if you 
file early you are sure to be audited. 
Most of us know that the first two 
myths have big odds, buta lot of tax- 
payers really believe the last one. I 
am devoting this column to putting 
to rest some of the major myths that 
still abound. ** 

When you file your return has no 
relationship to your being audited. 
Every item on your return is scored 
based upon their relationship to one 
and other. The IRS uses these scores 
as the primary way to select returns 
for examination. Your return re- 
ceives the same score regardless of 
when or where it is filed. 

Another myth involves calling 
the IRS tax help line which receives 
thousands calls a day. Many people 
believe that if they call the toll-free 
number, we'll pay closer attention to 
their return than someone else. The 
IRS employees working on the he tax 
help line do not ask callers for their 
names unless needed. 

Another myth says that if you use 
the peel off label which is on the re- 
turn you' receive, that this will in- 
crease your chances of being audit- 



ed. Let me dispel that one right now 
and encourage all taxpayers to use 
the label because it will reduce the 
chance for error. 

Some people believe that IRS 
employees work on commission. 
Nothing could be farther from the 
truth. IRS employees are paid a 
salary just like other federal workers. 

Another untrue rumor is that if 
you receive a large refund this will in- 
crease your chances of an audit The 
IRS only wants to collect the amount 
of tax that is due. 

Another myth says that you must 
be a minimum age before you are re- 
quired to file a tax return. There are 
still others who think that you can 
stop filing when you reach a certain 
age. Both are untrue. The IRS sets 
specific income thresholds which 
determines whether a tax return 
should be filed. 

A final myth out there contends 
that just because you receive a re- 
fund your return has been accepted 
as filed. The IRS has three years from 
the due date of the return (or the 
date is was filed, whichever is later) 
to audit a return. — Robert W. Brock, 
IRS District Director 




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VICTORY MEMORIAL 
w HOSPITAL 

Asthma awareness 

Asthma Awareness is a unique 
oneton-one program which brings a 
person with Asthma together with a 
professional asthma counselor. To- 
gether, they work to manage the dis- 
ease on a daily basis, identifying per- 
sonal triggers for attacks, developing 
healthy activities and learning about 
medications. Asthma Awareness is 
offered through the Cardiopul- 
monary Rehabilitation Department 
at Victory Memorial Hospital, 1324 
N. Sheridan Rd., Waukegan. For 
more information, call 360-4131. 

Respite program 
provides needed break 

People who provide daily care 
for older or chronically ill relatives, 
'-'• occasionally need a break to care 
for themselves. The Respite Pro- 
gram at Victory Lakes Continuing 
Care Center, 1055 East Grand Ave., 
Lindenhurst, offers short-term care 
for stays from 24 hours to 30 days. 
This allows the care giver to take 
care of personal business, enjoy a 
vacation, attend a wedding with 
peace of mind that their loved one 
is being well taken care of in a 
friendly, comfortable, secure set- 
ting. Call Judy Gentry at 356-5900 
for more information. 

Quit smoking 

Smokers who are serious about 
quilting can now have the help of a 
trained professional. Victory's One- 
on-One Quit Smoking Counseling 
Sessions are scheduled to meet their 
individual needs. A combination of 
successful techniques to change be- 
,.,-. haviors and quit smoking are used. 
The sessions arc offered by Victory's 
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation 
Department, 1324 North Sheridan 
Rd., Waukegan. For more informa- 
tion, call 360-4131. 

Assistance with 
Medicare claims 

Senior Passport provides assis- 
tance with Medicare claims and 
medical bill processing. The pro- 
gram is for people aged 85 years 
and older who have supplemental 
health insurance in addition to 
Medicare coverage. There is a $20 
membership fee. Senior Passport 
is offered by Victory Memorial 
Hospital, 1324 North Sheridan ltd., 
Waukegan. For more information, 
call 360-4222. 

Assisted living 
offers independence 

People who can no longer live 
tv independently because they need 
help with activities of daily living 
may choose the Assisted Living 
program at Victory Lakes Continu- 
ing Care Center, 1055 F. Grand 
Ave., Lindenhurst. Assisted living 
residents enjoy the friendly, active 
atmosphere at Victory Lakes; deli- 
cious meals and snacks; activities 
and companionship; and assis- 
tance in those areas in which they 
need help. Call Judy Gentry at 356- 
5900 for more information on as- 
sisted living. 

CONDELL MEDICAL 
CENTER 

- • Pre/Post-Natal 
Exercise Program 

Centre Club Pre/Post-Natal Ex- 
ercise Program meets at 10:30 a.m. 
Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays 
at Centre Club. Participants may 
bring babies up to six months. For 
registration information, call the 
front desk at Centre Club, affiliated 
with Condell Medical Center, at 816- 
6100. 

Pulmonary rehabilitation 

Pulmonary Rehabilitation Pro- 
gram is offered at 9 a.m. every Mon- 
day and every Thursday in the Res- 
piratory Care Departmental Condell 
Medical Center, 801 S. Milwaukee 
Ave. on Condell Drive, Libertyville. 
The program is designed for individ- 
uals with chronic lung-related disor- 
ders. Contact Gary Shellenberger, 
R.R.T., Assistant Director and Pro- 
gram Coordinator, at 362-2905, ext. 
5175. 




B14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



March 13, 1998 



Children's Advocacy Center receives $55,000 donation 



The Lake County Children's Ad- 
vocacy Center recently received a gift 
that will benefit the people of Lake 
County. A check in the amount of 
$55,000, which represents 50 percent 
of the proceeds from the Victory 
Hospital Foundation's 1997 Festival 
of Trees, was donated to the center in 
support of its work in the fight 
against child abuse. Also benefiting 
from the four-day, pre-holiday char- 
itable event (held last November) 
was the Cardiac Catheterization and 
Special Procedures Suite at Victory 
Memorial Hospital. 

"We plan to use this wonderful 
donation to expand counseling ser- 
vices to the children and families in 
Lake County who are victims of child 
abuse," said Michael J. Waller, Lake 
County's State's Attorney. In addi- 
tion, some of the funds will support 
MECCA, the medical examination 
clinic for children's advocacy. 

The Lake County Children's Ad- 
vocacy Center, located at 323 North 
West Street, Waukegan, is a program 
of the Lake County State's Attorney's 
office. The center's staff investigates 
alleged incidents of child sexual and 
physical abuse and provides support 
and counseling services for its young 
victims and their families. Child 
abuse cases in Lake County have in- 
creased dramatically since 1979, 
Currently, the center serves 350 fam- 
ilies each year. 

Children may be afraid to talk 
about an incident of sexual or phys- 
ical abuse. There arc some signs that 
parents and concerned others can 
watch for, however, which may indi- 
cate a problem that should be inves- 



tigated. Children may exhibit behav- 
ioral changes like loss of appetite, 
change in bowel or bladder habits, 
trouble sleeping, nightmares, acting 



out, excessive clinging, etc. Or, they 
may have physical complaints, usu- 
ally in the abdominal or genital ar- 
eas. 



People who suspect child sexual 
or physical abuse are urged to call 
the Lake County Children's Advoca- 
cy Center at 360-6870. 




Lake County State's Attorney Michael J. Waller (center) accepts a $55,000 donation for the Lake 
County Children's Advocacy Center from the Victory Hospital Foundation. The donation was made 
possible by the success of the foundation's 1997 Festival of Trees. Making the presentation were 
(left to right) Tim Harrington, Victory Memorial Hospital president; Jan Knobbe (Beach Park), festi- 
val co-chairman; Waller; Mary Schostok, State's Attorney's office; and Janet Furman (Libertyville), 
Enchanted Evening ball chairman. 



Local Weight Watchers members take 



Charlenc Jozcfiakof Antioch and Jane Adams 
of Lake Villa, were two of 10 Weight Watchers 
members nationally to be named a winner in the 
company's "Tea with The Duchess" Sweepstakes. 
Each winner traveled to New York City for tea with 
Sarah, Duchess of York, on Jan. 30, 

The Duchess hosted the tea for 36 guests in a 
private suite at New York's St. Regis Hotel. 

Earlier in the day The Duchess went go online 
for a live chat during the world's first cybertea 
hosted by Hearst New Media's highly popular 
"HomeArts Network" (www.homearts.com). 
Those with internet access pre-registcrcd for the 
online event. Coverage of Duchess' tea party at the 
St. Regis, including photos and video clips of the 
winners, was posted on the "HomeArts Network" 
on Jan. 31. 

Weight Watchers members were eligible this 
past fall to enter the sweepstakes each time they 
attended a Weight Watchers meeting, resulting in 
more than'600,000 entries. The company matched 



each entry with a donation towards a check that 
will present to the National Alliance of Breast Can- 
cer Organizations (NAIJCO). . 

The "Tea with The Duchess" Sweepstakes was 
part of the launch of Weight Watchers' new 1*2*3 
Success™ Plan. 





Jane Adams (left) and Charlene Jozefiak 
(above) had tea in New York with Sarah 
Ferguson, Duchess of York, as winners of 
Weight Watchers' "Tea with The Duchess" 
Sweepstakes. — Submitted photos 



Children's experts to address common urological problems 



Urinary tract infections, bed- 
wetting, constipation and other uro- 
logical conditions can be distressing 
for parents as well as children. Many 
parents may have questions such as 
how long does training take or will 
their child grow out of this problem? 
The "Ask Children's Experts" lecture 
series will answer many of these 
questions during its series on "Com- 
mon Childhood Urological Prob- 
lems" at Children's Services at Glen- 
brook Hospital, March 18 from 7 to 
8:30 p.m. 

"Parents need to keep in mind 
that the vast majority of children 
who have bed-wetting problems and 
recurring urinary tract infections are 
physically normal; they simply have 
a condition — comparable, say, to 
asthma, acne or bronchitis— that 
needs attention," says William Ka- 
plan, M.D., pediatric urologist at 
Children's. 

Kaplan says studies show that 
only five percent of children who 
have difficulty controlling their uri- 



nation have a structural problem 
that requires surgery. Fifty percent of 
the physically normal children wet 
only at night duringsleep; 40 percent 
during the night and day; and 10 per- 
cent wet only during the day. Boys 
experience wetting problems more 
so than girls. 

"No one knows for sure how 
children normally learn to control 
their bladders during sleep and, 
conversely, why some children 
have difficulties mastering this," 
said Kaplan. "As children grow old- 
er, they become aware of a sensa- 
tion of fullness during the day and 
gradually learn to 'hold back.' Very 
likely, welting problems are com- 
parable to a learning disability that 
may be influenced by a number of 
factors including delayed matura- 
tion of the central nervous system 
or certain foods." 

Kaplan will be a guest lecturer at 
the series which is free and open to 
the public. For registration and more 
information, call l-BOO-KIDSDOC. 



Children's Services at Glenbrook 
Hospital is located at 2150 Pfingstcn 
Road in Glenview. 



For more information, visit their 
website at www.childrensmemorl- 
al.org. 



St. Therese to host Women's Health Fair 



The Lake County Business and 
Professional Women and Provena 
Saint Therese Medical Center, will 
host their second annual women's 
health day, "Coming Into Bloom," 
dedicated to all women, on Saturday, 
March 14 from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

The event will take place at Saint 
Therese Medical Center in Waukegan. 
This day of wellness will provide clin- 
ical blood and cardiovascular testing 
as well as educational health forums 
conducted by Saint Therese physi- 
cians and health care professionals. 
Among the variety of topics presented 
will be Tai Chi, laser surgery for spider 
veins, and hormone replacement 
therapy. Exhibitors will be on hand to 
explain or demonstrate a wide variety 



of health related topics. A box lunch 
will be served. 

Keynote speakers will be a repre- 
sentative from the Illinois Depart- 
ment of Health, Women's Health Di- 
vision, and Carolyn Morris, 1995 
Mrs. Illinois, founder of the Domes- 
tic Violence Agency, and a candidate ■ 
for Sheriff of Cook County. 

Each participant will be given a 
20-page wellness questionnaire cov- 
ering topics from nutrition to mental 
health. A complete analysis will be 
mailed back to each participant with 
health recommendations. 

Admission is $5, $10 if staying 
for lunch. Testing fees are addition- 
al. Reservations are necessary. Call 
1-88B-069-1118. 



March 13, 1998 



HEALTHWATCH 




Lakeland Newspapers / B1 5 




our 




Dear Dr. Singer, 
I am a 3rd grade , 
teacher and find some 
of my Idd's choices of 
"heroes" most unsettling. 
Instead of looking up to great 
minds, great artists, great musi- 
cians or brave people In gener- 
al, the kids I see are more Inter- 
ested In the latest sports player 
who kicked someone or the 
newest T.V. program that has " 
excessive profanity (mostly the 
cartoons) or the person who has 
done practically nothing but 
because he Is making millions, 
thatlsenoughtoIookupto.lt 
disturbs me because I feel that 
our society Is really without 
heroes right now and in desper 




PARENT'S 
PLACE 

Sherri Singer, 
Psy.D. 



ate need of them. What do you 
think? F.H. 

DearF.H. 

I aJso get distressed about this. I 
also think our society is in need of 
more heroes with strong character 
and good values. I think there are 
.heroes out there. You just need to 
look hard enough. I think it's okay 
for kids to appreciate someone's 



humor or crazy antics, but to make 
these people into icons becomes a 
bit difficult, especially when the per- 
son's public behavior is anything 
but "hero-like." 

My suggestion would be to 
make some of history's greatest peo- 
ple more interesting than a text 
book might Help these kids to 
appreciate some of the "hero" quali- 
ties that you see in others, both past 
and present. Sometimes, the text 
books can make very colorful people 
seem very bland. You can bring the 
color back in. Now, will that let you 
compete with today's headline 
crowd? Probably not at the same 
level, but at least, you'll be adding 
some perspective arid some texture. 

Be careful about letting kids 



know that you disagree with their 
choice of heroes. It will make them 
dig their feet in deeper and become 
even more attached to that hero. Try 
and find out what qualities are 
attracting the kids. It may not be as 
bad as you think. Even in the most 
objectionable person, there can be a 
lot of hard work that goes into their 
specialty. 

Try to illustrate the behaviors 
you feel are good versus the ones that 
are bad. Try and help kids tt> under- 
stand what a hero is. I think that the 
movie, "Hercules" put it in the best 
way I've heard yet It said, "A hero is 
not judged by the strength of his size 
but by the strength of his heart" This 
is a terrific lead-in for a discussion. 

Also, you have to remember that 



in 3rd grade, kids rarely have long 
term principles involved in their 
choice of hero. They like the guy 
who is funny or shocking. They like 
the guy who says and does things 
they aren't allowed to. This isn't 
unusual Help kids to see a little 
past this perspective and you might 
be surprised at what comes out 

This column is for entertainment 
purposes only. Information in this 
column cannot and should not 
replace proper Psychological treat- 
ment Dr. Sherri Singer is a Licensed 
Clinical Psychologist and childhood 
behavior specialist For an appoint- 
ment, please call (70S) 962- 2549. 
You can also email questions to Dr. 
Singer at Kiddoc5925@aoLcont. 



IlCrUCS nglll HUW UI1U 111 UCSptir- lUrjUUb "J Upprecjaie bOmUOne S ucuiicimtiuuuuaui^wui /usu.juuiwvciuiuhuiiuu uitu *jin 6 Sri 1*1 ixtuuvi^^t-j^- 

Tips help allergy sufferers get out and enjoy the great outdoors 

As one winter fades into memo- The **fresh" air: ter and dry the air. day, most pollens are emitted by Gardening 



As one winter fades into memo- 
ry, fewer sights are more inviting 
than the blooming plants and nest- 
ing robins that signal the onset of 
spring. The warmer weather is a 
breath of fresh air for everyone, 
except the 40 million Americans 
who equate spring with the begin- 
ning of the dreaded "allergy sea- 
son." 

The American Lung Association 
is offering these valuable tips on ways 
allergy sufferers can enjoy the out- 
doors. 

"Finally, the word is being spread 
that allergy sufferers don't have to live 
in a glass bubble once the weather 
turns warm. This is the first time 1 
have ever seen a major public infor- 
mation campaign to help allergy suf- 
ferers enjoy the great outdoors," says 
Dr. Linda B. Ford, asthma and allergy 
specialist 



fhe "fresh" air: 

Microscopic granules of pollen 
can come from trees In the early 
spring, grasses in the early summer 
and weeds in the late summer. The 
sneezing, coughing, itchy, watery 
eyes and upper respiratory conges- 
tion is often called "hay fever." 

These are ways to manage the 
effects of spring pollen if you suffer 
from allergies: 

• Monitor air quality through 
radio, television and newspaper 
pollen-count reports. Most allergy 
sufferers develop symptoms when 
pollen counts are moderate to high, 
but symptoms can continue even 
when the count lowers. 

• Pollen levels are highest in the 
early morning before 10 a.m., so try 
not to be outdoors then; and when 
you are indoors, keep the windows 
closed and use air-conditioning to fil- 



ter and dry the air. 

• Have someone else mow the 
lawn or rake leaves, these activities 
stir up pollens and molds. 

• Don't hang sheets or clothing 
out to dry; pollens and molds collect 
on these materials. 

• Avoid touching eyes and nose 
and transferring pollen there. 

• Also, avoid drinking alcohol 
during the allergy season; alcohol 
stimulates mucus production and 
dilates the blood vessels, worsening 
runny nose and nasal congestion. 
Smoking, of course, irritates your 
eyes and respiratory system, making 
allergy symptoms worse. 

Outdoor Exercise 

Allergies should not force you to 
give up your outdoor exercise plan if 
.you follow these guidelines. 

• Avoid exercising early in the 




Life Skills Series 



3/18/98 
LAKE VILLA 



4/1/98 

WAUKEGAN 



All presentations are FREE of charge and are held at the 
location indicated from 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. 

Seating is limited, registration is required, call 1-888-869-1118. 



Psychological Approaches To The Management Off Physical 
Pain William Lee, Ed.D. 

A comprehensive approach to pain management for people who deal with 
pain on a daily basis due to an underlying medical condition. Dr. Lee, a 
clinical psychologist on the Provena Saint Therese staff will provide an 
overview of effective psychological strategies in coping with pain, which can 
compliment more traditional medical interventions. 



He Said, She Said...What Was Said? A Couple's Guide to 

Improving Communication Bernard Levinc, Ph.D. 

Communications problems often lie at the heart of conflicts among couples. 
However, effective communication is a skill which one can learn. Dr. Bernard 
Levine, a clinical psychologist on staff at Provena Saint Therese, will provide 
important suggestions about how to improve communication in 
relationships, promoting an increased ability to resolve conflict and an 
increased sense of togetherness. 



WAUKEGAN - Provena Saint Therese Medical Center, 2G15 Washington St., 
Waukegan, Illinois 60085. One block east of Green Bay Road on Washington Street 
LAKE VILLA - Provena Saint Therese Area Treatment Satellite, 37809 N. Route 59, 
Lake Villa, Illinois 60046. One block south of Route 132 on Route 59. 



?a! Provena 

Saint Therese Medical Center 



day, most pollens are emitted by 
plants between 5 am. and 10 am 

• Breathe through the nose, It Is a 
natural air filter. 

•Don't exercise in fields or mead- 
ows where irritating grasses and 
weeds grow. 

•Bathe and wash your hair when 
you come in, especially before going 
to bed at night Pollen clings to your 
hair and can rub off on your pillow 
and trigger allergies overnight Wash 
your exercise clothes. 

• Plan your activity around your 
allergy. After a rain is a good time for 
those allergic to pollen, but a bad 
time for those allergic to molds. 
Molds also tend to be worse in damp 
places, such as basements, by the 
pool and in the forest 

• If necessary, wear a particle 
mask, available at the hardware store; 
it will help filler the air. When mow- 
ing the lawn or gardening, glasses or 
sunglasses help protect eyes; washing 
eyes with artificial tears removes pol- 
lens. 

• Take an antihistamine thirty 
minutes before outdoor activities. 

• Stretch indoors to minimize 
time spent outside. 

Travel 

One way to avoid the source of 
your allergy is to literally leave it 
behind and travel to a region with 
better conditions. Since it usually 
takes about two years to develop 
allergies indigenous to any region, 
even short trips can be a step in the 
right direction. And, don't forget to 
pack an over-the-counter antihista- 
mine and decongestant, or the med- 
ication prescribed by your doctor. 

• If traveling by car, keep the win- 
dows closed. Select a mode of trans- 
portation that has air-conditioning. 

• A beach anywhere is one of the 
best places to visit, especially along 
the Caribbean and American coast- 
lines. 

•In the United States, try to plan 
your destination in hot and dry areas. 
Among the. best choices is rural 
Arizona. 

•Areas of high elevation (i.e., over 
5,000 feet} are good, as die altitude 
and relative cold reduce pollens and 
air-borne allergens. Mountain ranges 
and areas in Northern California are 
recommended vacation spots. 

• Avoid camping and hiking in 
die woods, where mold growth on 
rotted logs and other vegetation is 
high. If camping is in your plans, 
make sure to wash your sleeping bags 
in very hot water before leaving. 

• Try to clean beach houses and 
cabins early in the season, as mold 
and house dust mite levels increase 
during the off-season. 

• At a spa, avoid the steamroom, 
another "hot spot" for mold growth. 

• Hotel rooms should be cleaned 
daily to prevent mold and dust build- 
up, and always request smoke-free 
hotel rooms. 

• When shopping, avoid antiques 
shops, where dust and moid can liter- 
ally have hundreds of years to accu- 
mulate. 



If gardening gives you pleasure, 
there are ways to minimize discom- 
fort if you have a green thumb and a 
red nose from allergies. 

• Allergy-causing plants vary 
around the country, but there are 
some guidelines in identifying plants 
to select or avoid; e.g., showier plants 
pollinated by insects are better choic- 
es because these flowers' pollen 
grains are larger and less bothersome 
to most people. Less "attractive" 
plants rely on the wind for pollina- 
tion, and thus have smaller pollen 
grains that can cause allergies 
through inhalation. 

• In most areas of the country, the 
worst pollen-allergy causers are: 
Trees, including oak, olive, western 
red cedar, elms, birch, ash, hickory, 
pecan, poplar, sycamore, maple, 
cypress and walnut in the in the early 
spring, and then pollinating grasses 
such as timothy, Bermuda, orchard, 
sweet vernal and red top. Weeds, 
such as ragweed, sagebrush, pig- 
weed, tumbleweed, nettle, dock, 
Jambsquarters and cockleweed 
become a problem in the late spring 
and summer. 

• Some believe you should select 
"nonalle^gic' , plants for your garden 
which are less likely to cause allergy 
symptoms. Since pollens are carried 
by the wind, a neighbors plants can 
still affect you on a windy day. 
Remember that the allergic effect is 
increased with the concentration of 
the plants; go for variety in your 
plantings. 

• Try these "sneezeless" plants 
recommended by the American Lung 
Association of California Check with 
your local Agricultural Extension 
Service Office to confirm which thrive 
in your area: 

Trees: pine, pear, dogwood, 
plum, red bud, ginkgo, magnolia 

Shrubs; Hibiscus, Yucca, 
Pyrantha, Viburnum, boxwood 

Lawns: Dichondra, Irish moss 
and bunch grasses 

Flowers: poppy, peony, azalea, 
pansy, 

Bulbs: tulip, iris, Ranunculus, 
daffodil. 

• Some gardeners with allergies 
use black plastic mulch instead of 
straw to keep down pollinating 
weeds, dust and mold growth. 
•Have someone else mow the lawn 
and hoe the weeds along the edges of 
the garden regularly. 

• Choose the time you garden 
carefully. Evenings are best, as plants 
have stopped pollinating. Right after 
a thunderstorm is a good time to gar- 
den for those witfi pollens allergies, 
but a bad time if you have mold aller- 
gies. Take an antihistamine thirty 
minutes before gardening. 

• Some people find they need a 
particle mask (available at the phar- 
macy) for gardening. 

• Watering the soil regularly and 
thoroughly with a sprinkler will keep 
dust and mold from rising. 

• Wear gardening gloves and 
don't wipe your eyes while working 
outside. 



■-'.-tfj^lli.'- 



Bl 6 /Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



March 13, 1998 




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Lakeland 
Newspapers 



Section 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 




sm 



Miss America winners may be 
starting out in Antioch, Satur- 
day, March 21, in the Miss Lake 
County Scholarship Program be 
ing held at Antioch Community High School 
at 7 p.m. 

Six candidates will seek the title of 
Miss Lake County and one will become el 
igible to participate in the Miss Illinois 
pageant which ultimately leads to the 
Miss America title. 

"This is our inaugural year," said Kristin 
Wheeler, organizer of the Lake County event 
for the Miss America organization. 

"I wanted to have a representative who 
knew the area and could represent it well," 
she said of the county's initial candidates. 

"It's about finding a woman of the 1990s 
who is talented, intelligent, and can be a role 
model for others," she said. 

Presenting themselves for consideration 
are: Jennifer Christian, 18, of Lindenhurst; Re 
becca Christophersen, 21, of Antioch; Eliza- 
beth L Craig, 22, of Libertyville; Melissa 
Fleming, 17, of Lindenhurst; Jennessa Dawn 
Lystlund, 21, of Zion; and, Maureen Mika, 17, 
ofWildwood. 

Christian attends Carmel High School. 
She does a comedy monologue for the tal- 
ent portion of the event. She intends to 
speak about "Self Worth: Appreciation and 



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Christian: 

Contestant from 
Lindenhurst 



Christophersen: 

Contestant from 
Antioch 



Craig: 

Contestant from 
Libertyville 



Lystlund: 

Contestant from 
Zion 




Mika: 

Contestant from 
Wildwood 



Self-esteem." 

Christophersen attends Loyola Universi-. 
ry. She will speak about the topic "Empower 
the Transition to Independence of Homeless 
Women and Children." She will also sing. 

Craig attends Northwestern University 
where she studies flute performance and the . 
French language. She will play her flute and 
speak to the issue "The Power o f Women: Tak- 
ing Responsibility for Herself." 

Fleming also attends Carmel High School. 
She will sing and speak to the issue of "Self 
Reliance and Positive Peer Influence." 

Lystlund attends Quincy University. She 
. performs a baton twirling routine. She will 
speak to the issue of "Sexual Assault Preven- 
tion and Intervention on College Campuses." 

Mika attends Warren Township High 
school. She will do a country-western vocal 



performance. She will speak about the "Stu- 
dent Ambassador Program." 

"Miss America is a scholarship program," 
Wheeler said. "Every year we give over $32 
million to young women. We're the largest 
provider of scholarships to young women in 
the world." 

The selected candidate on March 21 will 
obtain $300 of scholarship winnings. There 
are no entry fees or sponsorship fees which 
candidates have to pay to participate in this 
pageant activity. 

* Hostess for the pageant is Aimee Fuller. 
"She's director of the Ms. Heart of Illinois pro- 
gram," said Wheeler. Ms. Heart of Illinois is 
also a preliminary event for the Miss Illinois 
and Miss America pageant. 

"We have entertainment being provided 
by the Dance Connection of Lake County," 



Wheeler said. The Spot Light Dance Compa- 
ny will be the actual group to perform. 

"They are an award-winning dance com- 
pany," she said. 

Pageant participants will provide enter- 
tainment during the evening as part of their 
evening routine. In addition, Fuller will sing a 
song. . 

Tickets are $5 and are available from 
Wheeler and members of the Spot Light 
Dance Company. Tickets will be S7.50 at the 
door. 

"Miss America can expect to earn about 
580,000 in scholarship money," said Wheeler. 
"I used to compete when I was in college, and 
it helped me get through college." 

Further information is available from 
Wheeler at 847-223-7880 at ext. 8153 during 
the day or 847-83B-6017 evenings after 6 p.m. 



LMV Chamber sponsors 7th annual home show 



Get a head start on spring at the 

7th Annual Lake County Home. Jm^. 
provemeht Showrsch'eduied for Sat- 
urday and.Sunday, March 14 and 15 
at the Holiday Inn in Mundelein. 
Sponsored by the Libertyville, 
Mundelein, Vernon Hills chamber of 
Commerce, Lakeland Newspapers 
and WKRS/WXLC Radio. The show 
will have more than 66 booths show- 



THIS 
WEEK 



HEALTH AND 
FITNESS DIRECTORY 

Tips and ideas on how you 

can improve your health and 

quality of workout 

BOOKLET INSIDE 



EMPLOYMENT 
OUTLOOK 

Get help in finding 
that perfect job 

PAGE C15 



casing the latest in interior and exte-. 
rior design, remodeling, landscaping 
and lawn caTe,' financing, heating aiid 

nlr 'conditioning nnd ' much more. 
This great show is open to the public 
from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. both Satur- 
day and Sunday. 

Plans have been made to make 
this the biggest and best Home Show 
ever. Exhibit booths "range from in- 
side solutions to outside additions. 
Such well known companies as Supe- 



rior Exteriors, The Carpet Corner, 
j-MGN-Lock-Key;^ Sarcs.Sblar Brite, 

Backyard Enclosures; Accent Land 
' Design, Dfck's Carpet Service and 
Laursen & Blackman windows will be 
on hand to offer tips and ideas for 
home fix ups. Our banks, insurance 
and mortgage exhibitors can help 
you finance these special additions to ' 
your home. Check out ways to lower 
your energy costs with the latest in 
heating and air conditioning ideas 



from exhibitors. 

Free food samples will be provid- 
ed throughout the weekend by welJ- 
known eateries, including Quig's 
Country Restaurant, Lamb's Farm 
and Domino's Pizza; also Bauer's Par- 
tymasters Catering and Catered Pro- 
ductions will be there with samples. 
In addition to the wide variety of 
booths, displays and demonstrations, 
raffle and prize items will be given 
away by exhibitors. 



Last year several thousand inter- 
ested shoppers visited booths and 
came away with ideas for improving 
their homes — and the names of con- 
tractors and businesses to do the work. 
Admission is only $2 at the door. 
There also are "free" tickets available 
through many of the local banks and 
all show exhibitors and in Lakeland 
newspapers. 

For more information, phone the 
Chamber of Commerce at 680-0750.' 



Churchill, SaM vie for 
Secretary of State job 



By BRENDAN O'NEILL 
Sports Editor 




SPORTS 
NICKNAMES 
GONE WILD 

Jerry Pfarr looks at the 

manyuh strange nicknames 

in the world of sports 

PAGE C5 



. Election time is here again, and 
two local powerhouses vie for the po- 
sition of Secretary of State. 
Republican primary can- 
didates Bob Churchill and 
AlSalvi have both staked 
a claim to this office. Now 
the people must decide. 

Churchill, a state rep- 
resentative for the 62nd 
District, has held the posi- 
tion since 1983 and looks 
to remain a staple in the 
Springfield political scene. 

Churchill has three 
daughters with his wife, 
Sandra, and currently re- 
sides in Lake Villa. 

In addition to his tour 
of duty as State Represen- 
tative, Churchill held the 
position of Lake Villa 
Trustee, and was a Repub- 
lican National- Nominat- 
ing Convention Delegate 
in 1980, 1992 and 1996. 

Stressing efficiency 
and economy, and re- 
maining tough on drunk 




Churchill: 

Grayslake Atty., 
State Rep. 




Churchill has approximately 30 cats 
in his bam, and has recently come un- 
der fire for that fact, but he explains 
that the barn give the cats a warm 
place to live, rather than roaming 
around unwanted. 
Salvi, a practicing lawyer 
in Waukegan, began his 
political career as a down- 
state Republican candi- 
date for congress in 1986. 
He was first elected to 
the Illinois General As- 
sembly in 1992 and won 
an upset victory in the 
March 199G Republican 
primary, defeating Lt. 
Governor Bob Kustra. 

In addition, Salvi ran, 
unsuccessfully, for elec- 
tion as a U.S. Senator in 
1996. 

Salvi has traditionally 
been pro-family and anti- 
tax, with an emphasis on 
reforming our school sys- 
tem. He has sponsored 
anti-crime and anti-drug 
legislation, and has hisy- 
torically fought to elimi- 
nate wasteful govern- 
ment spending. 



Lake County Sheriff race 
comes down to wire 



By BRENDAN O'NEILL 
Sports Editor 



Salvi; 

M%MW*& Rep., Waukegan ^ Ma Jn M ^evoi 



iry similar I 
Gov. lim Edgar. 



Atty. 



ers the chance to decide. 



The Lake County Sheriff's 
heating up, and Republican 
date Willie Ray Smith is 
vying with incumbent 
Sheriff Gary Del Re for the 
position. 

Smith is a .lifelong 
resident of Lake County, 
has two adult Sons and 
resides in Antioch with 
his wife, Haidee Vazquez, 
and their young son. 

Active in local law en- 
forcement since 1969, 
Smith was most recently 
Captain Commanding of- 
ficer of Lake County Sher- 
iff Marine Unit Patrol, a 
position he held from 
1994-to October of 1997. 

Smith is active in a 
number of affiliations and 
organizations, including 
First Chafrman of the 
Board of Lake County Ma- 
jor Crimes Task Force, he 
is a member of the Frater- 
nal Order of Police Lodge 
66; and is a member of the 
Lake County Chiefs of Po- 
lice Association. 

"My first priority is to 



race is 
candi- 




Del Re: 

Incumbent 




Smith: 

Former Marine 
unit officer 



review the Sheriff's budget in order to 
maximize the»epent dollars in actual 
service provided to the public sec- 
tor," said Smith. "I want as many pa- 
trol officers as possible patrolling our 
communities." 

Del Re, currently recu- 
perating after quadruple 
bypass surgery, began his 
law enforcement career in 
1973 as a police officer 
with the Buffalo Grove Po- 
lice Department. 

He has instituted Coun- 
ty-wide programs such as 
the Gang Unit, Major 
Crime Task Force, Child 
Advocacy Center and Bike 
Patrol, among others. Del 
Re has affiliations and 
memberships with a 
number of organizations 
including the National 
Sheriff's Association. 

"As Sheriff, I will continue 
to seek out new and innov- 
ative ways to work in har- 
mony with others toward 
solving the wide range of 
difficult and ever-changing 
problems lhat.confront us 
all," said Del Re. 

County voters will de- 
cide on this spirited race 
in the March 17 primary. 












C2 I Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



March 13, 1998 



Republicans compete for Dist. 62 

Osmond and Petersen hope to fill seat vacated by Churchill 



ByLEONRLAS 
Staff Reporter 



Voters in Illinois State District 62 
will decide who will be representing 
them in the state house in the March 
17 primary. 

With the seat being vacated due to 
Bob Churchill running for Secretary of 
State, two men are stepping forward 
to try and fill the seat. 

Timothy Osmond and Paul Pe- 
tersen are the two men vying for the 
republican nomination to the house. 
With democrats in the district not 
producing a candidate, whoever 
wins the primary will win the seat va- 
cated by Churchill. 

Osmond has been the Antioch 
Township Supervisor for the last 
year, after being a township trustee 
for eight years. He is also a republi- 
can precinct committeeman. Pe- 
tersen, on the other hand, has never 
held a formal office, yet was defeated 
in his bid to become a Lake County 



Board member sue years ago. 

Petersen claims, due to his never 
holding a position, he is un-bought 
and un-bossed. 

"1 have no political baggage to 
haul around," Petersen claims. "I 




Osmond 



Petersen 



have no political bosses to answer to. 
I am un-bought and un-bossed." 

Osmond, who has officially 
picked up the endorsement of 
Churchill for his vacated seal, said he 
deserves the candidacy due to his 
past performance. 



"I believe that my past govern- 
mental positions, my community 
service and my professional business 
experience enable me to do a good 
job representing the 62nd District," 
said Osmond. 

In schooling, Osmond believes 
that the school reform bill passed last 
year is a step in the right direction, 
while Petersen is stating that it needs 
to be re-addressed, due to the bill de- 
pending on "sin taxes." 

Both, also, just want to become 
part of the process to make the laws. 

"I want to become part of the 
process," Osmond stated about run- 
ning for the vacated seat. "I think I 
would be challenged by the position. 
I would tike to help keep the 62nd 
District the best area of the state." 

"After 16 years of mediocre rep- 
resentation, it is time for a true man 
of the people to go to Springfield to 
represent the interests of the people 
instead of the fat cat lobbyists." said 
Petersen of his bid. 




March 28 9am-5pm 
March 29 I0am-4pm 

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• EXHIBITORS • DEMONSTRATIONS 
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Sun. 1-3 



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(Former Chicago Blackhawk) 

Sun. 11-1 

Sat. 1-4 • Sun. 1-4 









Sponsored by: 

Antioch Chamber of Commerce, 

Lakeland Publishers and 

NEWS 1220 

ifsr 



Lake County's 






Crane and McSweeney 
battle for eighth 
Congressional seat 

McSweeney and incumbent 
Crane have many similar views 



By LEON RLAS 
Staff Reporter 



Voters will decide this week 
which candidate will represent them 
in the US Congress for the 8th Con- 
gressional District of Illinois in the 
March 17 primary. 

The incumbent, Phil Crane, has 
been the main stay at the position, 
seeking his 16th 
re-election bid. 
Crane has been 
in office for 28 
years, being 
elected' to . the 
position in 1969. 
Opposed to 
Crane is David 
McSweeney, a 
trustee of Pala- 
tine Township 
and professional 
businessman. He is seeking his first 
term for the office. 

Both men have similar views yet 
with varying degrees of changes in 
legislation. 

Both men would like to see radi- 
cal changes in the Internal Revenue 
Service, both pushing for a fiat tax 
rate for all people. 

"I favor abolishing the IRS and 
the current tax code by October 1, 
2001, and replacing it at that time 
with a fairer "flat tax" with a $25,000 
exemption for a married couple and 
a $5,000 exemption for each depen- 
dent," said McSweeney. 

On the other side, Crane, 
through his spokesperson Kirt John- 
son, said, "Wc are absolutely in favor 
of changing the IRS. Congressman 
Crane was the first to push .for a flat 
tax and reform the current tax code." 
Both men also agree that the 
sanctions against the Iraqi govcrn- 




Crane McSweeney 



ment should not be lifted, yet Mc- 
Sweeney said that President Clinton 
is placing too much reliance on 
achieving unified UN action. 

Also, both men agree that the 
Department of Education in the fed- 
eral government should be abolished 
and disbanded. 

"The department of education 
should be disbanded." said Johnson. 
"The money 
should be kept In 
the states so local 
community and 
parents should 
make the deci- 
sion on how the 
money is spent." 
"The • Depart- 
ment of Educa- 
tion should be 
abolished, not 
only to cut unnec- 
essary federal spending, but also as 
part of a program I believe Is essen- 
tial to getting the federal government 
out of local education," said Mc- 
Sweeney. 

Yet, as the time comes, with so 
many similar issues, both men step 
forward and explain why they arc the 
better candidate. 

"Phil Crane has proven he has. ef- 
fective leadership and has lived up to 
his past campaign pledges to reduce 
spending and the federal tax burden 

for the people," Johnson stated. "He 
has been doing the Job Uiat Hit; peo- 
ple have elected him to do." 

"As a Palatine Trustee, there's no 
doubt in my mind that I have the 
background, governmental experi- 
ence, and strong commitment to 
conservative principals to do the job 
in the responsive, responsible way 
voters want it done," said Mc- 
Sweeney. 



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March 13, 1998 



COUNTY 



Lakeland NewspapersCOUNTY /G3 



AT A GLANCE 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 



i. 



Park City rocked by murder 

Park City— A peaceful evening in Park City was inter- 
rupted by gunfire which resulted from a domestic dispute. 

Diego Acosta, age 16, of Waukegan, is being charged as an 
adult in the March 4 murder of Eduardo Avila. 

"Most residents have been pretty understanding that this, 
is an isolated incident between two people who are not from 
Park City arguing about a girlfriend," Mayor Rob Allen said. 

Police recovered the weapon which Acosta is believed to 
have used. Acosta, had tossed the weapon in a nearby woods, 
as he tried to flee the murder scene in the 500 block of West 
Street. 

Acosta is being held without bond at Lake County's juve- 
nile detention center. Avilla, age 19, was prounced dead by 
Lake County Coroner's office approximately 10:30 p.m. 

Pool tournament Mar. 22 

- I Jndenhurst— Lindenhu rst Men's Club hosts their first 
"King of the Hill" pool tournament March 22 at 1 p.m. at the 
Thor Neumann Center, f 

The tournament is open to members and guests, males 
and females, according to Bob Pabst, tournament organizer. . 

"It is straight eight-ball, call shots," he said. 

People who wish to play can sign-up starting at noon. 

"It's a five dollar entry fee. All prize money will be divided 
up based on the number of entries," he said. 

"It is a double elimination with a winners and losers 
bracket," he said. 

"We have some door prizes," he said. "You don't have to 
be a winner of the tournament to win." 

Library's future in voters' hands 

LlbertyvUIe— It's been debated for the last three months, 
and now the future of the Cook Memorial Library District is in 
the hands of those it serves — the voters. 

On March 17, district voters will decide whether or not to 
approve a $19. 1 million bond issue. The money will be gar- 
nered from an increase of the library tax rate, from .25 percent 
to .40 percent. Library district officials have said they intend to 
use the funds to renovate the existing downtown Cook Library 
building, build a second, 88,000 square foot library in Vernon 
Hills and operate both facilities through the year 2020. 

The tax rate change will increase property taxes paid on a 
$200,000 home by $94.75 in the first year of the bond issue. 

Children's museum takes lease . 

Fox Lake— The Art Works Children's Museum now has a 
home. 

With the unanimous approval by the Board of Trustee's of 
the Village of Fox Fox Lake, the Art Works Children's Museum 
will be taking over the lease for the old Fox Lake Lions Club, 
across from South Marrin Street in Fox Lake. 

"This is a great addition to the town," Mayor Jim Pappas 
staled about the museum. "This goes a long way into inspiring 
the image that we want of our downtown district." 

, The lease between the village and the Art Works is a one 
year lease running from March 11, 1998 through March 11, 
1999. The rent of the building will be $1 140 per month. 

Fire in fireplace flue 

Wauconda— While several members of the Wauconda 
Fire Department were stationed in Tower Lakes on March 9 in 
response to the standoff situation of Chicago Bear Alonzo 
Spellman, the department received a fire call at approximately 
5:^0 p.m. 

A young visitor of a home in the Tamarack subdivision 
called 91 1 and reported she had just started a fire in a fire- 
place, which caused the home to fill with smoke, fire reports 
said. Fire crews responding to the call noticed heavy smoke 
conditions and a fire on the roof and attic, located above the 
ceiling level in the area surrounding the flue vent of the wood 
burning fireplace, authorities said. 

Fire crews made entry into the first and second floors of 
the home an extinguished a roof and attic fire, officials said. 
The residents had been evacuated prior to the fire crews ar- 
rival, and no injuries were sustained. Estimated damage to 
the residence and its contents is $75,000. The cause of the fire 
was determined to be accidental and attributed to the over- . 
heating of the fireplace flue vent, authorities said. 




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Regional Champs! 

Mundelein High School's Doug Rippbereger cuts 
down the net after the Mustangs' playoff win over 
Stevenson in the Waukegan Sectional.— Photo by 
Sandy Bressner 



Village joins IL MainStreet 

Mundelein— Mundelein Pride, a downtown revitaliza- 
tion organization was notified earlier this week that it had 
been accepted into the Illinois Suburban MainStreet program, 
making it only the second community, next to neighboring 
Libertyville, to have that distinction in Lake County. 

Pride and Mundelein officials were overjoyed with the 
news that Mundelein had been chosen to be a part of the pro- 
gram which will help solidify its downtown revitalization 
plans by providing training and support services. Those re- 
sources will become evident when MainStreet officials stop by 
Mundelein March 19 for a day-long visit, meeting Pride and 
Village officials, speaking about the programs it can offer and 
touring the downtown area. 

"I think it is exciting news for Mundelein," said Mundelein 
trustee Raymond Semple. "This is great news for Mundelein 
Pride." Said lohn Maguire, Pride's executive director, "This is 
a goal we have achieved after main years of planning, but real- 
ly, we are now ready to start the renovation program that we 
have been speaking about for so long." 



Three vying for Dist. 15 seat 

Ubertyville— Voters in county board district 15 will de- 
cide who will represent them on the county board in the 
March 17 primary. 

Incumbent Carol Calabresa, current Libertyville Township 
supervisor F.T. "Mike" Graham and former village of Liber- 
tyville trustee Bob Ostroga are all vying for the position. 

Library hosts "Celebrate the Arts" 

Lake Villa— Lake Villa District Library will "Celebrate the 
Arts" Saturday, March 21 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. with free/ 
hands-on activities, entertainment, and refreshments for all ■ 
ages, 

"Every year the library plans a special event for die com- 
munity," said Liz Rifkin, head of community services for the li- 
brary district. "Our theme for the day revolves around bring- 
ing arts to the community in a variety of media." 

"Last year, "Pioneer Days on the Prairie" drew a crowd of 
almost 1900 people," Rifkin said. "Celebrate the Arts" is open 
to the entire community. 

Events start at various times through the day. Eight events 
start off "Celebrate the Arts" at 10 a.m. Five begin at 1 1 a.m.. 
three at noon and at 1 p.m. The library has a detailed schedule 
of events for people. 

The library district will sponsor a retirement party for Art . 
Gulatiofthe district staff from 1 until 3 p.m. The public is in- 
vited to stop by for the open house. 

Jar of napalm found in closet 

Round Lake— According to reports compiled between 
the Round Lake Beach Police and the Round Lake Area Fire 
Protection District, a mason jar full of an unidentified blue 
putty that police and fire officials believed to be napalm, was 
found in the closet of David Lee, 17, of 1406 Lotus Drive in 
Round Lake Beach. 

The napalm, a homemade blue gel incendiary device, was 
taken to a sanitary waste disposal district site on Sunset Av- 
enue in RLB and detonated by the Waukegan Bomb Squad. 
No one was injured during the event. 

According to Round Lake Beach Police Deputy Chief 
Jim Simoncclii, the substance was discovered in Lee's 
closet by Lee's family while they were evicting Lee from 
the premises. 

Jaycees spot bowling fundraiser 

Antioch— The Jaycees will sponsor a fund-raiser at Anti- 
och Bowling Lanes to raise funds to send physically and men- 
tally handicapped children to Camp New-Hope. 

The bowling fund-raiser is Saturday; March 21 at 4 p.m. 

The cost is $40 a couple which includes three games of 
Scotch Doubles plus dinner in the Tower Room. There are a 
limited number of bowlers (hat can be accommodated. Early 
sign-up Is encouraged by the Antioch Jaycees. 

Camp New-Hope provides youngsters with many activi- 
ties including outdoor sports, games, and crafts. It teaches the 
camper independence and sportsmanship. 

Children who attend Camp New-Hope must be sponsored 
by a local' Jaycce chapter. For the past five years, Antioch 
Jaycees have sent three or four campers each year. 

Additional information is available from Donna Bcrgl at 
847-838-1045 orTeri Chipman at 847-395-31 1 1 

Grayslake has new director 

Grayslake — Grayslakc's Downtown Merchant's and 
Heritage Association (GDM HA) has a new executive di- 
rector. 

Jerry Badgerow, will take the place of Lisa Heaton, who in 
January, announced her retirement from the post. Heaton had 
held the position since its inception two years ago. 

"I'm retired, after many years, with SkokicYaJIcy (asphalt) 
and I've been kicking around the idea of doing something part 
time. I like people and know a lot of the merchants," said Bad- 
gerow of his new job. 

The GDMHA is a private organization for merchants of the 
downtown historic area. It promotes events to spotlight 
downtown and attract customers. 

Currently there are 55 members in the group out of an ap- 
proximate number of 70 existing business in the core down- 
town area. 






STAY TUNED 

Pick up any off Lakeland Newspapers 11 editions in coming weeks for: 



SEX OFFENDERS 

A series with in-depth 
views of victims of sex 
crimes and some 
of the predators 





CATS CAN SWIM 

The Wildcat Swim Club offers more than 
just competition in the pool 




GET WITH THE BEAT 



Earthvoice 

Incorporates 

drums, 

togetherpess'for 

internal, spiritual 

healing 



C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



March 13, 1998 









Lakeland Newspapers 

William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



William M. Schroeder 

Presldent/C.E.O. 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Editor/Composition Mgr. 




Rhonda Hetrick Burke 

Managing Editor 

30 South Whitney St., Grayslakc, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-01 61 . E-mail: cdit@Ind.com 

EDITORIALS 

Osmond, Smith can 
bring leadership 

U.S. Congress Dist. 8 

Congressman Phil Crane, who represents theOth Dist. that in- 
cludes west Like County, is a respected senior in the Republican 
party with a long record of service that needs no apologies. Crane 
has responded with dignity and reserve to the vicious attacks of 
David McSweeney, a young investment banker who is attempting to 
dislodge Crane. 

We think McSweeney has failed to make a case that Crane's lime 
is past. The campaign draws a telling difference between experi- 
ence and reckless youth. Some of McSweeney's charges are repre- 
hensible. Phil Crane still is the heart and soul of conservative Re- 
publicanism, He is able to serve and lead. 

We recommend Crane's renomination without reservation, 

Secretary of State 

Bob Churchill and Al Salvi represent two different wings of the 
Illinois Republican party— the establishment 
and the independent. 

While both are qualified to handle the ad- 
ministrative duties of the secretary of state of- 
fice (hey seek, the two Like County residents 
undoubtedly would approach the job differ- 
ently. 

Churchill, a product of the GOP establish- 
ment thai has maintained [lower in Spring- 
field tor two decades, can be expected to fol- 
low the sate, traditional approach adhered to 
by Gov. Jim Edgar 
when he served as sec- 
retary of slate, stressing efficiency and econ- 
omy with a hard line on drunk driving. 

As a born legislator, Salvi unquestionably 
would bring imagination and verve to the of- 
fice. A strong indication of i his are some or 
his campaign proposals such as issuing a 
"special" schoolhouse .license plate to benefit 
education and a proposal to save the slate 
S8.3 million by eliminating the front license 
plate. No endorsement here. Salvi 

State Representative Dist. 62 

if you have liked the leadership provided by Bob Churchill for 
the past 18 years, then you'll like Tim Osmond. He is Churchill's 
hand-picked successor and he will rely on Churchill to learn issues 
facing the state and for voting guidance. 

Osmond is either refreshing or frustrating, depending on your 
opinion, in his knowledge of the issues. He admits he needs to learn 
and speaks openly and honestly about his lack of current knowl- 
edge. Osmond adds however, that he will turn to local community 
experts to tutor him. This may not be all bad. 

Paul Petersen is going against the grain in this race. He has 
working knowledge of the issues but his answers don't add up. For 
example, he says the roads in Illinois arc terrible but also says the 
Tollway Authority has done a pretty good job. 

We give Osmond our support. 

State Representative Dist. 52 

Mike Salvi has shown in his second run for this seat that he 
won't be beholden to the wishes of the Republican party bosses. 

Sidney Mathlas of Buffalo Grove is the hand-picked Clayton 
successor. 

The other two candidates, Ray Ivancic and Mark Riefenbcrg 
haven't gained attention in the race as the forerunners. 

We recommend Salvi. lie's determined, hard working and will 
work hard for family goals and conservative principles. 

Lake County Sheriff 

Gary Del Re is a well-educated law enforcement veteran and 
knows how to get along with his county political bosses. He was the 
successor party leaders sought for Clint Grinnell. However, Del Re's 
short-term in office appears to have been just an extension of Grin- 
nell's tenure. He has a great deal of ability and the ability to learn 
and grow. 

Willie Ray Smith is a career lawman. He spent 30 years in the 
sheriff's office working his way up from the bottom. He knows ever)' 
road in Lake County, he knows every department and he knows how 
to live within a budget. 

Smith demonstrates refreshing ideas on how to get more "bang 
for the buck" in Lake County and favors the increased use of inter- 
governmental agreements to beef up patrols throughout the coun- 
ty- 
Del Re is a good sheriff. 

Smith has the knowledge, both formal and street smarts, and the 
grit to be a great sheriff. 
We endorse Smith. 





VIEWPOINT 



Balance imperiled 
by modern politics 



Balance may be another ca- 
sualty of modern politics, 
particularly at the state 
level in Illinois. In crafting 
general election slates, leaders in 
both parties historically weighed 
heavily geography, religion, affilia- 
tions, ethnicity, etc. The reason is 
obvious— to present as broad a 
spectrum of society as possible. 
Irish Catholics in Cook County 
dominated Democratic politics. 
Traditionally, Republicans liked 
candidates with a "son" on the end 
of their surname. Both parties 
liked to match up Chicago area as- 
pirants with a downstate favorite. 
In recent years, gender has been 
given careful consideration in slate 
shaping. Wide open primaries on 
both parties have resulted in mas- 
sive alterations in the politcal face 
of Illinois. 
A historic turn looms in the 
March 17 primary where the possi- 
bility has arisen that three African- 
Americans will garner the top three 
spots on the Democratic ballot. 
Incumbent U.S. Senator Carol 
Moseley-Braun, first black woman 
to serve in the U.S. Senate, is run- 
ning without opposition. Durable 
black politician Roland W. Hurris 
has an excellent chance of being 
nominated for governor. Jesse 
White, recognized as a leader in 
the black community before his 
political success, has a good 
chance of winning his parly's secre- 
tary of state nomination. 

Considering the past success or 
Moseley-Braun and liurris, a for- 
mer comptroller and attorney-gen- 
eral, general election voters have 
long since transcended racial barri- 
ers. Now the question becomes, 
will they jeltison ballot balance? ' 
That's the intriguing question of the 
March 17 primary. 

Hardball politics 

Both sides in the close race for the 
Republican nomination for sheriff 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



are playing hardball. Backers of 
Gary Del Re are whispering that 
Willie Ray Smith is a throwback to 
the corrupt administration nearly 
two decades ago of Sheriff Tom 
Brown. Smith supporters 
arc painting Del Re as a protege of a 
defrocked county chairman. 

Bear icon 

All-time Chicago Bear great status 
is being predicted for Jim Flanigan, 
headlincr for the'98 Health and Fit- 
ness Fair Saturday, March 28, at 
College of Lake County. Armed 
with a long-term contract, a win- 
ning personality and all-pro line- 
man qualifications, Flanigan can 
rank with the Payton, Singletary, 
Rutkus and Luckman. 

Sponsored by Lakeland Publish- 
ers Inc. and CLC, the fair is a multi- 
dimensional event appealing to all 
ages, especially young football fans 
who can get Flanigan's autograph. 
Hint to the youngsters: ask Jim 
about his charitable foundation. 
That's a favorite topic for the good- 
looking ex-Notre Dame star. 

Retiring on top 

Retiring State Rep. Jack L 
Kubik(R-I,aGrange Park) made the 
best argument for term limitation 
we ye ever heard. "Make a contri- 



bution and go home," asserted Ku- 
bik, who is leaving the Illinois Gen- 
eral Assembly voluntarily after 
serving seven illustrious terms rep- 
resenting a west suburban district. 
Kubik, 42, spoke at a testimonial in 
his honor at Lombard. The earnest 
lawmaker, assistant minority 
leader, is highly rospoctcd on both 
sfdes of the aisle. Kubfkmncfc 
noteworthy advances \n property 
tax reform, free speech issues, help 
for seniors and rights of the dis- 
abled.. 

Question of greatness 

The success of the 1998 University 
of Illinois basketball team, Big Ten 
co-champs, has raised a question 
among local fans whether Liber- 
tyville's Matt Heldman belongs in 
the company of former Lake Coun- 
ty hardwood greats. 

This column responds in the afii- 
mative for the three point marks- 
man and floor leader of the Illini. 
This would put Heldman in the 
company of such county luminar- 
ies as Antioch's Dale Barnstable (U. 
of Kentucky); Otto Graham of 
Waukegan, who starred at North- 
western; another NU alum, Billy 
McKinney of Zion who has an illus- 
trious NBA career; Geno Malchior- 
ri, who went from Highland Park 
High to lead Bradley to national 
prominence in the 50s; superb 
Doorman and sharpshooter Denny 
Freund of Wauconda, who upheld 
DePaul's traditions and two ' 
Waukegan grads who enjoyed NBA 
careers, 6- 1 1 Jerome Whitehead, a 
star at Marquette, and Corky Cal- 
houn, an Ivy League standout at 
Penn after his prep days. 

If Lake County basketball histori- 
ans think I missed anyone, get in 
touch and let me know your nomi- 
nation. We'll be happy to share. 
The criteria is a local prep star who 
became a marque player in a Divi- 
sion I program. 



Guest 
commentaries welcome 

Lakeland Newspapers welcomes quest columns hv n.., ,„ ^ „:„ 

terested in writing a column can conS>S?WH ^T t0piCS °' general interest : A ?y° ne £ 
be mailed c/o Lakeland Newspapers PO [*Bol 268^^^ m^L 31 (847) 223 ' 8161 ' SubmJssion * m * y 
line is Friday at noon. rs '™- u °*268 ( GraystakelL, 60030 or fax to (847) 223-8810. Dead- 



M 



- 



March 13, 1998 



OPINIONS 



Lakeland Newspapers / C5 



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PARTY LINES 



PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 

* 

Ratfelters neglecting 
spending disclosure rules 



With less than two weeks 
to go before primary 
election day (at this 
writing), Mark Ratfel- 
ters had yet to file required cam- 
paign finance disclosure forms in his 
drive to unseatCaunty Board Rep. AI 
Westermnn (R-Warren Township). 
Ratfelters, who is trained to be 
precise in his banking profession, 
was creating wonderment both 
among foes and his supporters, in- 
cluding Gurnee Mayor DlckWel- 
ton. 

As a self-professed watchdog of 
taxation, Ratfelters has been spend- 
ing freely for mailings and a head- 
quarters. A fundraiser was held early 
enough to have triggered required 
disclosure reports. 

Westerman supporters were 
delighted that Ratfelters came out 
against a proposed bond issue to re- 
plenish Forest Preserve land acquisi- 
tion funds. Westerman has been 
talking up public land acquisition as 
the best means of stemming unbri- 
dled growth, recognizing need for 
more forest land as a hot button is- 
sue. 

Chairman sweepstakes 

Selection of the next Lake 
County Board chairman is a long 
way ahead, but the early form chart 
is putting incumbent chairman Bob 
Grever, and two Republican regu- 
lars, David stolman and Pom 
Newton, In the running. 

Payback time 

Jon McKendry of Lake Muff, 
an able Republican precinct com- 
mitteeman, has more at stake than 
wrestling a County Board nomina- 
tion from incumbent Mary Beat- 
tie, McKendry, a member of the 
Salvi clan through marriage, can set- 
tle an old score by besting Deattie, 
who directed Lake Forest neighbors 
to take a pass two year's ago in the 
general election when Jon's brother- 
in-law, Al Salvi, was the GOP nomi- 
nee for U.S. Senate. 





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Embroiled in three-way 

rage for county board 

chairman 



Precinct warfare 

Brad Muse says he sees the 
hand of Grant Township Supervisor 



Gordon Klesgen directing traffic in 
Republican precinct affairs in the 
. Tuesday, March 17 primary. Muse 
says his opponent, Robert Sclle, 

was prompted by Kiesgen to run 
against him for a precinct post. 

Sparce pickings 

If you've ever wondered why 
the Democrats aren't a stronger par- 
ty in Lake County, take a look at 
their precinct committee roster. In 
Tuesday's primary, they'll have a bal- 
lot void for committeeman in five of 
18 townships— Antioch, Avon, Cuba 
(Barrington), Ela (Lake Zurich) and 
Grant. They've got only one filed 
precinct candidate In each of three 
townships— Benton, Fremont and 
Wauconda. Only two Democrats 
filed forWarrenTownship's 37 
precincts. 

Different style, party 

The name's the same (last), but 
there the similarity ends. Peggy 
Shorts, Democratic candidate for 
the Lake County Board, Is the step-" 
daughter-in-law of Alice Bonos 
Shorts, who served on the County 
Board 20 years ago as a Republican. 
Alice was known for her stylish attire 
and outspoken demeanor. Peggy Is 
thoughtful and reserved. 

No free lunches 

Once again, "Republicans have ' 
found out that there is no such thing 
as a free lunch. The Antioch Associa- 
tion of Retired Persons knows other- 
wise. Their free lunch March 10 was 
courtesy of District 1 candidate Lin- 
da Pedersen who took a graceful 
way out. Pedersen had wanted to 
sponsor a lunch at which she would 
introduce herself to AARP members. 
Non-political AARP invited Peder- 
scn's opponents Michael 
Mortensen and incumbent Judy 
Martini. Pedersen declined the op- 
portunity to underwrite a forum for 
her opponents. However, she per- 
sonally stood by her offer to pay for 
lunch. 



Sports nicknames 
are getting WILD 



News flash: The Chicago 
Cubs are moving to the 
Philippines where they 
will be known as the 
Manila Polders. 

Another scoop: Latrell 
Sprcwell, the Golden State War- 
riors' basketball player who at- 
tacked, choked and threatened 
to kill his coach, and got off with 
a slap on the wrist, will be traded 
to the Boston Celtics. The Celtics 
will change their name to the 
Boston Stranglers. 

Well, okay, here's a true story: 
Basketball's Washington Bullets 
decided to revise their name so 
It wouldn't include a symbol of 
violence; and some wits suggest- 
ed, well, drop the name Wash- 
ington; 

Instead, they became the 
Washington Wizards, which 
doesn't exactly reflect the kind of 
thinking we associate with our 
nation's capital. 

The science of nicknaming 
sports teams has taken an un- 
comfortable turn. The old-fash- 
ioned way was to name them af- 
ter animals, both ferocious and 
friendly; after birds, both big 
and little; and birds of various 
colors. 

Teams were named after 
cowboys and Indians, saints and 
devils, all kinds of canines and 
every cat in the jungle. But now 
owners seem more intent on 
making a one- word historical or 
sociological statement that Tits 
their particular community. 

Soccer teams includcthe 
New Englapd Revolution, the 
San Jose Clash, the Los Angeles 
Galaxy, the Tampa Bay Mutiny, 
the Dallas Burn and the Chicago 
Fire. Also, adding to the confu- 
sion, is the Miami Fusion, what- 
ever that's supposed to mean. 

Basketball has the Miami 
Heat, the Orlando Magic and the 
Toronto Raptors. I had to look 
up raptor; it's a bird of prey. 

In hockey, Minnesota is call- 
ing its new team the Wild. Other 
new hockey teams are the At- 
lanta Thrashers and the 
Nashville Predators. 

A thrasher is not only some- 
one who flogs another, it's also a 



HMMH^^^t mnmtrtn»Mio»»»«Mt» >mMM»tit*tmtU 




THE 

PFARR 

CORNER 

Jerry Pfarr 



bird. But what do predntors have 
to do with Nashville? Why not 
the Garths or the Dollies? 

If the Chicago Bears move to 
Schattmburg, perhaps they 
should reflect their new home- 
town and be renamed the 
Schaumburg Gridlock. 

Most of our Lakeland area 
high schools have good old-fash- 
ioned mascots: Rams, Mustangs, 
Blue Devils, Panthers, Wildcats, 
Bulldogs and, In Lake Zurich, the 
Bears. 

In Antioch it's the Scquoits, 
nn Indian word for "winding." 
Sequoit Creek winds through 
Antioch, which may have the 
only teams in the world named 
for a prolonged puddle. 

It's sad the way schools with 
teams nicknamed In honor of In- 
dians have caved In to a few 
dilettante do-gooders and sur- 
rendered the traditions they 
treasured. My alma mater, Mar- 
quette University, wimped out 
and went from being Warriors to 
Golden Eagles. 

Goofy gadflies who should 
get a life keep pressuring the 
University ofllllnols to dump its 
marvelous mascot, Chief TUini- 
wek.Fdr almost 70 years stu- 
■ dents playing the chief have 
done a dramatic war dance at 
games; it's one of the most color- 
ful and emotional traditions in 
sports. 

Illinois hasn't caved, nor 
have baseball's Cleveland Indi- 
ans and Atlanta Braves or foot- 
ball's Washington Redskins. 

Chippewa Indian leaders 
once surveyed 3,000 members of 
their tribe and found that the 
vast majority "view the use of In- 
dian names as a point of pride if 
used respectfully and in good 
taste." 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Had enough? Vote none-of-the-above on Tuesday 



With the primary election soon 
upon us, are you fed up with all the 
rhetoric like 1 am? Are you so sick of 
candidates that promise the world 
but can't deliver a pizza? Is the nega- 
tive campaigning getting so bad you 
think you are watching a daytimeTV 
talk show? 

One campaign ad is so bad it 
must be sanctioned by the World 
Wrestling Foundation. Another ad is 
so full of it, it should be thrown out 
with the cat litter. There is so much 
mud slinging, I went out and bought 
some hip boots. 

Therefore, if you are fed up with 
the current political parties, join the 
"None-of-the-above" party. We at the 
"none-of-the-above" party take no 
campaign funds because we have no 
cand idate. We break no promises be- 
cause we make none. We will not de- 
bate any issues because we truly have 
nothing to say. We will not even feel 
your pain. We do believe in affirma- 
tive action. We affirm some sort of ac- 
tion should be done, but heck, what 
can we do about it, we are in politics. 

So, let us send a strong signal to 
the current political parties and truly 
put a real nobody in office. Vote 
"nonc-of-thc-above." The real do 



nothing party. 

Sponsored by your local Pat 

Paulsen fan club. 

Bob Stevens 
Hoffman Estates 

Give Peterson power 

Just a brief note of thanks to III. 
State Senator William E. Peterson for 
the admirable and consistent repre- . 
sentation you continuously afford 
your constituents with your political 
expertise, coupled with your high val- 
ues and standards in the 26th district. 

As a long time resident, and now 
a Route 22 Bypass Committee mem- 
ber of Lake Zurich, you are always 
there to either lake a phone call, re- 
turn a call, answer a letter and/or at- 
tend a meeting, giving your experi- 
enced help and advice when called 
upon. 

It is also refreshing to know, 
should you not be available at the 
time, your office is in very competent 
hands with your Executive Assistant, 
Jan Zobus, who equally is always will- 
ing to help give guidance. 

And to the voters, it is extremely 
important that we get the "vote out in 
record number" in order to give Sen- 
ator Peterson the "ammunition of 



power" when he goes to Springfield 
to represent the 26th District." 

Claudcttc J. Dyback 
lake Zurich resident 

Support Calabresa 

You can usually tell who the can- 
didates think will win by who they 
choose to attack. Carol Calabresa, en- 
dorsed for County Board by the Sier- 
ra Club, many other grass roots 
groups, and theTribune, continues to 
draw fire in the form of half truths. 
Her Ostroga "friends" from the Re- 
publican party were so out of touch 
that they had to conduct a telephone 
poll before their campaign sprouted 
leaves. Now they try to pin the strip- 
ping of Cuneo on her, despite her ob- 
jections to that Depke super-majori- 
ty approval. Criticism from Graham, 
her other opponent, for the same 
event fails to own up to his responsi- 
bility. While we appreciate his mo- 
tives and his arguments, his strong- 
arm methods in the pre-1990 County 
Board are party to blame for the cost- 
ly fall from popularity of land preser- 
vation, and for the reign of "Bulldoz- 
er" Bob Depke until 1996. 

Likewise, Calabresa's actions to 
rescue 200 acres from Grainger, and 



her recent outreach to rescue Liber- 
tyville High School's 40 acre St. Mary's 
Road land, have been grossly distort- 
ed and misrepresented. 

As clearly proven by the recent 
Crossroads Study, our transportation 
woes will be made worse, not better, 
by Route 53. Carol Calabresa has long 
realized that, that simplistic propos- 
al, while destroying Fprest Preserves, 
and critical open space, will be a SI 
billion invitation to new develop- 
ment and more congestion. Now that 
IDOT has decided to take "two years 
to re-evaluate the need for extending 
the tollway through Lake County," it's 
becoming increasingly clear that we 
need more than a "moderate" candi- 
date. We need this informed County 
Board member. 

Carol Calabresa has been a gen- 
eral on the field for the quality of our 
Lake County through much adversi- 
ty. She deserves our support on the 
Republican ballot oja March 17, 

Evan Craig 

Chair, Woods & Wetlands Group of 

the Sierra Club 

O'Kelly deserves vote 

Diana O'Kelly has received the 
endorsements of the two leading en- 



vironmental groups in Lake County. 
For those of us who enjoy open space, 
green grass, and a relaxed quality of 
life so typical of Lake County, these 
endorsements are the most signifi- 
cant that a candidate can receive. 
They are testimony to her strong 
stand against the "no limit to devel- 
opment" lobby that is attempting to 
take control of Lake County. 

Diana has long recognized that a 
stand against uncontrolled develop- 
ment is a stand against congestion, 
crime, pollution, crowded classrooms 
and higher taxes. She deserves your 
vote for the county board seat for Dis- 
trict 10. 

BobBohl 
Mundelein 



Letters welcome 

Letters to the editor are welcome. 
They should be on topics of gener- 
al interest, approximately 250 
words or less. All letters must be 
signed, and contain a home ad- 
dress and telephone number. The 
editor reserves the right to con- 
dense all letters. 



i 






March 13, 1998 



C6 I Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



HOME SWEET HOME 

Wonderful ranch in Aiilioch. Three bed- 
rooms, separate dining room. Oak irini 
Ihrouplioul. New gnr.ige. Fenced yard wiili 
deck nrtd shed, And beach riglits. 5 1 N.'JOt). 



RE/MAX ADVANTAGE 

CAllUIHEFFIRNAN (847) 395-3000 erf 135 
Pager (847) 339-9523 ^ 




ENDURING QUALITY 

in Ihh lovely 4 UK cpiaJ level. Hardwood 
doors ilirmir-lioiil. Impressive floor l« ceiling 
nrenlaec in livin R rni. Urge V\\ w/Midcrs lo 
deck. Across the street from Tores! preserve. 
Great corner lot! SIM/JOO 



RE/MAX ADVANTAGE 

CAllWHEFFIRNAN (847) 395-3000 tit 135 
- Pacer (847) 339-9523 I A 



Round lake 



Trevor/Racine 



or 
www.lno.com 





»-tff iii» i,f> q-y . Jomt it toW 4 *#*M>* : *«t?f " 






^.X'l^VlvI-HvftW"**^' 



Antioch 



CHARMER $177,777 

CtiCMftwle PirmsronttmpoHr^ itory design. Arci of 
well cwtd ftsr homo on small populif development. 3 
bediootn* with master buh, (imily room with bow u in- 
Aw am) calhedril ctilirics. Kitchen with oik cabinets 
,nd wrap i round counter. RrcaVfist bar, professwmlly 
landscaped yard with fence, deck and 2 car garage 



RE/MAtAdvaatage Realty 
Call Cindy Hill 847-395-3000 x 154 



-«.'uj 




GORGEOUS TRM.EVEI $118,500 



uiili caificdral ceilings - skylights - .1 ltd- 
room, 2.5 Iwllts • huge garage - Morula 
room, all only 4 years old. 



RE/MAX Advantage Realty 
Call Coy Cybul 847-395-3000 x 152 



BRAND NEW $126,500 

Construction on beautiful wooded lot - mas- 
ter bedroom suite - .1 UK - 2J> fiA - garage - 
deck - icady for April Occupancy 



RE/MAX Advantage Realty 
Call Cary Cybol 847-395-3000 x 152 



CEDAR SIDED RANCH $124,900 



with full basement - cozy fireplace in living 
room with vaulted ceilings - jacu/?i tub, 
lake rights to Uon Like on 4 lots - all 
appliances, 



RE/MAX Advantage Realty 
Call Cary Cybal 847-395-3000 x 152 



SO MUCH CLASS $154,900 



in this arte owner four bedroom - 2 hath 
home - Huge family room with brick fire- 
place arid lake rights lo Crass Ijiko. 



RE/MAX Advantage Really 
Call Cary Cybul 847-395-3000 x 152 



BEST DEAL! 98,500 

in imvfl.lwuscs - 3 S (ory wilh 2 bedrooms - 
walk in closet. All appliances, 2 car garage, 
C/A, Basement.. Sky 'light, and immediate 
occupancy. 



RE/MAX Advantage Realty ■'•- 
Call Cary Cybul 847-395-3000 x 152 • 



Ineleside 




BRICK RANCH $118,900 

On dead end street, t block from your lake 
rights to the chain-3 bdrms, t.5 bath, 15 car 
garage * screened porch - huge family room 
with lake views. 



RE/MAX Advantage Realty 
Call Cary Cybul 847-395-3000 x 152 



TO ADVERTISE YOUR REAL ESTATE LISTING HERE, PLEASE CONTACT 

Oee Dm Check at 847/223-3200 x 512 • Pager 694-2830 



NEED A POT OF GOLD TO 




UY YOUR OWN HOME... 

DO YOU KNOW HOW MUCH RM YOU Piffi? 



Rent 

$350 
400 
450 
500 
550 
600 
650 
700 
750 
1000 



3 Years 

$12,600 
14,400 
16,200 
18,000 
19,800 
21 ,600 
23,400 
25,200 
27,000 
36,000 



5 Years 

$21,000 
24,000 
27,000 
30,000 
33,000 
36,000 
39,000 
42,000 
45,000 
60,000 



10 Years 

$42,000 
48,000 
54,000 
60,000 
66,000 
72,000 
78,000 
84,000 
90,000 
120,000 



20 Years 

$84,000 
96,000 
108,000 
120,000 
132,000 
1 44,000 
156,000 
168,000 
180,000 
240,000 



30 Years 

$126,000 
144,000 
162,000 
180,000 
198,000 
216,000 
234,000 
252,000 
270,000 
360,000 



WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN OWN' 

Take the first step towards owning your own home by con "dng? 

Carol Packo 

of Mortgage Discount Warehouse* 
300 West Golf Road, Mt. Prospectant 
Call (847) 265-8074 for a FREE loan analys 



Also available: Refinances (Take advantage of the low rates and 

bills), Seconds, Equity Lines, New Construction Purchase FIiA ^ )1 J? olidatc 

Jumbo and "Interesting" Credit Loans' conventional, 



"An Illinois Residential Mortgages Licensee 



BBS 





MINDING 

YOUR 

BUSINESS 

Don Taylor 



There are 
only two kinds 
of people 

There are two kinds of peo- 
ple on earth today, 
Just two kinds of people, 
that's all I say. 

Not the hapy and sad, for the 
quickly flying years 

Bring each one his laughter, 
and each one his tears 

Mot the rich and the poor, for 
to know a man 's wealth 

You must first know the state of 
his conscience and health 

No— the two kinds of people on 
earth that I mean 

Are the people that lift, and the 
people that lean 

In which class are you? Are you 
easing the load, 

of overworked lifters who toil 
down the road? 

Or are you a leaner who lets 
others bear, 

Your portion of sen/ice and la- 
bor and care? 

—Unknown 

A colleague gave me this little 
poem a few weeks ago. I felt the 
main thought was worth sharing 
and I think you'll agree there are 
differences between lifters and 
leaners. 

The difference between 

• Leaners wrestle a gorilla un- 
til they get tired. Lifters wrestle . 
the gorilla until the gorilla gets 
tired. 

* Lctmvrs iilwixys Imve nn ox-— 

CUSC. "I would have done better, 
but...." "I could have finished if...," 
"I'd like to do more, bitf..." My 
cousin says, "If (/Sand butswere 
candy and nuts, we'd all have a 
Merry Christmas." Lifters don't 
make excuses. They don't fix 
blame, they fix problems. 

• Leaners develop a leaner's 
vocabulary. Leaners say, "We tried 
that before," "It won't work," "This 
is good enough," and "I'll do it lat- 
er." Lifters talk positively. Phrases 
like, "Together we can," "Let's do 
it now," "I'll help you," and "We'll 
find a way," are common lifter's 
words. 

• Leaners try once. Lifters try 
again. 

• Leaners compare their ef- 
forts with other leaners. It's the 
I'm OK, you're OK syndrome. 
However, equal doesn't mean ex- 
cellent. Lifters compare them- 
selves with other lifters. If you 
want to be the best, you must 
learn from the best. 

• Leaners go with the flow. 
They follow the path of least re- 
sistance. Lifters direct the flow 
and create a path for others to fol- 
low. 

• Leaners are satisfied with 
meeting quota. They do just 
enough to get by. Lifters are 
achievers. They start their own en- 
gines. They don't rely on others for 
their personal motivation. 

• Leaners are quick to pass the 
buck. "It's not my fault," "1 didn't 
do it," and "It's not my job," are 
standard leaner's laments. Lifters 
take responsibility for their actions 
and help others become account- 
able. 

• Leaners would rather cause 
problems than do actual work. 
Lifters solve problems and don't 
consider it work. 

• Leaners are active. Lifters are 
productive. (If you haven't learned 
the difference between activity 
and productivity, look both words 
up.) 

• Leaners criticize. Lifters 
praise. 

Please see TAYLOR tC8 




March 13, 1998 



Lakeland NewspapersGT 



Anthony Pontiac helps to keep kids safe 



The world froze on the evening 
of Dec. 4, 1993, as Polly Klaas, the 
beautiful girl shown smiling in home 
videos for millions of TV viewers, was 
found dead in Cloverdale, Calif. Ab- 
ducted 65 days earlier from her bed- 
room as her mother slept in the next 
room, America's Child symbolized 
much that is wrong with our society. 

Polly's father, Mark Klaas, is now 
the founder of the Klaas Foundation 
for Children, a nationally recognized 
advocate for protecting children 
against violence. 

Klaas Foundation child safety 



programs are designed to promote 
awareness and education for parents 
and children in an effort to protect 
children against violence. 

Goals for the Klaas Foundation 
include: to provide nationwide 
parental awareness and child safety 
information; to encourage partner- 
ships between neighborhoods, law 
enforcement, organizations, and the 
private sector that create safe, crime 
free communities; and to promote 
legislative reform that effectively 
protects children from abuse, ne- 
glect and abduction. 



Klaas will be speaking at a Town 
Hall meeting to be held Monday, 
March 16, at Anthony Pontiac GMC 
Buick, 2727 Belvidere Rd., Route 1 20, 
Waukegan, at 7:30 p.m. From 10 a. m. 
to 7 p.m., parents can bring their 
children in to participate in the Pho- 
to and Fingerprint ID Program. 

One of the tools used to protect 
children is the Photo and Fingerprint 
ID Program. This program, designed 
by the Secret Service to protect the 
President, includes photographs, a 
fingerprint card, identification sec- 
tion for parents to fill out; safety tips 



for parents and children and com- 
munity action tips. The packet re- 
mains in the parents' possession and 
provides a proven action plan to fol- 
low if their child disappears, plus the 
necessary information to launch an 
investigation and produce a missing 
child flier. 

The Photo and Fingerprint ID 
Program uses no ink or film. It is free 
and the information is for parents' 
records only. It will not be distrib- 
uted to anyone. For more informa- 
tion, call Michael Washko at 244- 
1010. 



Early delivery available on homes at The Conservancy 



A combination of custom homes 
and new 1998 pricing has created tai- 
lor-made deals for buyers at The 
Conservancy in Gurnee. 

Four homes are available for im- 
mediate delivery at the community 
being developed by Rembrandt 
Homes, the custom division of Sun- 
dance Homes. Those who buy one of 
these four houses can move in with- 
in 30 'days, said Joseph Edmeier, 
president of Rembrandt Homes. 

The homes available for imme- 
diate delivery are the 2,680 square- 
foot Rhapsody for $253,577; the 
3,085 square-foot Sonata for 
$304,040; the 2,780 square-foot 
Crescendo for $295,990. 

"These homes are beautiful ex- 
amples of the type of living residents 
■cnjoyntThe Conservancy,** Edrfteler 
said. "Special Incentives on these 
homes. for immediate delivery can 
undoubtedly help buyers make their 
dream home a reality." 

One of the homes, the Rhap- 
sody, features two stories with four 
bedrooms; 2 1 /2 baths; central foyer 
with hardwood floors; kitchen with 
cooktop island, walk-in pantry and 
butler's pantry; breakfast area; fami- 
ly room with fireplace/entertain- 
ment center; first-floor den; master 
bedroom with sitting area; vaulted 
ceiling in the bath; separate shower 
and double-bowl vanity; three other 
bedrooms served by a hall bath; 
nine-foot ceilings on the first floor; 
central air conditioning; basement; 
first-floor laundry room and at- 
tached two-car garage. 

"The elegance at The Conser- 
vancy is something we're very proud 
of and we believe residents are 
proud, too," Edmeier said. "The 
neighbor care deeply about their 
community and it shows. They have 
a tremendous amount of respect for 
their neighbors and take pride in 
their homes. These are things that 
money can't buy." 







The 3,085-square-foot Sonata is one of four homes available for immediate delivery at The Con- 
servancy in Gurnee, a community being developed by Rembrandt Homes, the custom division of 
Sundance Homes. — Submitted photo 



The Conservancy will include 98 
homes when complete, ranging from 
1,650 to 3,118 square feet, priced 
from $209,900. 

The community is enhanced by 
an 11-acre nature preserve. Resi- 
dents enjoy serenity amid mature 
trees, a park with a pond and gazebo 
near the entrance. 

"The homes themselves are 
breathtaking, but we've made a 
real effort to insure the natural sur- 
roundings remain intact," Edmeier 
said. "We realize those features are 



priceless to some buyers, especial- 
ly those who have longed for 
everything a custom home has to 
offer." 

The amenities near The Conser- 
vancy are priceless, as well. Lake 
County offers numerous parks and 
lakes, as well as recreational activities 
including riding stables, golf courses 
and Six Flags Great America amuse- 
ment park. 

Shopping enthusiasts enjoy 
Gurnee Mills outlet mall and a vari- 
ety of stores along Illinois Hwy. 132, 



which also features countless 
restaurants. 

The community is near Int. 
Hwy. 94 and commuter train ser- 
vice providing access to the Chica- 
go Loop and O'Hare International 
Airport. 

To visit The Conservancy, take 
Int. Hwy. 94 to 111. Hwy. 132 west to 
Route 45 south to Washington Street 
east to Hillview Drive. Sales center 
hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily or 
evenings by appointment. For more 
information, call 223-2358. 



Home ownership can become a tax advantage 



In 1995, more 116 million indi- 
viduals filed a federal income tax re- 
turn, according to the Internal Rev- 
enue Service (IRS). Of these, approx- 
imately 88.8 million received a re- 
fund, while 27,5 million were left 
digging through their pockets and 
wondering if they utilized every tax 
deduction. 

"It's no secret homeowners re- 
ceive significant tax advantages 
compared to renters," said Tim 
Cranston, vice president regional 
manager for the Grayslake area of 
Norwest Mortgage, Inc. the nation's 
leading provider of home mortgages. 
"Basically, renters are not eligible for 
any federal property or real estate tax 
deductions, while state deductions 
arc few and fur between." 

Federal and many state tax laws 
allow homeowners to claim deduc- 



tions for all real estate property taxes 
and interest paid on mortgages every 
year. For example, a homeowner 
with a SI 15,000 home can deduct all 
or their real es- 



advance. It also gives you the major- 
ity of the year to accumulate enough 
interest to achieve the standard fed- 
eral threshold ($6,700 for married 
couples) for 



tate taxes ac- 
crued during the 
year, approxi- 
mately $1,500— 
plus $8,000 in 
mortgage inter- 
est—for a total 
deduction of 
$9,500. 

Cranston 
also noted that 
timing can affect 

your tax return. "Closing during the 
first of die year allows you to deduct 
a portion of your property taxes and 
interest, and occasionally any 
points— as long as they are paid in 



'It's no secret homeowners 

receive significant tax 

advantages compared 

to renters.' 

Tim Cranston vice president 

egional manager 

Nonvest Mortgage, Inc. 



itemized deduc- 
tions," 

Anoth- 
er tax benefit, 
commonly re- 
ferred to as the 
"24 - mo nth 
rollover replace- 
ment rule," al- 
lows homeown- 
ers to defer capi- 
tal gains indefi- 
nitely as long as they move into an 
equally priced or more expensive 
home. However, a homebuyer must 
purchase the new home within 24 
months of selling their old home to 



avoid paying a capital gains tax. 

Finally, homeowners over the 
age of 55 can take advantage of the 
$125,000 one-time tax-free capital 
gains exclusion to avoid paying tax- 
es on that portion of their capital 
gain. 

Homeowners not versed on the 
many tax regulations should consult 
a tax adviser about available federal 
or state income tax benefits. 

For more information about 
mortgage products and services, vis- 
it Norwest Mortgage on the Internet 
at www.norwest.com, or call 1-800- 
405-8067 for information on the 
branch in your area. 

Editor's note: To receive a copy of 
this information electronically, con- 
tact Jon Ferchtm at Nonvest Mortgage 
at (515) 221-7372 or e-mail 
jonferchen@nmb.nonvest.com. 



• 



> •. +. •■ ■ -• ;.-" 



C8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE 



March 13, 1998 



BUSINESS REVIEW 

COUNTY NEWS ■ ■ . 

is so/e/y responsible for sales, contents and collection of the Review section 



THE KANE SERVICE 



ft seems that crime continues to rise 
every day in this country. From small 
towns to busy cities, crime is growing 
at a staggering pace. Your only defense 
against becoming a victim of crime is 
to protect yourself. Businesses large 
and small depend on 1 JE KANE 



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centers and more know they can rely 
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THE KANE SERVICE'S certified 
security officers are available uni- 
formed or plainclothed. armed or un- 
armed. These experts specialize in the 



SERVICE, located in Schaumburgal protection ofall industrial, commercial 



999 Plaza Drive, Suite 380, phone 
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Office buildings, construction sites, 
retail stores, hotels, apartments, auto 
dealerships, warehouses, shopping 



and institutional buildings. All guards 
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Don't be caught off guard. Let these 



security specialists handle all of your 
protection needs. Their many years of 
experience backed by hard-working 
officers guarantee the most effective 
security service possible. Put THL 
KANE SERVICE on the job today and 
sleep well tonight, knowing your prop- 
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Wc, the Authors of (bis 1998 Busi- 
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proud to recommend this excellent 
firm Tor all of your commercial se- 
curity needs. 



alersnips. warehouses, snoppine. i/un i uk t.iu^m u.. tl . u .v.. ~— •m-m-^^'m /fw~\ 

AHLGRIM & SONS FUNERAL HOME 



When the time comes to give your 
loved one a memorable tribute and a 
caring service, families throughout the 
entire area have conic to depend on 
AHLGRIM A SONS FUNERAL 
HOME. They are conveniently located 
at 415 South Bucsching Road in Lake 
Zurich, phone (847)540-8871. Serv- 
ing the residents of the community for 
many years now. these professionals 
offer dignified and affordable services 
for all faiths. I're-arrangements arc also 
available. 
This locally owned and operated busi 



Douglas R. Ahlgrim 

ness offers professional service by un- 
derstanding and concerned people. 
They offer ample. well-Jit. off-street 
parking and are handicap accessible. 
The entire staff understands the enor 



decision, the caring staff and director* 
01 AHLGRIM & SONS FUNERAL 
HOME hope they can assist you at 
your lime of need. They've been help- 
ing families and have been the trusted 



I III. (.11(111. .1UIII UNUVIJIIUIUJ ,11b hiui ■ ■■£, -- • C 

mous grief that families undergo at this choice for many years, lor more mlor 



lime. Because of this. AHLGRIM & 
SONS FUNERAL HOME provides 
you with personal attention and help 
on related matters at any time and in- 
viles you to compare costs. 
Only you can decide what's best for 
you. your family and your loved ones. 
When you must make this important 



mation, call (847) 540-8871. 
The Editors of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide arc 
pleased to be able to recommend this 
outstanding facility to all of our read- 
ers. 



EVERLASTING MEMORIALS 



Lucy Piwowarczyk, Proprietor * "A Lasting Tribute" 

decide upon the proper monument for plete cleaning, lettering and refinish- 
vour loved one. ing of your stone. 

EVERLASTING MEMORIALS is The Writers of this 1998 Business 
located in Wild wood at 33107 North Review & Reference Guide suggest 
Highway 45. phone (847) 223-9240. when you arc in need of any type of 
and specializes in a large selection of memorial, look to EVERLASTING 

MEMORIALS, a local company 
willi experience and compassion. 
Viiu will find the quality of their 
work outstanding, their prices af- 
fordable and personalized service 
that is second to none. 



Serving the memorial needs of the corri- 
muniiv formanv vears. EVERLAST- 
ING MEMORIALS has been assist- 
ing families with their selection of 
bcauuful monuments, markers and 
mauscAcums. People ihrougYioul \\\c 
area have come lo know and Vrusl E.V- 
ERLAST1NG MEMORIALS to 
handle all of their memorial needs dur- 
ing times of despair. Their caring stuff 
understands and respects your feelings, 
and wild careful thought will help you 



ADECCO SA is ihe new global leader 
in personnel services. ADECCO was 
formed in September. 19% by the 
merger of Adia SA of Switzerland, and 
the French company. F.cco SA. Swiss- 
based ADECCO now has over 3,000 
offices in 40 countries worldwide, the 
most extensive global network in the 
industry. 
ADECCO is an international person- 



granite, marble and bronze monu- 
ments. They arc available in all siz.es 
and colors, and they will gladly cus- 
tom design something truly special for 
you. If you already have an existing 
memorial, this reliable firm offers com- 

ADECCO 

The Employment People 

nel service corporation, providing busi- 
ness solutions for companies at the lo- 
cal, regional, and global levels. 
ADECCO delivers one consistent, re- 
liable product — people. Wherever the 
need for quality services in temporary 
help, permanent placement, consulting, 
auditing, and outplacement, ADECCO 
supplies the best employees available, 
selected and trained by local branch 



office managers who really understand 
their customers' needs. 
Your local ADECCO office is at 880 
South Milwakce in Libcrtyvillc. l : or 
complete information call ADECCO 
at 362-9305. 

The Writers of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide recom- 
mend ADECCO for all your person- 
nel service needs. 



THE CABINET PEOPLE 

"Don't Replace-Reface" * Serving The Area For Over 20 Years 



If you want your kitchen remodeled or 
modernized, ii is to your advantage lo 
see a reliable company with the expe- 
rience lo do the work properly. At 
THE CABINET PEOPLE, they of- 
fer an affordable option far complete 
kitchen remodeling and have become 
well-known in this area for their out- 
standing products and workmanship. 
The many jobs they have completed for 
miles around are a testimony lo their 
exceptional ability. 

The process utilized by these profes- 
sionals is relacing. where existing door 
and drawer fronts are removed and re- 



placed with a variety of solid hard- 
woods and laminates. All exterior sur- 
faces and outside framing is covered 
lo match. They can also add additional 
cabinets if necessary. They have a vast 
assortment of hardware to highlight any 
decor. Their custom work is the pride 
or many homes throughout the area, 
and will add beauty and value to your 
kitchen. 

Let ihe professionals at THE CABI- 
NET PEOPLE plan every detail for 
you. from design lo final installation, 
They are located in Wheeling at 200 
Larkin Drive, and may be reached at 



(847)^ 520-4920 for a free estimate. 
Custom kitchens don't have to be ex- 
pensive. Call THE CABINET 
PEOPLE, and let them explain just 
how inexpensively you can have your 
dream kitchen installed today. THE 
CABINET PEOPLE arc proud to an- 
nounce they are now featuring 
Wikonurt laminate flooring. 
The Writers of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide recom- 
mend you contact THE CABINET 

PEOPLE for your dream kitchen 
today! 



PANCIC CLASSIC HAIR 



.Don't sit there with a feeling of defeat! 
Today, there is a solution to baldness 
or thinning hair that will allow you to 
be the active man you want to be. 
Whether young or old, almost all men 
experience some degree of hair loss at 
some point in their lives. Although this 
is not physically painful, it can be quite 
disturbing emotionally. The profes- 
sionals at PANCIC CLASSIC HAIR 
take hair loss seriously. 
With their exclusive non-surgical sys- 
tem of replacing hair, you cannot find 
a more natural hair replacement any- 
where in the world. Their permanent 
attachment is recommended for the 



Herta Pancic, Owner 

active male losing hair from natural 
effects due to inherited traits. 
PANCIC CLASSIC HAIR can give 
you the freedom lo be active and con- 
fident again with their revolutionary 
solution lo baldness. Their hair re- 
placement allows you to shower, sham- 
poo, blow dry, comb and brush, swim 
and sleep in your hair. They also offer 
a selection of medical and chemo- 
therapy wigs at reasonable prices. In 
addition, they will care for your hair 
by conditioning, cleaning and styling 
it when needed. 

For a private and expert consultation 
at no obligation, cal I them at 797-99 1 1 , 



Free "Marketing Small 
Business" Seminar Offered 



By KENNETH PATCHEN 
Staff Reporter 



Marketing a small business to 
potential customers is the focus of a 
free, half-day seminar sponsored by 
the Grayslake Economic Develop- 
ment Commission and the state 
Bank ofthe Lakes. 

' The seminar is Thursday, Mar. 19 
from 7:30 a.m. to noon at the State 
Bank of the Lakes building in 
Grayslake on Center Street. 

Featured speakers are Kevin Ty- 
nan of Tynan Marketing, Inc., Don Pe- 
terson of Marketing and Sales Service, 
Inc., and David Enquist of Enquist & 
Associates, Inc. 

Required reservations may be 
arranged Willi Sharon Harrison at 847- 
548-2700, Space is limited. 

The seminar will focus on four 
concerns related to marketing a 
business. Speakers will explain how 
to define a target market. Methods 
to reach that targeted market with 
appropriate marketing will be iden- 
tified. New media available, other 
than advertising, to reach that mar- 
ket will be discussed. Marketing 
strategies will be described. 



The final session 'will feature open 
discussion and discussion about local 
success stories. 

Tynan is President of a 14 year old 
Chicago-based firm that designs and 
implements marketing programs for 
90 clients in the fields of finance,' 
healthcare, politics, and real estate. 

Tynan has received three Golden 
Trumpet Awards from the Publicity 
Club of Chicago, four Eagle Awards 
from the Chicago Financial Advertis- 
ers, and top honors from the Illinois 
Healthcare Public Relations Society. 
Tynan Marketing also won a Pollic 
Award for creating the best political 
brochure in the country for Senator 
Carol Moseley-Braun. 

Tynan is author of Exposure! How 
to Market So Your Message is Un- 
avoidable published by Dartnell. His 
previous book Multi-Channel Market- 
ing was a selection of the Fortune 
(magazine) BookClub, 

Peterson has been involved in 
sales marketing for over 35 years. He 
works with small companies to form 
competitive strategicmarkctingplans. 

Enquist provides full-consulting 
services to small businesses about 
their unique financial situations. 



THIS WAY TO WEALTH 



Tax free money with 
Roth IRA unique plan 



For anyone who is saving money 
for retirement, higher education or a 
new home, Congress has finally pro- 
vided you with a wonder new tax-free 
account, a Roth IRA. The Roth IRA 
was one ofthe new benefits provided 
in the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997. 

A Roth IRA is unlike any savings 
accounts that has ever existed. An In- 
dividual can invest up to $2,000 
($4 ,000 for husband and wife) per year 
into this account. Unlike a traditional 
IRA, there is no tax deduction for this 
contribution, but all the money grows ' 
on a tax-deferred basis and you can 
withdraw all of your money tax-free. 
Individuals With an annual adjusted 
gross income below $90,000 ($150,000 
for join filers) can qualify. 

Roth IRA's are primarily used for 
retirement savings, but there are 
many "qualified" ways to withdraw 
money lax-free before retirement. 

These are: 

1. higher education expenses; 

2. qualified first time home buyer, 

3. qualified medical care expens- 
es or health insurance premiums; 

4. age 59.5 years or older, 5. sub- 
stantially equal payments based upon 
life expectancy; 

6. death or disability of account 
holder. 

If you withdraw from your Roth 
IRA before age 59.5 for any reason 
other than the above, your original 
principal will be considered the first 
amount withdrawn and therefore, not 
taxable {you have already paid taxes 
on this amount). Any of the earnings 
withdrawn before age 59.5 except for 
the above items will be taxable at your 
regular utx rale plus you will pay a 10 
percent penalty. 

The government will allow you lo 



convert any of your existing IRA ac- 
counts into Roth IRA's, thus making 
them tax-free, as well. However, be- 
fore converting you should be aware 
that the value ofthe existing account 
would become taxable. 

You will have, four years lit which 

to pay die taxes and can only qualify for 
this benefit if your adjusted gross in- 
come is less than $100,000. You should 
consider making the conversion if you 
feel your tax rate will ultimately in- 
crease or the idea of tax-free income in 
retirement is appealing to you. 

If you anticipate expenses for 
higher education or the purchase of a 
first home (or a new home if you have 
not been a homeowner for more than 
two years) you should consider in- 
vesting in the Roth IRA. Because the 
growth on your investment is tax-free, 
it will accumulate much faster than in 
a taxable account. 

For instance, assuming you are in 
the 28 percent tax bracket, investing 
$2,000 a year for an 18 year period, 
with a return or 8 percent, you will 
have an accumulation of $74,900, as 
well as tax-free access to these funds. 
The same money invested in a taxable 
account would be valued at only 
$60,424 over the same period. 

If you would like to receive a free 
report on these and other benefits of 
investing in a Roth IRA, call 564-9371 
(outside Chicagoland 1 -(800) 542- 
8289.) You can also write 601 Skokie 
Blvd., Ste. 504, North brook, 1L 600 62. 

David Hennings, an author for 
this Way to Wealth, is senior advisor 
with Jerome Alexander Associates, 
working with individuals and busi- 
nesses to help them achieve their fi- 
nancial goals. 



or visit their salon located in Arling- 
ton Heights at 805 West Rand Road. 
Providing ;i statc-of-ihe-art solution lo 
hair loss, they promise a professional 
service and a custom natural style 
suited to your individual need. Re- 
member, if it looks like a hair replace- 
ment, it's not from PANCIC CLAS- 
SIC HAIR. Open Monday thru Thurs- 
day, 9:00 to 8:00pm, and Friday and 
Saturday. 9:00am to 5:00pm. 
The Writers of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide recom- 
mend PANCIC CLASSIC HAIR to 
all our readers. 



FROM PAGE C7 



TAYLOR: Are you a 

lifter or a leaner on the job? 

• Leaners say whatever is on 
their mind. Lifters say what should 
be said— but tactfully! I had a boss 
who knew how to be tactful. One Fri- 
day afternoon he called me into his 
office and said, "Don, you're a bright 
young man. You have great poten- 
tial. I don't know how this company 
could ever get along without you. 



However, come Monday morning 
we're going to try." In my next job 1 
learned to be a lifter. 

Don Taylor is the co-author of 
"Up Against the Wal- Marts." You 
may write to him in care of "Mind- 
ing Your Own Business," P.O. Box 
67, Amarillo, TX 79105. 



March 13, 1998 



BUSINESS Lakeland Newspapers/ 09 



Ten ways to improve 
your cash flow 



When most people hear the 
term cash flow, ihey think of a 
business. But your family's cash 
flow is as important as that of any 
business. The Illinois CPA Society 
of CPAs says there are ways you 
can improve your cash flow so that 
you'll have more money to save 
and use for the things that are im- 
portant to you. Here are 10 sugges- 
tions to implement in the New 
Year: 

1. ADJUST YOUR 
WITHHOLDING 

Far too many people smugly 
take pride in getting a large refund 
check from the Internal Revenue 
Service (IRS). What they don't real- 
ize is that it's smarter to change 
your withholding and free up cash 
for your own use. To do so, ask 
your employer for a new W-4 and 
use the worksheet to determine 
the correct amount of withholding. 
The extra money you get In each 
paycheck can be invested so it's 
you — and not the IRS - that earns 
interest on your money. 

2. KEEP TRACK OF HOW 
YOU SPEND YOU MONEY 

By keeping a detailed record of 
where your money goes, you can 
get a grip on your finances and im- 
prove your cash flow. Personal fi- 
nance software is available that 
can help you balance your check- 
book, track expenses by category, 
and make year-to-year compar- 
isons. 

3. REFINANCE YOUR 
MORTGAGE 

. Ifyou're paying nbove-markel 
rates cm your mortgage, refinanc- 
ing your loan can free tip n stgnin- 

cant amount of monthly cash. Bet- 
ter yet, see if your lender is willing 
to modify your mortgage agree- 
ment which essentially gels you to- 
day's going rate without paying for 
refinancing costs. 

4. RETHINK YOUR 
BANKING RELATIONSHIP 

As the result of bank mergers 
during recent years, many con- 
sumers don't know what service 
fees they're paying. Carefully re- 
view your banking needs and then 
shop around to learn about the ac- 
count options different banks of- 
fer. The key to cutting the cost of 
banking is to find a bank that 
charges the least for'the services 
you use most. 

5. SLASH YOUR 
INSURANCE COSTS 

If you're carrying a S100 or 
$250 deductible on your auto or 
homeowner's insurance policy, 
consider upping your deductible 
to $500. Put the mouey.you save in 
monthly premium costs away and 
use it toward the deductible 
should you need to Tile a claim. 



6. TAKE A LOOK AT 
YOUR PROPERTY TAXES 

In many parts of the country, 
real estate values have leveled or 
dropped. If your property tax as- 
sessment is outpacing the resale 
value of your home, consider chal- 
lenging any increase in "the as- 
sessed value of your home. Con- 
tact your town for instructions on 
how to go about challenging your 
assessment. 

7. KEEP TRACK OF 
MISCELLANEOUS 
DEDUCTIONS 

Miscellaneous expenses — in- 
cluding unreimbursed business 
expenses, professional and union 
dues, and investment and tax 
counseling fees — are deductible 
to the extent that they exceed two 
percent of your adjusted gross in- 
come. To ensure that you don't 
overlook a tax deduction, add up 
all qualified expenses. Remember, 
the less you pay in taxes, the more 
you an improve your cash flow. 

8. REDUCE YOUR 
CREDIT CARD DEBT 

It makes little sense to pay the 
typical credit card rates of 17 or 10 
percent when there are other op- 
tions. If your credit card debt is 
having a negative effect on your 
cash flow, consider taking out a 
home equity loan at a lower inter- 
est rate to pay off your credit card 
balances. In general, interest pay- 
ments on home equity debt are de- 
ductible; credit card is not. 

9. AUTOMATE 
YOUR PAYCHECK 

'"Another way to Improve 'your 
cash How Is to arrange to have your 
paycheck — and other payments 
you receive regularly, like govern- 
ment and dividend checks • de- 
posited directly. to your bank ac- 
count. You'll save a trip to the 
bank, get your money sooner, and 
avoid waiting for your check to 
clear. 

10. CHANGE OLD 
HABITS 

Think about what you are 
spending money on before you 
spend it. Bring lunch to work in- 
stead of buying it. ..borrow library 
books instead of buying new 
ones.. .make phone calls when 
rates are lower. Even small 
changes such as these will help 
you improve your cash flow and 
make strides toward a more secure 
financial life. 

The Illinois CPA Society is the 
stale professional association rep- 
resenting over 26,000 certified 
public accountants throughout 
Illinois. For information on addi- 
tional CPA Society programs, 
events, products and services, in- 
dividuals can visit the Society's 
Web site at http:/www.icpas.org. 



Architects to lead free public seminar 
'Getting the home you really want' 



Are you planning to build a 
home, remodel your kitchen or ren- 
ovate? The Chicago chapter of 
American Institute of Architects 
(AIA Chicago) is sponsoring a pop- 
ular public seminar in March to 
help home owners with the design 
and construction process. 

The workshop, entitled "Work- 
ing With an Architect," will be held 
at the College of Lake County, Lake 
Shore Campus, Waukegan and will 
be led by resourceful residential ar- 
chitects. 

Workshop leaders will provide 
information and answer questions 
about the role of owner, architect, 
contractor and building of ficial; the 
phases of a project from budget to 



drawings to construction; and lips 
on choosing an architect, including 
how to review a portfolio, check ref- 
erences and assess affordabilily. In 
addition, seminar participants will 
view the AIA video "Investing in a 
Dream: A Guide to Getting the 
Home You Really Want" and re- 
ceive reference materials. 

The "Working With an Archi- 
tect" seminar is free and open to 
the public. Prc-rpgistration is re- 
quired. For information and to reg- 
ister, call AIA Chicago at (312) 670- 
7770. The workshop schedule is 
Saturday, March 7 at 1 to 3 p.m. in 
Room N 119, Lake Shore Campus at 
the College of Lake County, 330 N. 
Genesee, Waukegan. 





Regency 



For the rest of a lifetime, it's RE- 
GENCY INN in Antioch, phone 395- 
3606. Easily accessible at 350 Route 
173, this top-rated mate! is just the 
ticket for the road-weary traveler who 
heeds rest, relaxation and, above all, 
the most peaceful, luxurious surround- 
ings possible. 

You'll find the accommodations to be 
among Ihc very finest with plenty of 



John D. Kaperka, CHA/General Manager 



free parking, spacious, well- ventilated 
rooms, spotless baths, Presidential 
Suite, Jacuzzi, wet bar, meeting room 
and indoor pool. A stay at this haven 
of rest will leave you ready to continue 
your journey in great shape. The rates 
are very reasonable and the rooms are 
among the nicest anywhere... what 
more could you want? 
Plan now to stay at REGENCY INN 



whenever you're in Antioch. You're 
sure to enjoy your trip a lot more when 
you stay at one of the nicest places in 
town! 

The Writers of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide suggest 
that you'll find the rooms, the ser- 
vice AND the rates at REGENCY 
INN to be among the very best! < 



LIBERTYVILLE IMAGING 



In today's advanced field of medical 
technology, there arc many diagnostic 
procedures that physicians rely upon 
to attain a precise diagnosis. Magnetic 
Resonance Imaging (MRI), which is 
truly state-of-the-art technology, has 
proven to be one of the most accurate 
diagnostic procedures available today. 
LIBERTYVILLE IMAGING CEN- 
TER, located at 333 Peterson Road, 
specializes in all aspects of MRL This 
procedure utilizes a high" field magnet.' 
radio frequency waves, and computers 
to visualize the inside of the body. Soft 
tissue images produced by MRI have 
proven to be superior to other imaging 
modalities. During the MRI procedure. 



the patient just relaxes while the im- 
aging is performed. The advantages 
of MRI is that it is non-invasive, no 
radiation is used, and the patient feels 
no pain or discomfort. The caring staff 
at LIBERTYVILLE IMAGING is 
highly skilled, experienced and re- 
spected throughout the medical com- 
munity. In addition to their imaging 
services, they offer free transportation, 
twilight sedation, same-day schedul- 
ing, evening and weekend hours and 
24-hour turn-a-round time on films/re- 
ports. 

The University of Illinois radiologists 
on staff at LIBERTYVILLE IMAG- 
ING CENTER arc board certified and 



specialize in neuroradiology, muscu- 
loskeletal, orthopaedic and sports in- 
juries. The doctors are always avail- 
able . for consultation. 
LIBERTYVILLE IMAGING CEN- 
TER invites you to call them to ask 
any questions, discuss additional infor- 
mation, or to schedule an appointment. 
Please call today at (847) 549-8000: 
We, the Editors of this 1998 Busi- 
ness Review & Reference Guide, 
would like to take this opportunity 
to recommend LIBERTYVILLE 
IMAGING CENTER to all our read- 
ers. 



DICARLO'S ARMANETTI LIQUORS MUNDELEIN 

"Largest Retail Liquor Store In The Lake County Area" 



There arc plenty of reasons to cel- 
ebrate, and DICARLO'S 
ARMANETTI LIQUORS 

MUNDELEIN can get you well on 
your way with their large assortment 
of wine and liquor to meet every need. 
Conveniently located in Mundelcin AT 
425 Townline Road, phone 566-4600. 
Ihey have become one of the most popu- 
lar liquor stores in the entire area. 
All of the most well-known brands or 
scotch, bourbon, whiskey, rum. gin. 
tequila and vodka are stocked where 
you can most easily find your favorite. 



Cream liqueurs, cordials, brandy and 
aperitifs can be found on their well- 
stocked shelves. They feature one of 
(he largest selections of domestic and 
imported wines as well as the largest 
selection "of specialty and micro- 
brewed heer in the Chicagolantl area 
will) over 850 types in stock. 
When vou shop at DICARLO'S 
ARMANETTI LIQUORS 

MUNDELEIN. you can be sure or 
getting the'brands you like at competi- 
tive prices and friendly, efficient ser- 
vice. Ifyou're planning a party or just 



restocking your liquor cabinet, make 
your first stop at DICARLO'S 
ARMANETTI LIQUORS 

MUNDELEIN. Their products, prices 
and service are sure to make your eel- " 
ebration extra special. DICARLO'S 
ARMANETTI LIQUORS 

MUNDELEIN takes this opportunity 
to ask that you drink responsibly and 
always have a designated driver. 
The Writers of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide recom- 
mend this excellent retail liquor 
store to all our readers. 



HILLERY'S BBQ 

John Hillery, Proprietor 



Who makes the mast mouth watering, 
finger lickin' barbecue around? Who 
lias that famous smoked flavor thai 
everyone yearns Tor? The answer is 
simple, but their secret recipe is not. 
HILLERY'S BBQ is located in 
Waukegan at 2021 North Lewis Av- 
enue, phone 336-0033, and in North 
Chicago at 1617 I4 lh Street, phone 
473-1722. 

Their taste-lcmpting meaty ribs are 
smoked. Hardwood grilled lo sizzling 
perfection, only fresh meat and poul- 
try are used in their secret recipe. 



■ You'll find chicken along with beer, 
pork, fish and shrimp. Of course, lots 
of barbecue wilh cole slaw is featured. 
When you come in to HILLERY'S 
BBQ bring your appetite along. 
They're not only famous for their out- 
standing food, bin also for large help- 
ings. Ifyou're planning*!) family out- 
ing, business meeting or church func- 
tion, let HILLERY'S BBQ handle 
your catering needs. 
You know the food is scrumptious, their 
service is friendly, and their prices sim- 
ply can't be beat. No gathering is too 



large or too small. Their hours of op- 
eration are Sunday and Monday from 
I lam to 8pm. Tuesday through Thurs- 
day from I Oam lo I Opm. and Friday 
and Saturday from I Oam lo 10:30pm. 
We, the Writers of this 1998 Busi- 
ness Review & Reference Guide 
know that when it comes (o barbe- 
cue, you shouldn't settle for second 
best. For the most meaty, juicy and 
finger lickin' food around, stop in at 
HILLERY'S BBQ today. 



MIDWEST AGGREGATE 



When you need sand and gravel lo com- 
plete a construction project, vou need 
it right now! At MIDWEST AGGRE- 
GATE in Antioch, Illinois at 2843S 
West Route 173, phone (847) 395- 
2595. you' II never have problems with 
your order not being filled promptly 
and delivered on schedule! These 
qualified professionals of the sand and 
gravel business can offer you, the cus- 



tomer, more in terms of quality prod- 
ucts and the very fastest service! They 
can supply any amount of graded and 
sized gravel, crushed rock, fill materi- 
als, topsoil. concrete, road base, ap- 
proved filter sand, washed sand, gar- 
den sand, or other related products. 
MIDWEST AGGREGATE also has 
a comprehensive listing of specialty 
contractors, who will do a particular 



job for you. if you desire. For small 
loads, they offer money-saving pit ser- 
vice on sand and gravel for 
homeowners. Sec this full service or- 
ganization for ALL of your sand and 
gravel needs. 

The Writers of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide recom- 
mend them to all of our renders. 



WINDFALL ENTERPRISES, INC. 

Owner - Ron Falese 



Motivate your company's employees idly changing business environment, 
with a cuslom designed office from the They can offer office layout suggestions 
office equipment professionals at to improve productivity and provide 



WINDFALL ENTERPRISES, INC.. 

located in Barrington at 202 James 
Street, phone (847) 382-7181. 
As the area's leading auihority on of- 
fice interior, the experts at WIND- 
FALL ENTERPRISES, INC. stand 



maximum utilization of valuable floor 
space. They can also provide you with 
office work areas that are bolh func- 
tional and flexible. WINDFALL 
ENTERPRISES, INC. has one of the 
area's largest and most professionally 



ready lo bring new liTc to your place of displayed selections of desks, chairs. 
business with efficient, "durahle and filing cabinets, work stations or cu- 
siylish used, new and recycled office biclcs. conference tables and misccl- 
furniture. Their designers can help you laneous equipment and supplies lo out- 
keep up vviih the demands of ihc rap- fit any office, large or small. They have 



available lo them the finest names in 
used, new and recycled office furniture, 
produced by the nation's premier 
manufacturers. 

Whether you need an open office sys- 
tem or the finest in office furniture, let 
the professionals at WINDFALL EN- 
TERPRISES, INC. bring it all lo- 
gclher for you. 

The Writers of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide rccom- % 
mend WINDFALL ENTERPRISES, 
INC. for all your office needs! 



villi the demands of ihc rap- fit nnv ofhec, large or small. I hey have ^^^^ 

GLOBAL RUBEN'S TEAM REALTY, INC.S 

Ruben Acevedo, Owner 



Total service in real csiute has won the 
professionals at GLOBAL RUBEN'S 
TEAM REALTY, INC. the respect of 
homeowners, business people and 
municipal officials Ihroughout Ihc area. 
Located in Carpcntersville at 119 
North Kennedy Drive, Route 25, 
phone 836-6300 or 836-8300 or page 
Ruben at (708) 626-9941, their mll- 
scrvice staff of realtors doesn't deal 
merely in For-Sale signs — the deal ih 
people. They are interesied in repre- 
senting you in ihe best possible man- 
ner to the limit of their professional 



abilities. GLOBAL RUBEN'S 
TEAM REALTY, INC. servicesull of 
the communities ihroughout Lake, 
Mcllenry, Cook, DuPagc and Kane 
Counties. 

The experts al GLOBAL RUBEN'S 
TEAM REALTY, INC. arc altogether 
familiar with all details indispensable 
to ihe real estate business. They have 
developed an acute sense of values 
through llveir experience in buying and 
selling real estate properties. Both resi- 
dential and commercial properties are 
listed, and they also have a good se- 



orroniuwit 

lection of investment properties. 
Whatever transaction you seek, list 
with this outstanding agency. Fxpcri- 
ence. integrity and total service are all 
in your corner when you list wilh ihc 
■"pcoplc-orienled" professionals al 
GLOBAL RUBEN'S TEAM RE- 
ALTY, INC. They will be glad to ex- 
pertly counsel you for all your real es- 
tate needs. 

The Writers of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide recom- 
mend this outstanding firm to all our 
readers. 



■',: 



C10 / Lakeland Newspa- 



BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE 



March 13, 1998 



KIRBY DISTRIBUTING CO. 

Nick & Sandie Kondos, Owners 



When you decide to invest your hard 
earned money in a new vacuum cleaner, 
be sure to call or visit KIRBY DIS- 
TRIBUTING CO., located at 6217 
Factory Road in Crystal Lake, phone 
(815) 455-8282. They arc the area's 
factory authorized dealer for sales and 
service of genuine Kirby products. 
They offer a lifetime rebuilding war- 
ranty which is built on a combination 
of 80 years of research, development, 
consumer satisfaction, and honesty. 
A Kirby is a very unique appliance. It 
converts from one type of cleaner to 
another in a matter of seconds, han- 
dling everything from shampooing your 
carpet to unclogging your drain. Kirby 
buffs, cleans and vacuums tile, as well 



as vacuums and shampoos carpets. As 
a complete cleaning system, it offers 
. many added features such as the mi- 
cron magic filtration system, the bag 
system is 99.9% dust free which fil- 
ters down to .3 microns and is3,000ths 
the size of a piece of human hair. Kirby 
also features the miracle waxcr, which 
allows you to clean and polish your 
hardwood floors with a slight push. 
KIRBY DISTRIBUTING CO. also 
features attachments that will make 
your Kirby the most useful appliance 



cabinets. It connects to your hose and 
sucks the dust into the vacuum so there 
isn't excess dust flying around. 
KIRBY DISTRIBUTING CO. will 
be glad to come to your home and pro- 
vide you with a no-obligation, enter- 
taining and educational presentation. 
Experience first hand, through their 
free carpet shampoo, the benefits a 
Kirby can oficryour family. Call today 
at (815) 455-8282 for more informa- 
tion or an appointment. 
The Editors of this 1998 Business 



Money available to assist 
low-income homebuyers 



in your home, as well as a full line of Review & Reference Guide are hon- 

supplies including shampoo, stain re- orcd to be able to recommend this 

movers, bags and belts. Asanoplional fine community leader to all area 

piece they carry the lurbo sandcr which residents, 
allows you to sand anything, such as 



POWER CONCRETE LIFTING & LEVELING 



One of the most vital parts of any struc- 
ture, whether it is a garage or a giant 
warehouse, is something hidden from 
sight — the foundation. The unfortu- 
nate situation is that the foundation 
sometimes becomes sunk-in and needs 
leveling. 

This type of form work must be done 
to exacting standards, or the entire 
structure will be flawed. Tor the fin- 
est in power lifting and leveling of con- 
crete work of all types, contact the con- 
crete lifting experts at POWER CON- 
CRETE LIFTING & LEVELING, 



Don Powers, Owner 

located in Waukegan at 36670 North 
Adelphi Avenue, phone 625-8000. 
They specialize in all phases of the 
power lilling and leveling of concrete 
construction, including stoops, patios, 
driveways, sidewalks, steps and curbs. 
You can always depend on the reliabil- 
ity of this firm, for they have built an 
envied reputation for themselves 
throughout the entire area. 
At POWER CONCRETE LIFTING 
& LEVELING, the same prompt, 
courteous service is given lo large and 
small jobs alike. These professionals 



always give personal attention to ev- 
er)' contract and will help work out all 
the necessary plans with estimates. 
Concrete is a solid investment, and to 
protect and maintain your investment, 
call the concrete lifting specialists at 
POWER CONCRETE LIFTING & 
LEVELING. 

The Writers of (his 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide recom- 
mend this excellent concrete lifting 
and leveling firm to all our readers. 



THE SALVATION ARMY THRIFT STORE 



When was the last lime you looked into 
your closet and said "I have nothing to 
wear!" Clothing costs in Ihe last few 
years have skyrocketed and made styl- 
ish clothing financially unalTordablc for 
many people. This year you. loo, can 
"dress to impress 1 ." Just slop by THE 
SALVATION ARMY THRIFT 
STORE, the area's leading thrift shop. 
They are located in Gurnec at 3521 
Grand Avenue, phone 336-8857, and 
in Wnukcgan al 140 South Sheridan 
Road, phone 623-6170. 
Smart shoppers will love their nexl-lo- 
neiv selection of men's, women's and 



children's clothing and accessories. 
They offer a wide variety of fashion- 
able clothing, all at prices (hot will 
make your pockelbook smile. Do you 
have an upcoming event on your cal- 
endar? Well, before you go out and 
spend a fortune on new clolhing, slop 
bv THE SALVATION ARMY 
THRIFT STORE. Browse through 
their outstanding selection of clothing, 
appliances, bedding, furniture, books 
and records. There is something for 
everyone in the entire family. 
Stylish clolhing, unbelievable prices, 
top quality and friendly service make 



THE SALVATION ARMY THRIFT 
STORE the number one choice for the 
smart discerning shopper. Stop in soon 
and see for yourself. Donations arc 
always accepted and appreciated, 
Please call 662-7730 for free pick-up 
on clothing, furniture or other items. 
The Writers or this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide would 
like to commend THE SALVATION 
ARMY THRIFT STORE for their 
continuing help and community ser- 
vice to all of the residents through- 
out the county. 



Grayslake-area residents earning 
less than 60 percent of the city's me- 
dian income may be eligible for a fi- 
nancial boost toward their dream of 
homeownership. 

The Norwest Homeownership 
Assistance Program (NHAPJ— which 
provides up to $2,000, or 5 percent of 
the total mortgage to assist eligible 
low- and very low-income homebuy- 
ers obtain closing costs or down pay- 
ment funds toward a home mort- 
gage—received a $500,000 grant from 
the Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) 
of Dcs Moines to support its nation- 
wide initiatives. 

"This program allows many of 
the nation's low-income borrowers 
lo achieve the American dream of 
homeownership," said Tim 
Cranston, vice president regional 
manager for the Grayslake area of 
Norwesl Mortgage. "The nationwide 
demand for the NHAP program ex- 
emplifies the growing need for af- 
fordable housing solutions." 

Under NHAP guidelines, if a bor- 
rower's income is between 50 and 60 
percent of the area median income, 
Norwest Mortgage will match $2 for 
every $1 the borrower contributes, up 
lo a maximum of $2,000. If the bor- 
rower's income is less than orequal to 
50 percent of the area median in- 
come, he/she is eligible for a $2,000 
contribution toward closing costs or 
as a down payment. A borrower's 
contributions may come from per- 
sonal funds, grants or gifts. 

Cranston said since die program's 
inception in August of 1995, nearly 
1,000 families have been served 
through this program, totaling more 
than $1.8 million in NHAP contribu- 
tions, and leveraging nearly $58 mil- 



lion in first mortgage financing. With 
the new Federal Home Loan Bank 
grant, Cranston said Norwest expects 
to make nearly 255 additional loans, 
or approximately $14 million in first 
mortgage financing. 

"Norwest Mortgage's commit- 
ment to expanding affordable hous- 
ing opportunities is commendable," 
said Thurman C. "Sam" Connell, 
Home Loan Bank president. "We are 
pleased to continue to play an active 
role in the Norwest Homeownership 
Assistance Program. Programs such 
as this one are vital to the continued 
economic growth of communities." 

NHAP contributions are awarded 
on a first come, first served basis and 
will continue until Federal Home 
Loan Bank grant funds arc exhausted. 
Interested applicants should contact 
their local Norwest Mortgage branch 
for an application. 

Norwest Mortgage, Inc. and Nor- 
west Bank Iowa, N.A., administer the 
NHAP program allocation. 

Based in Des Moines, Iowa, Nor- 
west Mortgage, Inc., is a subsidiary of 
Norwest Corporation. It is die nation's 
leading originator and servicer of res- 
idential mortgages. With more than 
750 stores in all 50 states, Norwest 
Mortgage operates the largest mort- 
gage lending network in the country 
and provides funding for approxi- 
mately one of ever>' 15 homes fi- 
nanced in the United States. 

Editor's note: To receive a copy of 
the appropriate qualifying income lev- 
els for your city please call Jon Fcrchen 
at (515) 221-7372 or e-mail 
jon.ferchcn@iunbMonvest.com and 
identify your state. Please include your 
fax number. 



Smart ways to borrow 

money from yourself 



NEW PERSPECTIVE 

Physical Design Critical To Alzheimer's Care 



NEW PERSPECTIVE, located in the home is the ideal setting for care. 

Wheeling at 760 Mcllcnry Road. Safely issues often prevent those with 

phone 465-1 100, is doing its part in ihe Alzheimer's from remaining at home, 

care of people with Alzheimer's Dis- NEW PERSPECTIVE is designed for 

case. A person with dementia requires their residents to enjoy ihe outdoors, 

daily assistance. Symptoms such as joining in group activities al another 



memory loss, nervousness, depression 
and loss of inieresi in previously en- 
joyed activities or places characterize 
the early stages of Alzheimer's Dis- 
ease. 

Many individuals and families turn lo 
long-term institutional care; however, 



cottage or caring lor a garden. Each 
collage has only 16 residents, which 
encourages social interaction and 
makes il easier for residents lo orient 
themselves. Residents help maintain 
their homes by setting the table, bak- 
ing cookies, folding laundry and par- 



ticipating in other household tasks. 
NEW PERSPECTIVE was designed 
to provide comfort, safely and a home- 
like atmosphere. Your inspection of 
their fine facility is invited at any time. 
Call today for a lour or more informa- 
tion on their services. 
The Editors of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide recom- 
mend NEW PERSPECTIVE to all 
our readers. 



DECK THE WALLS 



Whether you arc a serious collector or 
just browsing, you're sure lo find some- 
thing of interest at DECK THE 
WALLS, located in Vernon Hills at 
704 Hawthorne Shopping Center, on 
the second level, near Marshall Fields, 
phone 549-6070. The collection of fine 
traditional and contemporary art fea- 
tured here includes the work of popu- 
lar local artists, as well as those of na- 
tional and international renown, and 
arc arranged in a truly complementary 
fashion. 
A friendly and knowledgeable staff will 



Bob Marcus, Owner 

show you canvas artwork, watercolors, 
limited and open edition prints, featur- 
ing works of renowned artists such as 
Peterson and Ktiwcule. Discover the 
diversity of artwork at DECK THE 
WALLS. In their informal atmo- 
sphere, the collector and ihe art apprc- 
ciator will enjoy the extensive selec- 
tion on display that includes sports art, 
photomosaics, lighted pictures and ani- 
mated cartoon cells. From old mas- 
ters to contemporary art. you will be 
more than pleased with their diversi- 
fied collection. With their own shop 



on the premises. DECK THE WALLS 
are special isls in custom picture fram- 
ing, both conventional and conserva- 
tion. 

The Writers of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide recom- 
mend DECK THE WALLS as the 
gallery you won't want to miss, 
whether you arc just beginning your 
collection or arc seeking to enrich 
one. Service, reliability and integ- 
rity arc a tradition at this wcll-re- 
spected gallery. 



DIGITAL DIRECT 

SATELLITE-HOME THEATER SYSTEMS 



With cable prices soaring, people in 
this area are looking toward Satellite 
TV for more quality, more channels and 
less cost. They want to deal with a 
reputable firm that is knowledgeable 
on all the systems, choices available 
and installations. This is why people 
in this area are doing business with 
DIGITAL DIRECT, for guaranteed 
sales and service after the sale. 



At DIGITAL DIRECT, Ihcy will 
guide you into a system that will fil 
your viewing needs and budget. With 
systems starting much lower than you 
would expect, DIGITAL DIRECT 
slands behind their products and guar- 
antees their systems with a first-class 
installation and service department. 
Anyone in Ihe market for a Satellite 
System should contact DIGITAL DI- 



RECT at 775 Main Street, Antioch, 
800-700-9225 for more information or 
lo schedule a professional installation 
for DirectTV or DISH Network. 
The Editors of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide suggest 
that you contact DIGITAL DIRECT 
today. 



'Hie best place to look for a little fi- 
nancial help might be in the mirror. 
Quite often, your own resources can 
provide the money you need to see 
you through a cash crunch, points out 
the Illinois CPA Society. Since loans 
against your resources are secured by 
your assets, this type of borrowing 
arrangement tends to be inexpensive 
and hassle free. 

The loan of choice 
for homeowners 

For most homeowners, a home 
equity loan or line of credit is likely to 
be the cheapest source of credit. With 
a home equity credit line, you draw 
against your approved line of credit by 
writing a check. You pay interest only 
when you access your credit line gen- 
erally at an adjustable rale that is in- 
dexed to prime. A home equity loan 
lets you borrow a predetermined 
amount of money at a fixed rate and 
requires that you pay back the loan in 
installments over a specific term. The 
amount you can borrow is based on 
the market value of your home, less 
what you still owoon your first mort- 
gage. 

Another selling point in favor of 
home equity borrowing is that inter- 
est on up to $1 00,000 of a home equi : 
ty loan is tax deductible. But you put 
your home at risk. If you default on 
your loan, you could lose your home. 

Retirement funds 
to the rescue 

Most employers allowyou lo bor- 
row half the money In your 401 (K) re- 
tirement plan, up to $50,000. Unlike 
hardship withdrawals which require 
that you demonstrate serious finan- 
cial need, you can generally borrow 
against your 401 (k) with no questions 
asked. Because the loan is secured by 
your retirement funds, the interest 
inte is almost always lower than you'd 
pay elsewhere. You typically have five 
years to repay the loan (longer if 
you're using the money lo buy a 
home) and , in most cases, the pay- 
ments are deducted from your pay- 



check. Since ihe interest you pay goes 
back into your account, you are es- 
sentially paying yourself interest. 

Be aware that if you should leave 
your job, the balance you owe on 
your loan hecomes due immediately, 
If you don't repay it, the loan is treat- 
ed as a withdrawal, which 'means 
you'll have to pay taxes on the out- 
standing balance and a ten percent 
penalty if you're under age 59 1 12. 

Life Insurance as a backup 

Borrowing against the cash value 
of your whole life and certain other 
cash-value types of life insurance can 
provide easy access to money at rates 
that are lower than most other forms 
of debl-perhaps as low as 5 or 6 per- 
cent on some older policies. But there 
are drawbacks to borrowing against 
your policy. First, if there is an out- 
standing balanceat your dcalh, that 
amount is deducted from the policy's 
face value and your heirs receive less 
than you intended when you pur- 
chased the policy. Second, the inter- 
est rate you would normally cam on 
the cash value is reduced on the por- 
tion that Is used as loan collateral. In 
effect, that loss of interest increases 
the cost of your loan. 

Margin loans for 
savvy investors 

If you're cash poor, but have a siz- 
able investment portfolio, a margin 
loan is another way you can borrow 
from yourseir. Using your securities as 

collateral, you can typically borrow up 
to 50 percent of the current market val- 
ue of your slocks and up to 90 percent 
of Treasury holdings. Although margin 
loans arc most often used to buy in- 
vestments, the proceeds can be used 
for any purpose. The advantage of bor- 
rowing against your stocks is the low 
interest rate charged by most broker- 
age linns. Another benefit is that you 
can repay margin loans a quickly or as 
slowly as you like. (Note thai, in gener- 
al, interest is not tax deductible when 
margin loans are used for purposes 
other than purchasing investments.) 



March 13, 1998 



BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C1 1 



Letters welcome 

Letters to the editor are welcome.They should be on topics of general interest, . 
approximately 250 words or less. All letters must be signed, and contain a home 
address and telephone riumber.The e'ditdr reserves the right to condense all letters. 

Send fetters to: Lakeland Newspapers, Attn: Letters to the Editor 
30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 



< 



li'YoqArelhvitecitol 

at the SDA Christian School I 
of Lake County j 

36448 N. Fuller Rd. • Gurnee ', 

Thurs, March 19, 1998 
. 8:30am to 11:30am 

W£OFFCR: 

•Hqhtjs-Oh (jtfo^ln) -Bible BqsecJ Cqtricqlqtn 

•Low Stqjetrt-Teqdi R^tio 

•Before + After School Avqil^ble 

Please Call 623-7773 

JiQSitl 
FAIR HAVEN PHARMACY 

Ronald J. Farland, RPh 




FAIR HAVEN PHARMACY, located 
in Mundelein at 60S East IlawJev 
Street, phone (847) 566-5800, is the 
area's full-service pharmacy. Ronald 
Farland, the licensed pharmacist, is a 
member of the faculty of the Univer- 
sity of Illinois Collegcof Pharmacy and 
is available to answer questions on pre- 
scriptions or other products they offer. 
Since service is the most important fac- 
tor In the success of a local pharmacy, 
the professionals' at FAIR HAVEN- 
PHARMACY always put service first. 
They participate in most major pre- 
scription programs, offer senior citizens 
discounts, and keep accurate comput- 
erized patient drug profiles and tax 
records on file for your safety and con- 
venience. They arc also affiliated with 
three hospices in the area. Prompt pre- 
scription service, over-the-counter 
medications, diabetic and ostomy sup- 




Own your own 
Sears store 

Forget the rest..own the best! 

Sears Dealer Stores-one of America's fastest growing 

retail chains with more then 450 stores nationwide- 

is now looking for an exceptional individual to 

own and operate a new store in 

ANTIOCH, IL 

• America's top brand names in 
appliances, electronics, hardware and 

lawn & garden equipment 

• Top-notch professional training 

• Extensive market and advertising support 
• Outstanding income potential 



For additional information 
interested parties should call toll free 
1-888-259-2616, EXT 444 

Interviews will be held in 
the near future 




"T/ie store you kiwv: 
is tiuv: close to home" 



plies, vitamins, and the durable hospi- 
tal equipment they offer arc sure to 
satisfy any customer's needs. FAIR 
HAVEN PHARMACY keeps in stock 
a complete line of hospital beds, canes, 
walkers, crutches, bedside commodes, 
wheel chairs and miscellaneous equip- 
ment They provide a new service of 
fitting, mastectomy forms. They also 
. have free delivery and direct billing for 
Medicare and for private insurance.. 
Add this to their Tost and friendly pre- 
scription service, and you come up with 
a top quality pharmacy. 
If you're new in the area, visit FAIR 
HAVEN PHARMACY and discover 
why they are the area's number one 
choice. 

The Writers of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide 
unhesitatingly recommend this fine 
pharmacy to all of our readers. 



FINANCIAL FOCUS 



Find a good broker who works 
for a good broker/dealer 



Investors often ask which is more 
important: finding a good broker or 
finding a good broker-dealer. 

There's no reason you can't have 
both. In fact, choosing one without 
regard for the other wouldn't be very 
smart. 

The broker-dealer, or investment 
firm/executes your transactions, re- 
ceives money, holds securities, issues 
statements and much more. This is 
the "back office." You never see most 
of the people who carry out this 
work. 

They are the silent "partners" 
who keep things going. The better 
they perform their work, the less you 



have to worry about. A good broker- 
dealer is an important part of your fi- 
nancial team. 

Your broker/however, is the per- 
son with whom you communicate! 
Almost all your dealings are with 
your broker. This is the person who 
helps you define goals, select invest- 
ments and make changes when ap- 
propriate. Ideally, your broker is as 
close to you as your physician or at- 
torney. 

There are at least three things 
you should expect from your bro- 
ken 

1; Intelligence. Investing is not 
for dummies, no matter what the 



best-selling books say. Investment 
products are complicated. Putting 
them together in a successful finanr 
cial strategy demands more than ba- 
sic knowledge. 

2. Action. Investing is not a wait- 
and-see game. Research must be 
done, rational decisions must be 
made, and then action should be tak- 
en. It's the responsibility of a good 
broker to help you make those deci- 
sions and act prudently. 

3. Honesty. If your broker isn't 
honest, it doesn't matter if he's intel- 
ligent or action-oriented. If you sus- 
pect dishonesty, run — don't walk- 
to the nearest exit. 



BUSINESS REVIEW 

COUNTY NEWS 

is solely responsible for sales, contents and collection of the Review Section 



ALL YOU CAN INK 



When a service for which you cannot 
go window shopping is needed, such 
as professional tattooing, it then be- 
comes more important than ever to 
know. the reputation of the firm with 
which you are going to do business. 
ALL YOU CAN INK, located at 27 
West Milwaukee in Jamesville, phone 
(888) 741-1197, is a shop where you 
can do business with confidence and 
assurance of receiving total satisfac- 
tion. All Artists are APT Registered. 
At ALL YOU CAN INK, all work is 



done in comfortable, sterile conditions, 
and this exceptional studio provides the 
area's very best body art. ALL YOU 
CAN INK specializes in custom free 
hand tattooing for that one of a kind 
tattoo, or choose from over J 00.000 
designs. 

They know the business perfectly and 
insist that each job be to your satisfac- 
tion. They are competent, well trained, 
and have the desire to please their cus- 
tomers. 
ALL YOU CAN INK is known for 



excellent service and fair prices. 
Much of their popularity is due to 
the careful attention paid to every 
detail, so whether it's your first tat- 
too, an addition to your collection, 
or repair of an old and unsightly tat- 
too, the Writers of this 1998 Busi- 
ness Review & Reference Guide, 
suggest that you contact ALL YOU 
CAN INK first. We arc sure you will 
be pleased with the art work they can 
do for you. 



INC. 



500 Park Place, Ste. 107 in Lake Villa, phone (847) 265-2825 



"Planning to' build or remodel this 
spring...you need to visit INTERNA- 
TIONAL FLOOR COVERING 
INC., located at 500 Park Place, Ste. 
107 in Lake Villa, phone (847) 265- 
2825. Here, you'll find floor coverings 
of all types for every room in your home 
or commercial building. 
INTERNATIONAL FLOOR COV- 
ERING INC. displays beautiful, natu- 
ral hardwood flooring in plank, strip 
or parquet. Long wearing, easy-care, 
no-wax vinyl flooring is also on dis- 



play in beautiful colors and patterns. 
The salespeople at INTERNA- 
TIONAL FLOOR COVERING 
INC. can show you a variety of carpet- 
ing from luxurious, deep pile carpet for 
your home to wear resistant carpet for 
commercial applications. 
INTERNATIONAL FLOOR COV- 
ERING INC. features quality floor 
coverings from well-known manufac- 
turers. The salespeople here can in- 
form you about the qualities, advan- 
tages and proper care required, and 



offer expert installation. For selection, 
service and quality products.. .stop in 
soon and browse through the extensive 
showroom of INTERNATIONAL 
FLOOR COVERING INC. 
In Compiling this 1998 Business 
Review and Reference Guide, ,we;- 
the Editors, feel that we can highly - 
recommend INTERNATIONAL 
FLOOR COVERING INC. to every- 
one. 



ANTHONY PONTIAC-GMC-BUICK 

Awarded #1 Customer Satisfaction in 1997 for Pontiac in the Chicago Zone 



With so many of the new models being 
similar in features and price, how does 
the prospective new car buyer know 
which automobile is best for him? 
Well, as the saying goes, "If you don't 
know cars.. .know the people you buy 
from." In Waukegan, consumers arc 
very fortunate to have a dealer like 
ANTHONY PONTIAC-GMC- 
BUICK. Located at 2727 Belvidere 
Road, Route 120, phone 244-1010, 
this well-known firm is an authorized 
representative for famous 
Pontiac-Buick cars and GMC trucks. 
Besides offering a full line of quality 
products, this community-minded deal- 
ership bases its success on a simple fact 
of good business. Keep the Customer 
Satisfied. 



The business of customer satisfaction 
begins in the showroom and continues 
right on through their complete service 
department where skilled technicians 
and the latest diagnostic test equipment 
assure you that your new car or truck 
will "keep you satisfied" for many 
years to come. 

The Writers of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide recom- 
mend you stop by ANTHONY 
PONTIAC-GMC-BUICK show- 
room very soon. We know you'll be 
more than satisfied. 
Become involved in the PHOTO 
AND FINGERPRINT ID PRO- 
GRAM. Mark Klass, founder of the 
KLASS FOUNDA TION FOR CHIL- 
DREN, and nationally recognized 



advocate for protecting children 
against violence, will be speaking at 
a Town Hall Meeting to be held at 
ANTHONY PONTIAC-GMC- 
BUICK, Monday, March 16 at 
7:30pm. PHOTO AND FINGER- 
PRINT ID PROGRAM is a new pro- 
gram that uses no ink or film. IT'S 
FREE, and the information is for 
your records only, it will not be dis- 
tributed to anyone. We encourage 
you to bring your children and the 
entire neighborhood for this program 
from 10:00am to 7:00pm, March 16. 
FOR MORE INFORM A TION CON- 
TACT MICHAEL WASHKOAT847- 

244-1010. 



BC DOG TRAINING, GROOMING & PET SUPPLIES 

Cathie & Bea Sabin, Owners 



The number one cause ofdeath for dogs housebreaking for both puppies and 

in the U.S. is not parvo, heartworm or adult dogs, on- and off-leash obedience 

rabies. It is housebreaking and obedi- training, behavior problems, and 

encc problems. A puppy is adorable; classes that arc available for all ages 

but when a hectic lifestyle prevents the of dogs. 

owner from spending enough time on BC DOG TRAINING, GROOM- 
training. the result is often a trip to the ING & PET SUPPLIES wants the 
local animal shelter, where unadopted public to understand that all animals 
dogs arc regularly put to sleep. Many have unique personalities. Virtually 
owners don't realize that they can be- any dog will accept training that's pro- 
gin training at 10 weeks of age. BC vided with individualized, loving at- 
DOG TRAINING, GROOMING & tention. They have experience in ca- 
PET SUPPLIES puppy and beginner nine psychology and behavioral stud- 
classes offer techniques to teach your ics. Programs arc available to help 
dog how to behave at home. Located your dog learn such things as obedi- 
in Mundelein at 872 Tower Road, ence, agility, flyball and confirmation, 
phone 566-1960, their services include Puppy and adult daycare is available 



Monday through Friday from 6:00am 
to 6:00pm. 

To receive full benefits of dog owner- 
ship, good training is essential. BC 
DOG TRAINING, GROOMING & 
PET SUPPLIES is an Eagle Pack 
brand dog food distributor. They carry 
a complete line of retail supplies and 
accessories for your pet. Stop by soon, 
they are more than happy to answer 
your questions regarding their services 
and rates. 

The Writers of this 1998 Business 
Review & Reference Guide recom- 
mend BC DOG TRAINING, 
GROOMING & PET SUPPLIES 
for all your pet needs. 



C 1.2/ Lakeland Newspapers 




March 13, 1998 




Pre-planning. It's no wonder. 

No one knows what your wishes arc unless you make them known. That's true 

in life and in death. By pre-planning jour funeral arrangements, you make a 

most difficult lime a little easier for jour loved ones. You relieve them of the 

burden of guessing what jou wanted, and the lingering doubts that follow. 

Take a few moments and call us or return this coupon. We can help mack the 
planning so easy you tray wonder why jou didn't do it sooner. 



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□ I wxik) lilr free information ahout prc-phninf; 



Name 



mmtl 



AJdrctt 



K.K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home Ltd. P[y . 



I. 1 N. I'iUjUc l3l* Raid, (hi Ijlr. Hlinnii 

I HlinlWnl it fUe. 12. 

1/7 (Uixl t«mh nl ( .1 jml fttt 

"The Chapel on the Lalx" 



(815)385-1001 (847)587-2100 



SUlc . 



Zip- 




Phone. 



NOCOSlOKOmiGAllON 



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DEATH NOTICES 



ANDERSON 

David A. Anderson, oge 72 oflake Zurich 
Arr: Ahlgrirn and Sons Funeral Home, Lake 
Zurich 

scuum 

Joyce H. Schultz (nee Anderson), age 61 of 

Wauconda 

Arr: Kisselburg-Wauconda Funeral Home, 

Wauconda 

110131 

Hobert FJmer Holm Jr, age 50, of Round lake 
Xrr. Justen's Round take Funeral Home 

WILSON 

Carol C. Wilson, age 101 , of Ubcrtyville 
Arr. Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, 
Ubertwille 



KUNRE 

Linda L. Kunke, age 52 of Ubcrtyville 

Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, 

Libertyvillc 

PARDEE 

Barbara Pardee, age 83 of Mundelein 

Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, 

Libertyvillc 

RICE 

Uoyd R. Rice, age 66 of Round lake Park 

Arr: George R, Justen & Son Funeral Home, 

McHcnry 

KOC1NSK1 

Rose D. Kocinski, age 91, of Ingleside 

Arr Marsh Funeral Home of Gurnee 

PHILLIPS 

Bennie Lee Phillips, age 66 of Gurnee 
Arr: Salata Gurnee Funeral Home, Gurnee 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Funeral 



Nick E. Grimaldi -*."<. 

Age 75 of Round Dike Beach, died Saturday, March B, 
1990 at Highland Park Memorial Hospital in Highland Park. 
He was horn on June 2, 1922 in Chicago to Frank and Mary 
(nee Fosco) Grimoldi. He was n resident of Round Lake 
Beach since 1954, formerly of Chicago. He was the owner and 
proprietor of Grimaldi Basement Waterproofing and Home 
Improvement Co. in Round Lake Beach Tor 35 years before 
retiring. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. 

He is survived by his wife, Helen Kcmety Grimaldi; two 
sons; Rodney (Roma) Grimaldi of Round Like, Tom Grimaldi 
of Round lake Beach; one daughter, Helcne Grimaldi of 
Round Dike Beach! He was the grandfather of three; great 
grandfather of two; brother of Hli (Ruthic) Grimaldi, Joe 
(Cora) Grimaldi, Danny (Mary) Grimaldi, and Nancy Isola. 
He is preceded iri death by his parents. 

Visitation was at Juslen's Round Lake Funeral Home, 
Round Lake. 

Funeral services were held at the funeral home with Rev. 
Mike Williams, Ittstor of Gil vary Chapel of Lake Villa, officiating. 

Interment was at Avon Centre Cemetery, Graysloke. 

In lieu of flowers, donations to the charity of choice, 
would be appreciated, 

Alexandra Libera 

Age 7fl of Paddock Lake, Wis., passed away Monday, 
March 3, 1998 at Washington Manor, Kenosha, Wis., She was 
born July 10, 1919 in Poland the daughter of the late Xnvicr 
and Paulina (Czamecki) Korowicki. She came to the U.S. in 
1950 and had lived in Chicago and Michigan before moving 
to Paddock Lake in 1 987. She married Cyprian Libera in June 
of 1935 in Poland and he preceded her in death in 1994. 

Survivors include her daughter, Helen (Edward) 
Szpajcher of Antioch; her son Steve (Theresa) Ubera of 
Roselle; three grandchildren, Janet (Paul) Morton, Steve 
Libera and Linda (David) Bargiel and two great grandchil- 
dren, Jason and Daniel Morton. Beside her husband she is 
preceded in death by two sisters, Veronica and Leokadia. 

Funeral Services widi Mass of Christian Burial was held 
at St. Peter Church, Antioch. 

Friends called at the Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Private interment was held at Green Ridge Cemetery, 
Kenosha, Wis. 



STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, 1L 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847) 395-4000 

K.K, HAMSHCR FUNERAL HOME, LTD. 

12 N. Pistakec Lake Rd. t Fox Uke, [L 

(847)587-2100 

Kenneth K. Hamsher, Debra Hamshcr* Glen, Directors 

R1NGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, II. 

(847)356-2146 

Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL, LTD. 
AND CREMATORIUM 

410 E. Belvidere Grayslake, IL 

(847)223-8122 

David G. Strang and Richard A Gaddis, Director 

JUS TENS ROUND LAKE FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Court (Rosedale at Cedar Lake Road) 

(847) 546-3300 

Nancy Justen, Jeffrey Jordan, Directors 

Additional Locations in McHenry and Wonder Lake 



John Shay 

Age 82 of Highland lake passed away in Antioch on 
Monday, March 2, 1998. He was bom, Dec 25, 1915 in 
Chicago, the son of William (Jcon) Shay. A permanent 
Grayslake resident since 1952 and summer resident since 
1938. Member of the Grayslake Uons Club since the early 
1950s, the Avon Players for the past 25 years, Avon Grade 
School Board and the Grayslake Library Board for the past 25 
years, and member of die Highland Park Property Owners 
Assn. Mr. Shny retired in March of 1 997'nftcr 50 years ofded- - 
icated service with the Dover Industrial Chrome Co. of 
Chicago. 

He leaves his wife, Fanny (nee Kulp); daughters, Frances 
(George) Smith of Grayslake and Susanne Shay of Cincinnati, 
Ohio; his grandchildren, Margot Krause, Steven Imsandc, 
and Holly Kleitsch; great grandchildren, Dave, Joan, Keltic, 
Ricky, and Mclyssa. 

Funeral services were held at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd. Grayslake, with the Pastor Paul 
Galchutt of the Shepherd of die lakes Lutheran Church of 
Grayslake, officiating. 

Interment was privately held. 

Memorials may be given to the Grayslake Lions Club 
HO, Box 201 Grayslake, IL 60030 or to the Illinois Eye Bank, 
800 S.Wells St., Suite 195, Chicago, !L 60607-4529. 

Helen Marie Mandeville 

Age 92, a longtime resident of Clearwater, Fla., died 
Tuesday, March 3, 1998 at die Aldcn Terrace Nursing Home 
in McHenry. She was bom on Jan. 9, 1906 in Chicago and had 
been a housewife in her home, and had recently moved to 
Illinois to be closer to her family here. 

Survivors include; her daughter, Lorraine Hcilingoetter 
of Spring Grove; two grand daughters, Barbara (David) Bays 
of Johnsburg, and Linda (Joseph) Bastuga of Antioch; her 
great grandchildren, Jeffrey and Gregory Bays, both of 
johnsburg and Rebecca Bastuga or Anitoch; two nieces, 
Frances (Ralph) Ellerth or Mount Prospect and Jean 
(Kenneth) Evridge of Chicago. She is preceded in death by 
her parents, her late husband, Orrin Mandeville; her brother, 
John W. Waksmulski; her sister, Anna Garile, and by a son-in- 
law, Joseph Hcilingoetter. 

Cemetery commital services were conducted at the St. 
Adalberts Cemetery in Niles. 

Arrangements were completed by the K. K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox lake (The Chapel on the lake) 

Katherine Ochs 

Age 05 of Antioch, passed away Thursday, March 5, 1998 
at Provena St. Theresa Medical Center, Waukcgan. She was 
born Jan. 19, 1933 in Krndjii, Yugoslavia the daughter of the 
late Adam and Magdnlena (Hichler) Menzer. She came lo the 
XJJ5. in 1951 living in Washington, moving to Chicago in 1953 
and lake Villa in 1 972 and Antioch in 1976. She was a member 
of Si. Peter Church, die German American Club and with her 
husband had formerly owned and operated the Golden Ochs 
Restaurant in Antioch. In 1997 she retired as a cook for Baxter 
laboratory in Bound I*ilce. Beside cooking, she enjoyed needle 
work, reading and l>eing with her beloved family. On July 27, 
1957, i»he married Hermann Ochs in Chicago 

Survivors include her husband Hermann, one son Gary 
(Tammy) Ochs of Piano, Tex.; two daughters, Charlotte 
(Donald) Gustafson of Bristol, Wis. and Susan (Mark) Stewart 
or Antioch one brother, Michael (Frances) Menzer of Bartlett; 
two sisters, Gisela (Florian) Rettig of New Buffalo, Mich, and 
I lildy (tarry) Andriunas of Littleton, Colo. She was the grand- 
modier of Adam and Krica. 

Funeral Services with Mass of Christian Burial were held 
at St. Peter Church, Antioch. 

Interment was held at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 
Friends called at die Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 
Those desiring, may make contributions, in her memo- 
ry, to the charity of your choice. 



Ilermina J. Leijdeklters 

Age 83 of Undenhurst, passed away on Saturday, March 
7, 1998 at Kenosha Care Center, Kenosha, Wis. She was bom 
Oct. 25, 1914 In Amsterdam, Holland, the daughter of the late 
Jacobus and Elizabeth (Libert) Belt. Herrriina was a member 
of Prince of Peach Church, Lake Villa and was a former mem- 
ber of the church choir. On Feb. 6, 1940, she married Gerrit 
Leijdekkers in Amsterdam and he preceded her in deatli on 
Jan. 19, 1990. 

Survivors include her two daughters, Francina (Stuart) 
Hastings of Ingleside and Elizabeth Gcrritsen of Undenhurst; 
one sister Sjaan Rtpekema of Holland, She was the grand' 
modtcr of five and great grandmoihcr of six. She Is also pre- 
ceded in dead) by two sisters, Ann and Corric. 

Funeral services with Mass of Christian Burial were held 
at Prince of Peace Church, Lake Villa. 

Interment was at Highland Memorial Park Cemetery, 
Libertyvillc. 

Friends called at the Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Adrian *Ace* J. Mueller 

Age 57 of Antioch, passed away Sunday, March 8, 1998 at 
his home. He was born Oct. 1 1 , 1940 in Beaver Dam, Wis., the 
son of die late Alvin and RuUi (Sturm) Mueller. He received 
his undergraduate degree in education at Stout State College 
at Menomonic, Wis. and his Masters of Education in 
Vocational Administration from the University of Illinois at 
Champaign-Urbana. 'Ace* came to Antioch in 1963 where he 
became the Vocational Administrator at Antioch Community 
High until his retirement. He had coached cross country and 
track during his career also. For many years he has operated 
A. Mueller and Associates Architectural Firm in Antioch. Ace' 
was a member of St. Stephen Lutheran Church of Antioch, 
the Antioch Lions Club, the IRTA and AVA and enjoyed 
Boating and Skiing and was an avid jogger. On March 3, 19G2, 
he married Eunice Schliewe in Menomonie, Wis. 

Survivors include his wife, Eunice, his son, Steven of 
Wheaton, and his daughter, Beth (Dan) Mehlhorn of 
Pittsburgh, Pcnn.; one brother, Marvin (Carol) of Fox lake 
and his grand daughter Alyssa. 

Funeral services were held at St. Stephen Lutheran 
Church of Antioch. 

Interment was at Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. 

Friends called at the Strang Funeral Home of Antioch. 

Those desiring may make contributions to (he Antioch 
Rescue Squad or St. Stephen Lutheran Church, in his 
memory. 

Dr. Sergio L Fuentes 

Age 74 of Uke Forest, passed away Friday, March 6, 1998 
at die Lake Forest Hospital. He was born Jan. 13, 1924 In 
Cuba, and came to the United States In 1950. He was united 
in marriage to Dr. Dulcc M. Mllnnon on D*?c 20. in* a mid 
they owned and operated 11 medlcid clinic in c;my»i..k., ... 

1955 and practiced ns a family medical and surgical doctor 
until his retirement. He was a member of the Cuban Medical 
Assn., the AMA, the Illinois State Medical Society, and Lake 
County Medical Society. He served on the medical staff of St. 
Thcrese Medical Center Hospital as well as Victory Memorial 
Hospital in Waukegan. He will be long remembered as a 
friendly doctor with a good bedside manner. 

He leaves his wife, Dr. Dulcc M. (Milanes) Lake Forest; 
his daughter, Dulce (Robert) Brandt, Lake Forest ; his two 
sons, Sergio Fuentes, lake forest, and Matthew (Cathy) 
Fuentes, Lincolnshire and his four grandchildren, Eddie, 
Michael, Katie and Jenny, one sister, Zaida Bermudez, Punta 
Gorda, Ma. He is preceded in death by his parents and a 
brother, Carlos. 

Mass of the Resurrection was offered at St. Gilbert 
Catholic Church, Grayslake. 

Interment followed at Ascension Cemetery, Libertyvillc. 

Friends of the family visited at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
. and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 



In loving memory of 

Gail 'Mickey' Wurth 

Husband, dad and grandpa 

April 2,1917- March 15, 1992 

He's missed very much 

but his memories are so dear 

That deep in our heart 

he will always be near. 

Love your family 



Sometimes an old fashioned song 

Jjrinqs us a though/ ' oj you; 

Sometimes a flower as we pass along \ 

Or a sfuj I fiat is azure o/ue; 

(Jr a silver fining in the cfouos } 

When /he sun is peeping through 

In ft r of these things^ mahe us 

thinhoft/ou. 



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March 13, 1998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
BID NOTICE 

District 114 Is soliciting bids for 
the purchase of a used 1 998 transit 
style 78 passenger school, bus. 
Sealed bids will be accepted before 
Monday. March 23, 1098 at 8:50 
AM and will be opened at 9:00 AM. 
Bids must be delivered to the 
Administrative Office located at 
Forest School, 17 North Forest 
Avenue, Fox Lake. Specifications 
may be picked up at the 
Administrative Office, between the 
hours of 8:00 AM and 3:00 PM, dur- 
ing regular school days. The Board 
of Education reserves the right to 
accept or reject any and all bids. 

03988-1650-GEN 
March 13, 1998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
REQUEST FOR BIDS 
VILLAGE OF FOX LAKE 
NORTHWEST REGIONAL 
WATER RECLAMATION FACIU- 
TY 
200 INDUSTRIAL AVE. 
FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS 60020 
The Fox Lake NWRWRF will be 
accepting bids for a 1998 Mini pas- 
senger Van . 

. Sealed bids will be received In 
the office of the Village Clerk, 301 
S. Rt. 59, Fox Lake, Illinois 60020 
until 10:00am. April 3rd 1998. 

Mark sealed envelope "1998 
NWRWRF MINI VAN*. 

Bids will be opened on April 3rd, 
1998 at 10:00am in the council 
Chambers of the Village of Fox 
Lake, 301 S. Rte. 59, Fox Lake, 
Illinois 60020. 

The right Is reserved by the 
Village of Fox Lake to reject any or 
all bids. 

A copy of the -required vehicle 
specifications can be picked up at 
the NWRWRF Administration Bldg. 
200 Industrial Ave., Fox Lake, 

llllnolB 00020. 

0398B-1669-GEN 
March 13, 199B 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Millie's 

Resale 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSI- 
NESS IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR 
TRANSACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 
137 Cedar Ave., Lake Villa, IL 
60046 (847) 356-1390 (Stieef}. 
1061 Victoria St., Antioch, IL6OO02. 
(847) B38-0314. (mailing) 
NAME{S) AND POST OFFICE 
OR RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) 
OF THE PERSON(S) OWNING. 
CONDUCTING OR TRANSACT- 
ING BUSINESS: Janet L. King, 
1061 Victoria St., Antfoch, IL 
60002.(847)838-0314 
STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This is to certify that the under- 
signed intend (s) to conduct the 
above named business from the 
locatlon(s) Indicated and that the 
true or real full name(s) of the per- 
son(s) owning, conducting or trans- 
acting the business is/are correct as 
shown. 

/s/Janet L. King, February 24, 1998 
The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the 
person(s) intending to conduct the 
business this 24th day of February, 
1998. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Jessica M Casarez 

Notary Public 

Received: February 24, 1998 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0398A-1629-LV 

March 13, 1998 

March 20, 1998 



■J ml«... ; 

■B53 pe? ■. . «t-i-U 




PUBLIC NOTICE 

VILLAGE OF ROUND LAKE PARK 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED; APRIL 30, 1997 

GENERAL CORPORATE 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 9,404.06 

REVENUES: PROPERTY TAXES 98,B28,54: SALES TAX 102,862.46: MUNICI- 
PAL UTILITY TAX 173.732.09: VEHICLE LICENSE 19,786.00: TRUCK LICENSE 
6,817.50: BUSINESS UCENSE 13,125.00: LAKE COUNTY ANIMAL LICENSE 
520.00: ANIMAL UCENSE 31.00: FRANCHISE UCENSE - ILL BELL 19,929.52: 
BUILDING PERMITS 44, 465.50: IMPACT FEES 40,000.00: OTHER PERMITS & 
FEES 4,738.24: STATE INCOME TAX 285,976.23: REPLACEMENT TAX 2. 855.09: 
GRANTS 82,402.20: COURT FINES 54,499.10: ORDINANCE VIOLATIONS 
4.194.69: GARBAGE CHARGES 152.980.62: INTEREST INCOME 10,599.62: 
EQUIPMENT RENTAL 1.00: OTHER REVENUES 4,003.44: BILLED EXPENSE 
101,488.80; RECOVERY OF COSTS 63,551.36: INSURANCE PROCEEDS, NET 
259.55: INSTALLMENT CONTRACT PROCEEDS 52,638.00: 
TOTAL REVENUES 1,340,295.14 

LESS-EXPENDITURES 1,579,659.12 

ENDING FUND BALANCE . 229.929.92CR 

EXPENDrrURES: ACE HARDWARE HOME CENTER 2,044.85: ADVANTA FINAN- 
CIAL 4,741 .62 AFLAC 348.50: ALBERT L WYSOCKI 5,498.75: ROBERT E. ALECK- 
SON 43,889.75: AMERICAN UFE 6,684.36: AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK 250.00: 
AMER1TECH 6,842.03: AMERITECH 3,048.47: AMSTON SUPPLY, INC. 2,085.41: 
ILA M. BAUER 580.00: CHARLENE BEYER 7,372.05: SCOTT C. BISTRY 4.330.00: 
EUZABETH A BONNER 1,995.53: BROWNING-FERRIS INDUSTRIES 14,266.45: 
DANIEL J. BURCH 1,476.00: CELLULAR ONE 4,220.93: CENCOM E-9-1-1 ' 
76,149.67: DIANA A. CESSNA 14,532.83: CLARK ENVIRONMENTAL MOSQUITO 
8,007.40: CLASSIC PRINTERY 1.468.05: COMMERCE-CENSUS 13,500.00: COM- 
MONWEALTH EDISON 4,301.28: COMMUNICATIONS DIRECT 3,470.00: CON- 
SUMERS COOPERATIVE 30,715.00: CUSTOM VEHICLE SYSTEM, INC. 2,993.50: 
JODI L DAVIS 17.427.45: DEVERY ENGINEERING. INC 29,738.00: DICTAPHONE 
5,135.00: EMPLOYER'S HEALTH INSURANCE 109,680,98: SCOTT FIRNBACH 
38,042.52; DONALD D. GARDINER 3.668.00: REBECCA L GERSTEIN 987.59; 
RATTI S. GiLARDI 3,933.61: GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING, INC. 24,837.50; 
DANIELLE J. HAESE 2,351.60: HOWARD JENS 23,775.04: ILL MUN. RETIREMENT 
FUND 10,894.61: ILUNOIS DEPT OF REVENUE 16,728.29: INDEPENDENT 
INSPECTIONS 25,077.50: INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE 311.26: HOWARD 
JENS 1 1 ,824.01: BRUCE N. JOHNSON 54,460.94: GEORGE JOHNSON 1,246.74: 
KALE UNIFORMS 5,523.45: MELANIE KESSLER 2,400.00: CLARENCE KROPP 
1.457.38: LAKE COUNTY RABIES CONTROL 5,324.00: LAKE FOREST HOSPITAL 
2,596.00: LAKELAND COMMUNITY BANK 130,286.93: LAKELAND COMMUNITY 
BANK 49,681.68: JENNIFER I. LANG 1,945.30: NICHOLAS H. LEARSCH 655.50: 
LEE J. HOWARD & ASSOCIATES 691.00: LENNY HOFFMAN EXCAVATING INC. 
46,666.63: SHANNON V. LERSCH 1,204.50: UNDA M. LUCASSEN 530.39: M P H 
INDUSTRIES INC 2,592.00: KEVIN J. MAGEE 42,860.25: MAGNA & HAUSER 
147,845.45: SHANNON R. MAY 100.63: JEAN M. MCCUE 2,460.00: MELANIE 
KESSLER 2.535.00: METROPOUTAN ENFORCEMENT GROUP 6.600.00: NORMA 
J. NELSON 15.402.89: NORTH SHORE WASTE 134,124.92: DONALD OTTO 
14,314.75: PERFORMANCE PAVING LTD. 5.430.00: ANNA M. POINT 119.31: 
WILLIAM E. POIRIER 504.00: POUCE PENSION FUND 25,229.43: MELANIE M. 
PORTZEN 1,109.38: POSTMASTER ROUND LAKE 5,023.20: GEOFFREY T. 
PRETKEUS 14,41 7.1 7: 'PROFESSIONAL TEMPORARIES, INC 2.B64.00: R&M 
AUTO BODY 2,983.40: R.V. NORENE & ASSOCIATES, INC 37,170.24: DANNY E. 
RAINS 1.753.25: RAY SCHRAMER & CO 184.20: RANETT R. REUTER 33,585.57: 
MICHAEL C. ROBINSON 4B.S12.23; ROLF C. CAMPBELL &. . ASSOCIATES 
3i.3io.ai: JAMES' R.SANATO 30,563.'41: JEROME E.' SCHNEIDER 12,872.47: 
SHORE GALLERIES; INC. 4.492.40; SKOKIE VALLEY ASPHALT 1,224.24: STAR L 
SOUTHWORTH 12,023.35: MICHAEL P. STACHULA 32,052.92: DAN E. SUCHOWS- 
Kt 14,092.00: PATRICK J. SUCHOWSKI 368.48: JOHN R. TEUBERT 2.160.00: 
KHAUA THAYASUT 31,944.71: UNOCAL 23,604.86: DANIEL R. VEIT 44,625,68; 
VHF COMMUNICATIONS 3,700.00: VILLAGE OF ROUND LAKE PARK 90.21: 
WARNING UTES OF ILUNOIS INC 3,123.91: KENNETH J. WICH 1, 476.00; TINA M. 
WILUAMS 28,028.21: WINDY CITY UNIFORMS 4,335.73: JOELLE L YESTER 
898.87: ANDREW J. ZIEBELL 1,415.95: LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUST- 
MENTS INCLUDED ABOVE: 241,144.25: 

GENERAL CORPORATE TOTAL 1,579,659.12 

MOTOR FUELTAX FUND 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 
REVENUES: MOTOR FUELTAX 

TOTAL REVENUES 
LESS-EXPENDITURES 
ENDING FUND BALANCE 
EXPENDITURES: 

AMSTON SUPPLY. INC 4.855.71: DEVERY ENGINEERING. INC 7.303.75: LENNY 
HOFFMAN EXCAVATING INC. 183.697.61: NORTH AMERICAN SALT COMPANY 
19,263.51: RAY SCHRAMER & CO 2,227.25: SKOKIE VALLEY ASPHALT 2,179.84: 
VILLAGE OF ROUND LAKE PARK 5,542.20: 
LESS PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE: 1.281.80CR: 

MOTOR FUELTAX FUND 228,923.62 

I.M.R.F. FUND 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 25,392.02 

REVENUES: PROPERTY TAX 60,130.90: REPLACEMENT 

TAX 69.31: 

TOTAL REVENUES 60,200.21 
LESS - EXPENDITURES 67,555.89 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 18,036.34 

EXPENDITURES: 

ILL MUN. RETIREMENT FUND 18,698.19: INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE 
4.664.70: LAKELAND COMMUNITY BANK 58,599.28: POUCE PENSION FUND 
238.17: LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE: 
15.195.85: . i 

I.M.R.F. FUND TOTAL 67,555.89 

ROAD & BRIDGE 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 13,819.80 

REVENUES: ROAD & BRIDGE TAX 3,992.20 
TOTAL REVENUES 3,992.20 

LESS -EXPENDITURES 2,932.92 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 19,879.08 

EXPENDITURES: 

AMSTON SUPPLY, INC. 1.320.09: LENNY HOFFMAN EXCAVATING INC. 1.236.51: 
SKOKIE VALLEY ASPHALT 376.32: 

ROAD & BRIDGE TOTAL 2,932.92 

UABIUTY INSURANCE 

5,918.16 
59,350.06: 
59.350.06 
64,950.52 



214,395.70 

93,571.92: INTEREST INCOME 4.072.76: 

97,644.68 
228,928.62 

83,111.76 



BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 
REVENUES: PROPERTY TAX 

TOTAL REVENUES 
LESS -EXPENDITURES 



ENDING FUND BALANCE 
EXPENDITURES: 

ILUNOIS PUBUC* RISK FUND 44,434.00: MOUDORS INSURANCE 52,916.52; 
LESS - PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE: 32,400.00: 

UABIUTY INSURANCE TOTAL 64,950.52 

AUDIT FUND 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 3,307.57 

REVENUES; PROPERTY TAXES 7,418.87; 

TOTAL REVENUES 7,418.87 . 

LESS-EXPENDITURES 7,300.00 

. ENDING FUND BALANCE 3,426.44 

EXPENDITURES: 

7,300.00: LEE J. HOWARD & ASSOCIATES 

AUDIT FUND TOTAL 7,300.00 

POUCE PROTECTION 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 22,449.61 

REVENUES: PROPERTY TAXES 23,037.24: 

. TOTAL REVENUES 23,037.24 

LESS-EXPENDITURES 25,846.28 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 19,640.57 

EXPENDITURES: 

DONALD D. GARDINER 6,407.00; ILUNOIS DEPT OF REVENUE 398.22: 
CLARENCE KROPP 1,035.63: LAKELAND COMMUNITY BANK 2,197.27: WILUAM 
E POIRIER 504.00: POUCE PENSION FUND 22.67: DANNY £ RAINS 3,469.75: 
RANDY R. REUTER 251 .94: JERMONE E SCHNEIDER 2,471 .20: 
LESS - PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE: 9.088.60CR; 
POUCE PROTECTION TOTAL 25,846.28 

DEBT SERVICE FUND 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 24,502,94 

REVENUES: PROPERTY TAX 134.708.75: INTEREST 
2,063.67: BOND PROCEEDS 955.000.00: 
TOTAL REVENUES 1 ,091 ,772.42 

LESS -EXPEN DITURES 1,11 5,528.86 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 746.50 

EXPENDITURES: 

AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK 141,395.16: CAUSEY DEMGAN & MOORE INC. 
3,500.00: CHAPMAN AND CUTLER 12,650.00: GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING, 
INC. 665.00; R.V. NORENE & ASSOCIATES, INC 12,957.50: 
LESS - PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE: 941 .928.48CR: 

DEBT SERVICE FUND TOTAL 1,115,528.86 

WATER FUND 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 2,203,129.58 

REVENUES; PENALTIES 2.965.95: TAGS/SHUT OFF 4.977.40: WATER SALES 
637,790.87: METER SALES 400.08: INTEREST INCOME 28,293.80: 
TOTAL REVENUES ' 674.428.1 
LESS-EXPENDITURES 732.293.76 

ENDING FUND BALANCE • 2,145,263.92 

EXPENDITURES: 

ACE HARDWARE HOME CENTER 2,092.99: AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK 
58.457.50: AMSTON SUPPLY. INC 230.2V. BANK ONE OHIO TRUST CO. 
134,257.50: CASE CREDIT 11,133.97: CENTRAL LAKE COUNTY JOtNT 
232,101.18: CLASSIC PRINTERY 1,206.48: COMMONWEALTH EDISON 1,924.49. 
CONSUMERS COOPERATIVE 5,635.00*. JODI L DAVIS 4.502.25: DEVERY ENGI- 
NEERING, INC 15.090.00: EMPLOYER'S HEALTH INSURANCE 12,784.78: 
ALPHONSE S. FALCO 13.531.10: SCOTT FIRNBACH: FIRST STATE BANK OF 
ROUND LAKE 3.341 :44; PATTl S. GILARDI 3.558.78: GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNT- 
ING, INC. 1.992.60: ILL MUN. RETIREMENT FUND 3.854.63: ILUNOIS DEPT OF 
REVENUE 2.452.51: INDEPENDENT INSPECTIONS 2,633.75: GEORGE JOHN- 
SON 43.776.96: LAKE COUNTY PUBUC WORKS 104.00: LAKELAND COMMUNI- 
TY BANK 17.098.89: LENNY HOFFMAN EXCAVATING INC. 110,325.35: POST- 
MASTER ROUND LAKE 943.59; SIDENER SUPPLY COMPANY 2.807.50: STAR L 
SOUTHWORTH 4,093.99; PATRICK J. SUCHOWSKI 17.084.97: UNOCAL 9,847.62: - 
VILLAGE OF ROUND LAKE PARK 180,00: 
LESS PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE 144.31CR: 

WATER FUND TOTAL 732,293.78 

SEWER FUND 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 333,884.12 

REVENUES: PENALTIES 17.782.91: SEWER CHARGES 130.801.18: LC. R.S. 
ADMINISTRATIVE CHARGS 9,476.43: INTEREST INCOME 163.17: 
TOTAL REVENUES 158,223.69 

LESS EXPENDITURES 147,446.34 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 344,661.47 

EXPENDITURES; 

AFLAC 65.92: AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK 16,250.00: AMERITECH 153. 1 4: 
AMSTON SUPPLY, INC. 684.05: ANTIOCH ELECTRIC 6.427.23: DIANA A. CESSNA 
7,829.53: CLASSIC PRINTERY 8.40: COMMONWEALTH EDISON 36.970.78: CON- 
SUMERS COOPERATIVE 3,550.00: JODI L DAVIS 9,435.50: DEBORAH KRUSCHE 
BRUCK. 92.63: EMPLOYER'S HEALTH INSURANCE 14,977.53: ALPHONSE S. 
FALCO 10,956.73: FIRST STATE BANK OF ROUND LAKE 7,560.01: PATTl S. 
GILARDI 3,558.61: GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING, INC. 2.334.70; ILL MUN 
RETIREMENT FUND 2.799.84: ILUNOIS DEPT OF REVENUE 1 ,775.47: INTERNAL . 
REVENUE SERVICE 835.97: J.R. MYERS CO., INC. 86.383.63: LAKE COUNTY 
PUBUC WORKS 378,742.10: LAKELAND COMMUNITY BANK 12,088.04: NORMA 
J. NELSON 8,091.49: RAY SCHRAMER & CO 968.28: SIDENER SUPPLY COMPA- 
NY 3.000.81: STAR L SOUTHWORTH 4,093.83: DAN E SUCHOWSKI 4,365.25: 
PATRICK J. SUCHOWSKI 13.742.70: UNOCAL 3.066.33: VILLAGE OF ROUND 
LAKE PARK 180.00: JOELLE L YESTER 898.88: 

LESS - PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS INCLUDED ABOVE 497.235.76: 
SEWER FUND TOTAL 147,445.34 

POUCE PENSION FUND 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 2114(26.91 

REVENUES: PROPERTY TAXES 60.521.44: INVESTMENT EARNINGS 

11,786.32: EMPLOYEE CONTRIBUTIONS 26,567.61: 

TOTAL REVENUES 98.875.37 

LESS EXPENDITURES 2.907.39 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 307,196.89 

EXPENDITURES: 

LEE J. HOWARD & ASSOCIATES 828.75: LESS-PAYROLL TAXES AND ADJUST- 
MENTS INCLUDED ABOVE 1.341. 40CR:. 

POUCE PENSION FUND TOTAL 2,907.39 

CERTIFICATION 
I, LEE J. HOWARD, TREASURER of VILLAGE OF ROUND LAKE PARK. LAKE 
COUNTY, Illinois do hereby certify that the above Is a true copy of the annual 
Treasurer's Report for the fiscal year ending APRIL 30,1997. 
lsA.ee J, Howard 
LEE J. HOWARD, TREASURER 

0398-1 668-RL 
March 13. 1998 



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LEGAL NOTICES 



March 13, J998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
LEGAL NOTICE 

The following parcels of property,, acquired though the Tax Sale Certificate 
Program, are being offered for sale by the County of Lake. 

Written bids should be submitted lo the County of Lake, Tax Exlension Dept„ Room 
101, 18 N. County St., Waukegan, IL 60085. 

Bids receive will be retained for 30 days alter the initial bid. After completion of ihe 
30-day period, the County has the right to accept the highest bid or to reject it if the 
amount is Insufficient or if the sale would not be in Ihe best interest of Lake County 
Taxpayers. 

Willard Rooks Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
INCORPORAT ED QURN EE 60031 

Ellis Av. 07-23-210-001 

OSkokieHwy. ' 07-24-122-005 

Skokie Hwy. 07-24-223-001 

University Av. 07-23-209-002 

University Av. 07-23-209-003 

University Av. 
University Av. 
University Av. 
University Av. 



07-23-209-004 
07-23-209-006 
07-23-210-005 
07-23-2)0-011 



0398B-1664-GP 
March 13, 1993 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
LEGAL NOTICE 
The following parcels of properly, acquired though the Tax Sale Certificate 
Program, are being offered for sale by tho County of Lako. 

Written bids should bo submitted lo the County of Lake, Tax Extension Dopt., Room 
101, 18 N. County St.. Waukegan, IL 60085. 

Bids receive will be retained for 30 days after Ihe initial bid. After completion of the 
30-day period, the County has the right to accept the highest bid or to reject il if the 
amount is insufficient or if the sale would not bo in Iho best interest of Lake County 

Taxpayers. 

Willard Rooks Helander 

Lake County Clork 

60020 

05-1 5-400027 

05-09-400-137 

05-10-100-203 

05-09-200-020 

05-14-112-013 

05-10-410-015 

05-11-304-008 

6004} 

05-14-213-020 

05-14-213-019 

05-14-213017 

05-14-213-016 

05-14-213-015 

05-14-213-014 

05-21-201-033 

05-14-215041 

05-14-215-0.44 

05-14-215-046 

05-13-110-013 

05-13-110-012 

05-14-201-024 

05-14-323-002 

O5-14-312-O01 

05-14-312-010 

05-12-100-023 

05-15-402-023 

05-15-402-022 

05-14-300-O3B 

05-16-306-025 

60081 

01-33-318-020 

01-33-318-019 

01 -33-31 8-Oia 

01 -33-31 8-01 7 

01-33-318-016 

01-33-318-015 

01-33-318-014 

01-33-31B-013 

01-33-318-012 

01-33-318-011 

01-33-323-002 

01-34-310-012 

01-34-100-001 

01-34-120-017 

05-04-111-019 

05-04-111-013 

05-04-102-003 

05-04-1 02-0C2 

05-04-101-006 

05-04-101-005 

05-04-101-002 

01-33-324-009 

01-33-318-010 

01 -33-31 B-009 

01-33-318-008 

01 -33-31 B-007 

01-33-318-006 

01-33-318-005 

01 -33-31 B-004 

01-33-318-003 

01-33-318-002 

01 -33-31 B-001 

01-33-30B-008 

01-33-308-007 

0504-110-012 

01-33-328-010 

01-33-328-011 

05-04- 102-008 

01-34-314-012 

039BB-1662-FL 

March 13, 1998 



27521 W. Chris Larkin Rd. 

Eagle Point Rd. 

S, Holly Av. 

908 Lako Shore Dr. 

Whitton St. 

79 Maple Av. 

213 Mastodon Dr. 

UNINC ORPORATED INGLESIDE 

26277 W. Black hawk Av. 

26279 W. Blackhawk Av. 

26295 W. Blackhawk Av. 

26301 W, Blackhawk A v. 

26307 W. Blackhawk Av. 

26319 W. Blackhawk Av. 

34955 N, Gogol Av. 

35522 N. Helcndale Rd. 

35516 N. Helendalo Rd. 

35512 N. Helcndale Rd. 

25848 W. Hillside Av. 

25860 W. Hillside Av. 

26450 W. Hudson Av. 

35184 N. Ingleside Dr. 

3534B N. Ingleside Dr. 

35266 N. Ingleside Dr. 

36625 N. lola Av. 

2700B W. Longwood Dr. 

27016 W. Longwood Dr. 

35212 N. Shoreline Dr. 

28565 W. Valley Rd. 

UNINCORPORATED SPRING GROVE 

3B1 16 N. Burton Av. 

38122 N. Burton Av. 

38128 N. Burton Av. 

38134 N. Burton Av. 

38144 N. Burton Av. 

38156 N. Burton Av. 

38164 N. Burton Av. 

3B170 N. Burton Av, 

38176 N. Burton Av. 

38184 N. Burton Av. 

38111 N.Channel Dr. 

38343 N. Dawn Circle East 

27733 W. Grass Lake Dr. 

27528 W. Greenwood Av. 

37B34 N. Harold PI. 

37854 N. Harold PI. 

37971 N.NippersinkPI. 
37977 N. Nippersink PI. 
37968 N. Nippersink PI. 

37972 N. Nippersink PI. 
37966 N. Nippersink PI. 
3B029 N. Nippersink St. 
381 19 N. Nippersink St. 
38123 N. Nippersink St. 
38129 N. Nippersink St. 
38135 N. Nippersink St. 
38141 N. Nippersink Si. 
38153 N. Nippersink St. 
38163 N. Nippersink St. 
3B169N. Nippersink St. 
38175 N. Nippersink St. 
38183 N. Nippersink St. 
38269 N. State Park Rd. 
38273 N. State Park Rd. 
28977 W.WestlaneAv. 
2B624 W. Kendall Av. 
28616 W. Kendall Av. 
28895 W. Kendall Av. 
38366 N. 51h Av. 



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FOR LEGAL NOTICES IS TUESDAY 

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♦Lakeland netDlRECT offers local phone charges to most of ihe Lake 
County area. Call for information about your prefix. 




ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT PREPARED BY LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS 




March 13, 1998 



Lakeland Newspapers C1 5 



Lake County's biggest job fair slated for May 28 



More than 180 employers will 
recruit for full-time, part-time, sea- 
sonal and professional jobs at the 
May 28 JobMarkct Place '98, an 
employment fair for Lake County 
jobseekers. Expected to be the 
biggest job fair in Lake County this 
year, the event will be held from 1 to 
7 p.m. in the physical educational 
center, Building?, at the College of 



munity organizations, businesses 

and social service agencies, the will include manufacturing, insur- 

employment fair is free arid open to ance, pharmaceutical, banks, gov- 

the public. While the event is primar- emment, education, fast foods, 

Hy designed for job seekers, it is open restaurants, hotels, temporary 

to anyone who wants to change their employment agencies, hospitals and 

career, explore a new career, learn more. Employers will be available to 

about different job options, obtain discuss training opportunities and 

information about different compa- educational requirements for differ- 



nies or get job leads. Jobseekers are 



Lake County, 19351 West Washington encouraged to bring resumes; some 
St., Grayslake, » employers may conduct on-site 

Hosted by 13 Lake County com- interviews. 



Employers represented at the fair Workshops for job seekers will be 

held from 1 to 7 p.m. on Thursday, 
May 21.They include "How to Work 
a Job Fair," "Resume Review," 
"Internet Job Search," "Dress for 
Success," "Effective Interviewing" 
and "Career Decisions." Workshops 
are free and open to the public An 
all-day conference will be offered for 
employers, focusing on recruitment 
strategies, technology and business 
trends and practices. 

The employment fair proved 



ent jobs. JobMarketPlace '98 will also 
include a series of workshops prior 
to the job fair that will benefit both 
employers and job seekers. 



successful last year for both employ- 
ers and job seekers. The fair set a 
new attendance record last year by 
drawing nearly 3,000 job seekers and 
1 80 employers. Among the 60 
employers (out of 180) responding to 
last year's follow-up survey , many 
cited recruitment as their primary 
reason for attending the job fair. For 
complete information on 
JobMarketPlace '98, call the College 
of Lake County Career and 
Placement Services at 543-2059. 



ar 




Positions 



IS 



m 



Enjoy banking hours and no Saturdays! Abbott 
Laboratories Employees Credit Union is growing 

again and currently seeking an experienced 
LOAN PROCESSOR requiring high degree of 

detail and accuracy; NEW MEMBER REP, 

MEMBER SERVICES REP, and TELLERS. If 

you enjoy working with people, have good figure 

aptitude, cash handling, and PC skills, 

this could be your opportunity. 

Please send salary history and resume to: 

ALEC-dept, H.R. * 

401 N. Riverside Drive, Gurnee, IL 60031 

or fax to (847)938-5681 

AA/EEO/Smokc-frcc/Prc-employment drug screen. No agencies ft — 



Electrician/Electrical Inspector- City of North Chicago, Illinois- 
(Salary Range: $38,384-$49,630) "The City of North Chicago is 
seeking ^skilled professional with a/'Can-Do" attitude to be 
responsible for the installation and maintenance of all electrical 
equipment and facilities of our City. The duties include, but are not 
limited to ^reviewing construction plans, making cost estimates, 
ordering parts, maintaining records on work performed, perform- 
ing electrical inspections, conducting meetings and maintaining 
effective working relationships with City officials and employees. 
Eight years of progressive work experience and a high school diplo- 
ma. Position also requires BOCA certification within one (1) year. 

TOAPPLY: Send resume, letter of 

interest, salary requirements and references to Human Resources, 

1850 Lewis Avenue, North Chicago, 1L60064. 

For additional information, see joblisting on web page* 

(www.wwa.com/-nchicago) Residency required, EOE/ADA 



The Prudential Insurance Company of 

America is seeking bright and energetic 
people for a sales career in insurance 
and financial services. We offer full 
training, competitive benefits and a 
training allowance up to $600 per week. 

Contact: 
Glenn Kosiba 
or Brian Schmidt 
at 847-392-3400 

EOE - M/F/V/H 
MRA-94-1023 



Prudential 

Insurance 




Corporate Address: 
761 Broad Street 
Newark, N J 07103 



Mark your calendar now! 

JobMarketPlace 98 

for Lake County job seekers and employers 

- Employer events 

-Job seeker events- May 21 

-Employment fair-May 28 

College of Lake County 
19351 W. Washington St., Grayslake IL 

Job seeker events 
Thursday, May 21 1-7 p.m. 

Prepare for the job fair by attending free 

workshops on resume preparation and writing; 

career decisions; effective interviewing; 

Internet job search and dress for success. 

Lake County s Biggest Employment Fair 



Thureday^ 
Physical Education Cenieiv Building 7 



Meet with about 180 Lake County employers who 

will recruit for full-time, part-time, seasonal and 

professional employment positions. 

JobMarketPlace "98 is sponsored by 13 Lake 

County community organizations, businesses 

and social service agencies. 

Call 847-543-2059 

for complete information 



C 1 6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SPRING EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK 



. March 13,1998 



,<?m 



SEWING 

"Ladies Sportswear" 



• Day Shift 

• Production bonuses 

• Attendance Awards 

• Vacation Pay 



• Will Train 

• O.T. Premium 

• Health Plan 

• Holiday Pay 



CMcE FASHIONS 

28250 Ballard Dr. Lake Forest, IL. 

847-816-1160 



ask for Laurita 






Accurate Transmissions, Inc., nation's lea'ding transmission 

remanufacturer is currently expanding and in search of key 

players to join pur team. We have excellent opportunities 

for builders, trainees and management personnel who are 

looking to put their mechanical skills to work in a fast 

paced, growing environment. We offer competitive wages 

and full benefits including medical, dental, life, vision and 

40 IK. Applications taken 8 to 5 M-F. 

ACCURATE TRANSMISSIONS 

935 Campus Dr., Mundelein, IL 60060 
(off Butterfield, North of Rt 60) 



Fax: 847-549-9474 
Phone: 847-549-8100 ext. 241 



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847/223-8522 • Fax 847/223-8547 



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Recently Expanded (Added 36,000 sq. ft.)" 




•Body Technicians •Frame Technicians 

•Refinistilng Technicians 

•Estimators •Managers 
•Parts Coordinators 

Full Time and/or Part Time 

• Competitive wage and salary 

• Health Insurance • 40 IK 

• Holiday Pay • Vacation Pay 

Apply at Lake Villa location* 
Applications accepted until 3/27/98 




March 13, 1998 



SPRING EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C * 







W 



AtteAOCiatiocifitflio ci «> e o e a at «*o*io(>#»<»<» 






VERY GOOD 




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Crystal Lake Amoco 

E Convenient Store & Car Wash 339 Virginia St. in Crystal Lake 

z Round Lake Amoco £ 

* Convenient Store & Car Wash 320 W. Nippersink in Round Lake * 

* Antioch Amoco z 

Z Convenient Store & Car Wash Rt. 45 & 173 in Antioch . • 

z Gary Amoco z 

Z Convenient Store & Car Wash Rt. 14 & Silver Lake Rd. in Cary Z 
Z NOW HIRING 

i * CASHIERS* : 

* Part Time-Days, Evenings & Weekends & Late Nights/ Full Time -Late Nights z 

* ( Friendly, Customer Oriented People, Only Please) Z 
Z Great Atmosphere. % 

Z l " m "WBHME. COMPLETE CASHIER SECURITY!" 

Z Please Call (847) 740-1064 » 

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Direct hire said temporary placement 
in the cbunties^lea<ing companies 

ingiii: 

Administrative • General Office •Accounting. 
Sales • Customer Service • Professional 

Data Processing •Medical : • Warehouse 

Call MATTHEWS Today 

Evenings By Appointment 



WAUKEGAN 

321 Grand Avenue 
Waukegan, IL 60085 

• : . (847) 244-6500 



LIBERTYVILLE 

311 E. Park Avenue 
Libertyville, IL 60048 

(847)367-1117 




WHEELING 

605 N. Wolf Road 
Wheeling, IL 60090 

(847)215:0060 



m 



SERVING 

Your 
Community 
With Pride! 




We're a banking industry leader in Chicago & surrounding 
communities! We need friendly individuals to help us continue 
our 100+ yrs. of 'quality service throughout Chicagoland. 
When you join our dynamic team, you'll enjoy: 

• PENSION/ESOP/40KK) 

• FAMILY FRIENDLY BENEFITS 

• TUITION REIMBURSEMENT FOR FULL TIME 

REGION AL SALES REPS 

FULL TIME 

Do you have a min. of 2-3 yrs. customer 

service & cash handling exp.? 

Take advantage of this outstanding career opportunity & travel 
to various In-Store branches, assist managers & have Teller 
operations/customer service responsibilities. College degree 
& banking exp. preferred. 

CUSTOMER SALES REPS 

FULL TIME 

Are you a self-motivated team-player? Do you 

have at least 1-2 yrs. service/sales exp, & 

excellent communication skills? 

Help us continue our success by. fulfilling our customers needs 

& actively marketing/selling our products & services. 

Banking exp. preferred. 

TELLERS 

FULL & PART TIME 

Do you have a min. of 6 months cash 

. handling & customer service exp.? 

Utilize your skills & gain great exp. by maintaining/balancing 
a cash drawer & providing excellent customer service. 

■ 

Please apply in person at location of interest: 

• 3901 Kirchoff Rd., ROLLING MEADOWS 

* 1 W. Dundee Rd., BUFFALO GROVE 

WITHIN DOMINICKS: 



WEEKEND PAY DIFFERENTIAL! 



722 E. Rollins Rd. ( ROUND LAKE BEACH 

• 252 S. Randall Rd., ELGIN 

• 7801 Waukegan Rd., NILES 

• 1245 Rand Rd., PROSPECT HEIGHTS 



Or forward resume, indicating position/location of interest, to: ST. PAUL FEDERAL BANK FOR 
SAVINGS, 6700 W. North Ave., Chicago, IL 60707. Fax: (773) 804-2440. 

StPaul Federal Bank 




~ ~ For Savings 




LAMBS FARM 



LAMBS FARM is a residential and vocational training site for 
adults with mental disabilities. 

The following positions are currently available for seasonal employment: 



Ice Cream Parlour 

•Customer Service 

Children's Amusement Area 

•Petting Zoo 
•Miniature Grain Ride 
•Pontoon Boar Ride 



Snack Shop 

•Grill Person 
•Customer Service 

• Small Animal Nursery 
•Miniature Golf 
•Carousel Ride 



The following are non-seasonal Full-Time or Part Time positions: 
Operation Department 

Bakery Country Store 

•Preparation of donuts, •Production of jams & 

cookies etc. jellies 

Gift Shop 

Retail (part-time) 

Residential Department 

Daily Living Aide 

•Transport participants to various appointments 
Direct Care 

•Work with participants living in an Intermediate Care Facility 
Relief House Manager 

•Weekend hours-Coordinate daily living activities for aduits 
living in a group home 

Vocational Department 

Work Center 

•Vocational Trainer-Provide training and follow-up support. 

Apply in person or mail/fax (847) 362-0742 to: Lambs Farm 
194 & Rt 176, Libertyville, IL 60048, 847-362-4636 x224 




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CI 8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



(OOJVUO TiteWAV^VTO- &W$% 



SPRING EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK 



fiUl *.l iV.-ivVi 



March 13, 1998 



JOIN THE LARGEST PROUIDER 
OF CHILD CARE IN THE U.S.! 

The YMCA is the largest provider in the United States for Child Care and 
the Lake County Family YMCA is currently accepting applications for 
Teachers and Teacher's Assistants for their growing child care centers 
throughout Lake County. ' 

• Excellent starting salary • Vacation & Holiday pay 

• Ongoing Training • Advancement Opportunities 

• Child Care Discounts • Membership to the YMCA 

• Retirement, Medical/Vision & Dental Insurance 

Qualifications for Teachers: 1 year college, with 6 credits in child develop- 
ment and 1 year of experience in child care. Assistants: 18 years old, H.S. 
or GED diploma. Will train. Fax (847) 623-2386 or mail your resume to: 

Gussie Monks, V.P. of Child Care 

Lake County Family YMCA 

2000 Western Ave. 

Waukegan. (L 60087 

Join the #7 provider of Child Care • the YMCA - today! 



RN/LPN 

7am - 3 pm & 3pm - 11pm shifts available 

F/T Medicare Nurse for long term facility, clinical and 
documentation skills are a vital part of this position. 
Strong team leading a plus. « 

CNA'S 

FULL/PART TIME/ALL SHIFTS 

COME JOIN OUR TEAM!!! 

• Must be Certified & Registered in State of Illinois 

• $6.50/hr to start . 
i • Good Benefits 

• Excellent Working Environment 



Bonus Program Available 



NORTH SHORE TERRACE 

2222 W. 14th Street • Waukegan, IL 60085 



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MOW HIRING! 

Get connected with one of Lake County's fastest growing 
staffing services! We work with over 50 of the best manu- 
facturing companies in the area. Many temp-to-perm posi- 
tions available. Choose from electronic assembly, * ware- 
house, machine operation, printing/bindery and many 
morel! Apply Mon. - Fri., 9am - 3pm at: 

Staff Link 

Personnel Service, Inc. 

1410 Washington Street 
Waukegan, IL 60085 

625-9905 




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We have an immediate opening for an individual for our 
M.I.S. operation. The ideal candidate will have at least 
.jDne year's programming experience using RPG/40.0 or 
*RPG3 on an IBM AS/400 or System 38 in a manufactur- 
ing environment. Familiarity with MAPICS is desirable. 
Experience in LAN environment a plus. Qualified candi- 
date may apply at or send/fax resume to: 

Danaher Controls 

1675 Delany Road • Gurnee, IL 60031 
Fax: 847-662-6633 



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We are 
Midwestern 



WHAT WE'RE 
ALL ABOUT!!! 



Due to our 

growth and expansion, 

we have openings in the 

following areas: 



Medical Center 



What Makes 

/? 



i 



PROFESSIONAL 

Assistant Director of Physician Office Practice! --'■'■ 
Director of Oncology Patient Services 
Clinical Pharmacy Director (PharmD) ■ . 
Go-Director Pastoral Care:. CPE. ^ 

TECHNICAL 

RNs: F/T. P/T & Flex Pool 

Med/Surg •Oncolpgy/Bone Marrow Transplant«jCU*Clinical 

Sign-on Bonuses of $1000-2000 For Some Of the Above Positions 

PCT: F/T, P/T 2nd Shifts & Nights 

Pharmacy Tech: Flex Pool 

Phlebotomist: Flex Pool, AMs & Weekends 

Radiologic Technologists: Flex Pool 

Nuclear Med Tech: Flex Pool 

SUPPORT SERVICES ^ 

Data Clerk/Researcher: Full-Time > 

Drivers: ... Flex Pool 

Housekeeping: Flex Pool & F/T.' 

Medical Billing & Collections: F/T & Temporary 



For consideration send fax/resume (INDICATING POSITION OF INTEREST) to 
Jeannie Pflueger, Human Resources, 2520 Elisha Ave., Zion, IL 60099, 
FAX: 847-872-6222. 

EOEM/F/V/D. 



Wc are part of Cancer Treatment Centers of America, a nationally 

recognized leader in innovative cancer care. 
2. As a beautiful 95 bed state-of-the-art hospital, we encompass the latest 

technological advancements as an Oncology provider. 

We have been serving Lake County for over, 50 years and treat our 

employees like part of our family, not just an institution. 

Our environment promotes personal involvements between staff and 

patients emphasizing the importance of physchological and nutritional care 

resulting in comprehensive patient-intensive health care and professionar 

growth opportunities. 
5. Our quality of patient care programs is internationally renowned, drawing 

patients form all over the world. 

We Offer Competitive Salaries And Exceptional Benefits 
For Full & Part-Time! 

D Medical/Dental G 

O 401(k) G 

D Tuition Reimbursement G 

O Vacation/Holiday, Sick and Personal Days G 

G Opportunity for Growth O 




.. 



March 13, 1998 



SPRING EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C 1 9 




Want to earn up to $200 per week and be your own 
boss? The Daily Herald is looking for adult, indepen- 
dent personnel for porch delivery in the Lake County 
area. Hours are Monday thru Friday, 3am to 6am and 
Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays 4am to 7am 

For More Information Call 




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Banking 



Insurance agency seeking candidate with 3-4 

years bookkeeping/accounting experience to fill 

full time position. Duties incliide; working with 

our agency's ;. &RA* on ^accounts payable, direct 

bill and month end reconciliations and clerical 

experience. Windows ©s/Insurance knowledge 

helpful! We are seeMiig a "self starter" 

with a ^oal^V*fe ; attitude 

who enjoys working with people!!! 

Please mail complete presume with experience to: 

BoxHH 
c/o Lakeland Newspapers 



::■: 



Box 268 



Grayslake, IL 60030 



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Greatjobs 



COME IN ALL 



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Forget one size Jits all. At Great Lakes Credit Union, we're growing 
so fast we've got all kinds of jobs to choose from. And with over 

100,000 members and five separate locations, you can bet we'll keep 
you challenged and motivated. The opportunities here go on and on. 

Here's your chance to find the one that's right for you! 

•Administrative Assistants 

•Tellers 

•Financial Service Reps 

•Call Center Manager 

•Call Center Reps 

•Collectors 

•Loan Payout Reps 

•Loan Data Entry Reps 

•Card Services Reps 

•Loan Sales Reps 
•Fraud Specialist 
•File Coordinator 

we offer a bigger and better benefits package that includes 

cash Incentives, a 401 (k) plan, tuition reimbursement, 

medical/dental insurance, and paid vacations, holidays and 

personal time. Make your move to a company thafs on the 

move! Send your resume, along with a cover letter and 

salary history, Indicating position of interest, to: Great Lakes 

Credit Union, Attn: Staffing, 2525 Green Bay Road, North 

Chicago, IL 60064. Fax: (847) 887-8798. 

EOE/Smokc Free 
Environment. 



' - ■ ' *•*? * - * * ■ ' ■ •_ 

Join the AGE team! 



NOW HIRING 

FULL TIME & PART TIME DAYS • EVENINGS • WEEKENDS 

>$% A pleasant working atmosphere, along with competitive 
r%Pf&^*** wa 9 es ' an d lne opportunity for advancement 

FULL TIME BENEFITS INCLUDE HOLIDAY PAY, 
MEDICAL INSURANCE, LIFE INSURANCE & PAID VACATION 

- APPLY IN PERSON - 



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Hardware 



Route134 Route137 Routes 132 & 21 Routes 83 JfWSns 609 L Hawky Ukehtnt 

ROUND LAKE LIBERTYV1LLE GURNEE JtOUWI LUCE BEACH MUNDELEIN ComoienN Center 
546-4668 362-3340 336-0101 223-0190 556-1100 ^^ 










s wmnif _ 
Positions available; Assistant Director & Preschool 
Teachers. Rill Time or Part Time needed. Mast have an 
associates degree with ECE qdif (cations. 

In the Island Lake Area 

(847) 487-765' 




M 



Get On the Circuit 
of Success at 
MANU-TRONICS! 






TOP WAGES *" 
FOR TOP 
EXPERIENCE!!!!! * 




SURFACE MOUNT 
TECHNOLOGY 
OPPORTUNITIES 
AVAILABLE NOW AT 
MANU-TRONICS, INC. 

Manu-Tremlcs, a leading electronics manufacturer in Kenosha, has BIG news... We've just added additional 
surface mount equipment to our clean, modem facility. We're now seeking EXPERIENCED individuals for 
the following IMMEDIATE positions: 

SURFACE MOUNT QUALITY INSPECTORS 

• 1st, 2nd & 3rd Shifts • 

Help us reduce defects and increase production by inspecting 
products as they run on SMT lines and resolving any problems. 
Must be self-motived and have previous experience with quality 
troubleshooting and SMT solder joint inspection under a 
microscope. Familiarity with IPC specifications essential. 
Knowledge of one of the following operations is helpful: FUJI 
FCP4. FCP6, FIPII, FIPIII, screen priming and/or gtuedot 
applications. If you have any background with these machines, 
we want to talk to you ! 

SMT MACHINE OPERATORS 

•3rd Shift* 

Machine operators will perform set up. operation and daily maintenance of surface mount equipment. 
Requires set-up/operation knowledge of FUJI FCP4, FCP6, FIPII. FIPIII. GSP2; MPM screen printer, 
and Camalot glue dispensing system. SMT component identification, placemcnt/solderability 
specifications background a must. 

We offer clean & modem working facility, 40 IK rcliremcnt/profit sharing, medical/life insurance, paid 
holjdays & vacations. Please apply in person or fax/send resume to: 

MANU-TRONICS, INC 
8701 100th Street 
Lake vie w Corporate Park ' 
Kenosha, \VI 53142 
Fax: 414-947-7722 

(Conveniently located east of 1-94; 2 miles north of the Illinois border) Equal Opportunity Employer i 




MANU-TRONICS, Inc. 




, C20 I Lakeland Newspapers 



SPRING EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK 



March 13, 1998 




NOW HIRING! 

ALL SHIFTS!! 

Days, Nights & Weekends 

• Cooks 

• Counter Help 

• Car Hops 



Mi«r Apply in Person &jrfc 



Corner of Rollins Rd &, Washington St 

Ingleside 587-6808 



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JUMP START YOUR CAREER 

Become a Sales Representative for Sentry Insurance and 

give your career a jump start, if you have the drive to 

succeed, we have the tool to get you going! Wegre an A+ 

rated multi-line insurer and we are seeking entrepreneurial 

individuals to join our sales team. We offer: 

• Competitive salary (not a draw), plus commissions. 

• Full range of employee benefits 

• Comprehensive, paid training 

• Proven selling system 

• Full line of quality products 

• We provide the office and administrative support 

Call 1-800-528-2643 or send resume to: 

ENTRY INSURANCE 

977 Lakeview Pkwy. t Suite 170 

Vernon Hills, IL 60061 

FAX (847) 816-6772 

EOE M/F 

www.sentry-insurance.com 



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2) 



the Benefits of 



Working with an Industry Leader! 

VishmTek, a leading manufacturer »f computer peripheral products, lias several exciting opportunities at our 
corporate headquarters in Gurnee. Work Tor a company where everyone shares the spirit and rewards of success! 



ENGINEERING 



ASSOCIATE 



lis individual will assist our Manufacturing Engineer with the following functions including equipment selec- 
tion and implementation, quality procedures, efficiency and quality tracking, new product introduction, equip- 
ment maintenance and process improvements; AS degree in Engineering discipline preferred. .1-.S years related 
experience in Electronics Manufacturing (PCB Assembly, SMC and IMC). Well developed computer skills and 
working knowledge of IPC and JEDEC standards required. JOH CODE: KA 



DESKTOP PUBLISHING 



SPECIALIST 

This is an excellent opportunity Tor a creative individual with expertise in Macintosh & PC environments. Pro- 
duce our employee newsletter, catalog ads, flyers, brochures! posters and other collateral materiats; develop 
original graphics for logo, web site; create promotional documents for products; and other projects. Knowledge 
of PageMaker, QuarkXpress, Ercclland or CorelDraw, PhotoShop and PowerPoint, and excellent communication 
skills are necessary. College degree is preferred. Experience with technical illustration and/or wrilinc is a nlus 
JOJ1 CODE: DPS b ' 




ACCOUNTING 



ANALYST 



The selected candidale will analyze & reconcile price protection and sales rebate claims; review price protected 
customers return requests; and analyze & reconcile disputed items on accounts receivable. Essential skills in- 
clude intermediate Windows, Excel & Word and knowledge of basic math &. accouniinu concents 
JOB CODE; AA h "™l"! s f 



CREDIT 



SPECIALISE 



This position will review, analyze and reconcile the accounts receivables for assigned customer accounts and 
initiate collections calls on account halanccs. Essential skills include intermediate Windows. Excel & Word 
Previous work experience in credit and collections. JOH CODE: CS 



MAC Nl I 



PERATOR 



Surface Mount 

The chosen candidate will operate surface mount equipment to build, inspect and test memory products. Respon- 
sibilities include product changeover, downloading and running product programs, loading/unloading feeder trays 
identifying SMT components and verifying program with BOM and work order. Experience on Philips, Panasonic', 
Fuji and/or Universal equipment preferred. Other requirements include fluency in written and oral English, basic 
computer knowledge, attention to detail and mechanical aptitude. JOH CODE: SMT 



REPAIR 



[TECHNICIAN 

Surface Mount 

This position will operate equipment to troublcshoot and repair memory products, Responsibilities include prod- 
uct changeover, basic soldering, and visual 2c inspection of product. Qualifications include previous repair expe- 
rience in electronics & fine-pitched components hand soldering skills and good attention In detail. JOB CODP* 
SMT REPAIR 

We offer an excellent work environment and a competitive compensation package including medical, dental, 
40100 and more! For immediate consideration, forward your resume, indicating JOB CODE, In: VisiimTvk, 
Attn: Human Rcsourccs-(JOH CODE), 1175 Lakeside Drive, Gurnee, IL 60031. Fax: (H47)360-7424. 
E-mail resume to: human_rcsources@vlslontck.com 

If unable to send a resume, please leave a message on our Employment Hotline ut: (847)360-7250. 



visiontek 

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VICTORY EAKES 

CONTINUING CARE CENTER 



Do you warn to make a difference in our residents' lives? Victory 
Lakes hits the following opportunities for dedicated, hard-working 
people in our clean, modern, and loving long-term care facility. 

CERTIFIED NURSING 

ASSISTANTS — 

PART TIME 

Day, evening and night shift positions available for caring and com- 
passionate people. 20 hours a week with FULL BENEFITS. Must 
be certified in Illinois or near completion. 

FOOD SERVICE — ■ 

PART TIME 

Mature and hard-working Dietary Assistant needed 14 hours a week, 
4-8 pm, to assist with food preparation, serving, and sanitation of 
the Food Service Department, • 



ACTIVITIES ASSISTANT- 
PART TIME 



Creative and resourceful person needed to assist in planning, orga- 
nizing and directing activities for our residents. Experience in thera- 
peutic activities desired. 

Look for further opportunities this summer with the opening of 
The Village at Victory Lakes! 

Please stop by or call: 

Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center 

1055 East Grand Avenue 

Gurnee, IL 60046 

(847)356-5900 

EOE 



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M1JNDELE1N. ILLINOIS 

Under new ownership & 

new management. 

Just completed 

$4 million renovation. 

New restaurant and lounge 

Seeking Individuals For The Following Positions 

• Restaurant & Lounge Manager 

• Sous Chef 

• Banquet Captain $11-$13/hour ., 

• Housekeeping Supervisor $7 50 to $8/hour 

• Cocktail waitress $5/hour 

• Restaurant Waitress/Waiter $6/hour 

We offer excellent benefits, which include: 

Health insurance, vacation pay, 

and employee meals. 

Please apply in person at: 

Holiday Inn Mundelein 

510 East Route 83, Mundelein, IL 60060 

(847)949-5100 

EOE 



March 13, 1998 



SPRING EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK 



M \ CUSTOMER SERVICE 

LONG GRO^E DYNAMIC COMPANY 

Zurich Kemper seeks computer literate individuals 
with solid clerical/ strong communications skills for 

our client -focuseddepartment. 

Exceptional benefits include: major medical, dental, 

vision, life, 401K profit sharing, HEALTH CLUB . 

tuition reimbursement & flex spending. 

Please call Judi 

847-991-4473, ext 215 
h q Fax 847-991-4588 Attn; Judi p r" 





Lakeland Newspapers/ 



MANAGER TRAINEES 



Batteries Plus has great opportunities in our Racine, Lake Zurich, & Lombard stores 
for Manager Trainees. We are looking for responsible individuals that have prior retail 
experience, great customer relation skills, and good technical ability. Must be able 
to lift 50+ lbs, and have a valid dr. license. Paid training provided. Competitive wage 
and benefits. Send/fax resume w/salary requirements to our Corporate HQ, 

attn: Human Resources 

625 Walnut Ridge Drj Suite 106 

Hartland Wl 53029 

fax:(414)369-0682 

or call for an application 

Ph# (414)369-0690 

Indicate the store you are interested in. 

EEO:M/F/V/D 




ACCOUNTING ftt INTERNAL AUDIT PROFESSIONALS 

I On August 1 3, T 997, Fort Jarnes was formed. This was the result of combining two great names in the 
[paper industry, Fort Howard Corporation and James River Corporation. Fort James, an international 
Fortune 200 company, is an industry leader in both commercial and consumer tissue sales with over 
60 manufacturing sites worldwide. These developments have created the following exciting opportu- 
nities to join our Internal Audit Department at our new corporate headquarters in Deerfield, IL AH 
I positions involve approximately 40-50% travel. 

FINANCIAL AND OPERATIONAL INTERNAL AUDITORS (Senior and Staff tevds) 
Requirements : Accounting or Finance degree or equivalent, one to five years progressive audit expe- 
rience (with manufacturing industry preferred). Some positions require professional certification (i.e., 
| CPA, CMA, CIA). MBA a plus. 

SENIOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AUDITOR 

I Requirements : Information Systems degree or equivalent with advanced technical, training, CISA, 
three to five years progressive IT audit experience including multiple hardware platforms, technical 
I systems and application systems. 

Fort James will reward you with a highly competitive compensation and benefits pacbge. For 
immediate consideration, please send/fax your resume along with salary history to: 

FORT JANES CORPORATION 

Attn: John Klimt, Manager of Internal Audit 

P.O. Box 19130 

Green Bay, Wl 54307-9130 

FAX: 920436-3269 

Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V 



FORT JAMES 



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JOB OPPORTUNITIES 

WORKING WITH CHILDREN AND TEENS 

IN YOUR OWN HOME 

DO YOU... 

-enjoy children/teens and the challenges they present? 
ARE YOU... 

-over 21 and experienced with children? 
-interested in making a career working in your own home? 
-interested in using the skills you have learned as a parent to help others? 
-looking for something challenging and different with good income 
potential and tax benefits? 
<VS If you can answer "yes" to these questions or desire more information, 

please contact: 
Barbara Maddex at (847) 356-1021 

Monday-Friday 9:O0am-5 :00pm 

...to learn more about Treatment Foster Care. 
Ongoing training and support will be provided. 

Central Baptist Family Services, a non-profit, licensed and 
accredited child welfare agency, is a leading provider of 
/y\ child protection, foster care and family services 

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FIND YOUR FUTURE WITH 



See what your future holds in store for you at CDW, one of Chicagoland's top companies and a leading 
direct marketer nationwide. We're seeking fast paced and success driven people who want their 
career to be fun. If you enjoy working in a professional yet family-like atmosphere, then CDW is the 
place for you! Career opportunities are currently available for: 



•TELEMARKETERS 

. Full&PartTime 

•-■;.- $10-$12/hr. ■■■■■;■ 

• WAREHOUSE PERSONNEL 

:■ . ^Various Shifts- 
Shipping, Stocking, Receiving, WillCall, Fork Lift Preferred 




CUSTOMER SERVICE 
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR 
SHOWROOM ASSISTANTS 
CIRCULATION ANALYST 



• PC TECHS 

• ACCOUNTANT ■ 

• COLLECTIONS 

• GENERAL OFFICE 

• CREDIT ANALYST 



We offer full time benefits that include major 
medical, dental, vision, life, 401 (k)& profit 
sharing. At CDW, we see great things in store 
for you! For immediate consideration, apply 
in person or mail/fax resume to: 
CDW Computer Centers, Inc., Attn: HR 
Recruiter, 200 N. Milwaukee Ave., Vernon 
Hills, IL 60061. FAX: 847-465-3858. 
www.cdw.com 



• INVENTORY 

3rd Shift, 12:30A-9:00A 



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COMPUTE* 
DISCOUNT 

WAKIHOUS1 



The right price. 
The right advice. 



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/Lakeland Newspapers 



SPRING EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK 



March.13, 1998 



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SECURITY PROFESSIONALS 

A world leader in Protective Services is 
recruiting professional individuals 
throughout the Chicagoland area. 

$ 8.00 to $ 10.00 Starting Wages 

plus vacation & medical benefits 

Interested individuals should contact our 

24 Hour Recruitment Line at 

630-620-0273. 

THE WACKENHUT CORPORATION 

EOE/M/F/D/V 



I ■;■„„ for bu W«iB ,in0 p'.„ u - vacation, 

L tt time P° s ^ p f r ° e r fcrr cd. Paid **5£?ilb* 

benefits pa«ab nexlb lc sew. 

I J akeh^st io ^ 9am -5pn 1 



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Lakehurst M*£K Basic Hno*l «£** and 
™ OT ' *S HVAC systems/ op ua> 1 

basic elcctncity-r 
un itowssappl'^c_ „ jjj ce 

^Monday thru Fr.day 
U am vo 5 pro. ^ 



'Tftodefo Weeded 

For Stylists in Training 

FREE Hair cuts, color, perms, etc. 

Supervised services. 



5101 Washington St. 
Gurnee, IL 

(847) 662-0211 

Call for an 
Appointment 



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Food Service. 
Front Gate 
Games 
Merchandise 



. Rfdes •; 

Park Services 
■ Security 
• Finance 



Great pay. Great benefits. Flexible schedules. For more Information, call us al: M744M046 



Six Flags Great America 

Employment Office 

542 N. Rl. 21 

(Milwaukee Avenue Employee Entrance) 



UI.GREAIAMEWG 



[GREAT AMERICA 

A Tim* Warner EmerUmmoni Company 
EOE; Drug Free Work Pl.iee 



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Hotel 






WHERE YOU'LL FEEL 
LIKE ONE OF THE 
FAMILY! 

Your work is important to our customers, 
the hotel owners', your co-workers. . . and you! 

Be part of our family where you, your 
work AND your worth are recognized. 

So Join Us Now As... 

♦ FRONT DESK CLERK ♦ GENERAL M AINT. 

♦ NIGHT AUDITOR ♦ BUSPERSON 

♦ BELLPERSON/DRIVER ♦ HOUSEKEEPER 

♦GUEST SERVICE MANAGER 



OUTSTANDING BENEFITS 

Competitive Starting Wages ♦ Group Health & Dental 
Paid Vacation & Travel Benefits ♦ 401 (k) & Excellent 
Opportunity for Advancement 




EMBASSY 
SUITES 8 

1445 Lake Cook Road, Deerfield, IL 
Call 847-945-4500 Fax 847-945-8189 



FULL TIME POSITIONS 



Earn GREAT money as an Account Negotiator 

OR 

Public Relations Representative 

(These are NOT telemarketing jobs) 

Positions pay very good salary & negotiators 

. earn additional commissions & bonus 

with EASY potential earnings of $30,000 

or more per year. 

Public Relations position will be the primary 

telephone contact with our clients/customers. 

Excellent office 
environment/working conditions. 

-BENEFITS- 

Health Insurance & Flex Plan 

Retirement Plan 

Paid Holidays 

Paid Vacation 

Paid Sick Time 

Casual Business Attire 

Apply in person or send/fax qualifications to: 

Armor Systems Corporation 

2322 N. Green Bay Rd., Waukegan, IL 60087 
Fax: 847-249-8000 •Phone: 847-249-3000 

Ask for Sharon or Micki 



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March 13, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / C23 



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assirie 



uide 



Notkes - 110 

Lml& Found ..IIS 

Ircc .". 120 

Personals US 

Auctions ...„. 130 

Business Pmorul* ... , , 1 35 

financial « 140 

mfMloyrrient 

Help Wanted Part-Time , 219 

Help Wanted Full-Tlinc : . 220 

Employment Agende* ". 221 

Business Opportuntlei .225' 

Situations Wanlcd 228 

Child Care 240 

School/Instruction '. 2 SO 

Anikiues 301 

Appliances * ' 304 

Barter/Trade ....... . 309 

Bazaars/Crarts : 310 

Building Materials ..314 

Buslncss/OfTice Cojilpmcnt 3 IS 

Llcciionlcs/Compuicrs 320 

Farm Guide 324 

Firewood 328 

Garage/Rummage Sales 330 

Good Things to EM 334 

Horses & Tatt ., 338 

Household Goods/Furniture : 340 

lewelry ,*,, 344 

lanWCartlcn .., .". 346 

Miscellaneous :.... 350 

Medial Equip/Supplies 3S4 

Musical Instruments 3S8 

Pets & Supplies ...". - : 360 

Restaurant Equipment 364 

Tools & Machinery,... -.368 

Wanted To Buy ..370 

Homes Tor Sale 500 

Homes Tof Rent .504 

Homes Wanted I.... ;..... 508 

Homes Builders ,.. .......510 

Condo/Tcrnn Homes SI4 

Mobile Homes 518 

Apailmenli For Ken! . -.520 

ApjilmtnH VVjnied ., , , S14 

Apt/Homes To Share - .528 

Roams For Rent --.■•■ sl ° 

Buildings ■ sii 

Business Properly Tor Sale 534 

Business Property Tor Renl .....538 

Investment Property 540 

Mortgage Services 544 

Farms ,*.... .,' 548 

Vacant Lou/Acreage S60 

Resort sA^catlon Rentals , .....564 

Out of Area Properly , ,.S6i 

Cemetery lots 570 

Real Estate Walned , ; ....574 

Real Estate Mlsc ;...S78 

Recreational \tKklcs 704 

Snownobiles/ATVi '. .-.- .....708 

Boats/Motors/Elc ,710 

Camping 714 

TravdA'jeatwn 718 

Sports Equipment , 720 

Airplanes 724 

ransportatMon 

Cars Tor Sale- ...804 

Rental/Leases ...808 

Classic/Antique Cars ...810 

Service! Parts ...814 

Car loans/Insurance .,,,,,.818 

Vans 824 

rour Wheel Drht/Jtcps 828 

Trucks/Trailers ....834 

Heavy Equipment , 838 

Motorcycles , 844 

Wanted To Buy : ....848 

lec £j^^lrectory 

Appliances Repair 503 

Ulacltop .S06 

Builders S09 

Carpentry SI 2 

Carpet Cleaning... , , SIS 

Concrele/Ccmeni SIS 

Dry Waif S2I 

Educalion/lnst ruction S24 

Electrical .' S27 

rirenood .....S30 

Handyman ....S33 

Heating/Air Conditioning _. S36 

Houselxeping ., ". ........S3? 

Landscaping , ..S42 

Laundry/Cleaning '. S45 

legal Services 548 

Medical Services 551 

Moving/Storage .-. 5S4 

Painting/Decorating 557 

ParaLegal/Typing Services : » S60 

Plumbing 563 

Pools ; 566 

Pressure Washing .......569 

Professional Services , 572 

Radio/TV Repair 575 

Remodeling 578 

Resumes 581 

Roofing/Siding , 584 

Storage 587 

Tan Service S50 

Trees/Plants 593 

Wedding 596 

Miscellaneous S99 




& 



iitrilfution 

Kenosha 
County 






Kenosha 




HOW TO PLACE A 
CLASSIFIED AD 

BY CALL 

PHONE...(847J 223-8161 

n y Lakeland Newspapers 
P X P.O. Box 268 

|.MAIL..Grayslake,IL 60030 



Metra 
Milwaukee 
RR 




t'OOU ClHICH V 



Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in II Newspapers! 

Antioch News • Round Lake News -Lake Villa Record 

Mundelein News • Wadsworth News • Grayslake Times 

Fox Lake Press • Gurnee Press • Lindenhurst News 

Wauconda Leader • Libertyville News 



IN 30 S. Whitney St. 

PERSON... Gra -? slake 



BY FAX...(847) 223-8810 



DEADLINES 

Direct Line .Tues. 5pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party .Wed. 1 0am 

HOURS 

8am-8pm Mon.-Thurs. 

8am-6pm . .' .Friday 



J 








Lakeland 

Newspapers 



no 



Notices 



110 


Notices j 



125 


Personals 



125 



Personals 



125 



Personals 



ERRORS: 

We strive to eliminate 

errors, but if one should 

occur, please report it, 

immediately as WC can 

be responsible for the 

first two (2) weeks only. 

NO ADJUSTMENTS CAN 

BE MADE UNLESS THEY 

AFFECT THE MATERIAL 

VALUE OF AN AD. 



WRITE FOR YOU1 

•X-Mas Cords 

* Wedding Invitations 

•Shower/Party Invitations. 

•Handwritten. 

* Reasonable rats*. ' 

Call (815) 36S-5330. " 



DIET MAGIC 
Lose up to 30lbs. 
30 day programs. 

Start at 530. 
(815)675-9237 
leave message. 



MODELS WANTED 

Fran Wl & IL, between 2-19 to 

compete in this year's 1993 Milwaukee 

Pageants. Over 520.000 in priies and 

scholarships. Including trips to 
Nationals in Us Vegas. Call today. ■ 

1-800-367-2125 EXT2514 



HYPNOTHERAPY 

•Lose Weight 

'Slop Stress 

•Slop Smoking 

•Much-Much More! 

Single or group visits 

available, Learn to relax and 

enjoy your life to its fullest. 

The Center for Habit 

Control. 

David E. Wold . 

Master Hypnotherapist. 

(847)816-4951. 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or appliances, l( 

you aro having a Garage 

Sale or if you have a 

house to soil or apartment 

to rent. 

Call Lisa before 10am 

Wednesday to placo 

your ad here. 

(847)223-8161 

ext. 140. 

PEOPLE THAT CARE Is in 
need of clothing, toys, ap- 
pliances, furniture and other 
household Items, to help 
needy families In Lake County. 
If you wish to make a dona- 
tion, feel free lo call us at (847) 
918-2476 so that we can ar- 
range a time for pickup. Also, if 
you know of somoono who Is 
in need, please call us at (847) 
918-2476. 



ROUND LAKE 

HIGH SCHOOL 

CLASS OF 1988 

10 Years Is almost up!! 

It's noaring reunion timc.but 

we need some help wilh 

addresses. Please help us 

and spread tho word!) 

Send your name (including 

maiden name), your address 

and friend's addresses and 

phone numbers lo: 

RLHS Cfass of 'B8 

Reunion Committee 

c/o Cindy ( Vol ling) Blue, 

1415 Coral Reef Way, 

Lake Zurich, HI. 60047. 



HEALTHY WOMEN 

oasisiDsn) 

Excellent Compensation 
Healthy women 33 <ind under 
and with a history of previous 
pregnancy needed lo serve a 
anonymous egg donors. Donors 
will be required to lake medica- 
tion, blood screening and under- 
go minor surgical procedure. 
Substantial compensation will 
be given. If interested call ASR, 
773-327.73! S. 
Striotn inquiries only. 



100 PEOPLE NEEDEDI 

WE PAY YOU 

TO LOSE WEIGHT1 

Dr. Recommended! 

Guaranteed! 

(847) 497-9690. 



ADOPT: GIVE YOUR baby 
the bo-" life has to offer - a 
home filled with love, happi- 
ness and financial security. Ex- 
penses paid. Cheryl and An- 
thony 1 -eOQ-370-4369. 

ADOPTION 
ACTIVE, FUNLOVING 

mom, dad and big brother-to- 
be enjoy an exciting life . 
together filled with love, 
affection, fun and good times. 
May we have the honor of 
sharing our lively, cheerful 
home with your precious 

baby? 

EILEEN AND JIM 

1-800-510-7334. 



Former Extension Advisor 
1972-1990 

(Rbdhdaq, on MancA 22, 1998. 

Her family wishes to honor her 

wilh a card shower and invites 

friends to send their good wishes lo: 

Irene Green 

635 Knolwood Dr. 

ML Airy, N.C. 27030 





115 



Lost & Found 



DID YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8161. 



120 



Free 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed dJissi/lcrt 
flilverllslrig with (lie Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive a misleading statement 
from another firm request- 
ing payment for this advertis- 
ing. To receive proper cred- 
it to your account, nil pay. 
incuts for your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as invoiced 
unci directed to: 

Likeland Newspapers 

PO Box 208 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayikke. IL 60030-0268 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more information, 
please contact the Humane 
Sociely. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad in tho 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
"and Giveaways aro run at NO 
CHARGE! (Wo discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays, (847) 

223-8161, oxt.140. 



PIace Your ClASsifitd 

Ad Here. 

CaII Travjs or DarrvI. 

847.225.SI 61 



ADOPTION IS A LOVING 
OPTION. Imagine a husband 
and wife who believe FAMI- 
LY IS PRIORITY, who 
promise you their love for your 
baby will always be endless 
and unconditional. ..a warm, 
secure environment overflow- 
ing wilh hugs, happiness and 
laughter. Stay at home mom 
and dad with flexible schedule 
can provide tho life you want 
for your baby. Medical, legal, 
counseling and court ap- 
proved expenses paid. Confi- 
dential. Please call our at- 
torney at (708) 957-6832. 

ALL THE LOVE a baby will 
ever want with a devoted fi- 
nancially secure couplo. 
Maybe we can help each oth- 
er. Call Sandi/Bob 800-750- 
2629 Code 1 8. 



LOOK GREAT! 
LOSE WEIGHT! 
MAKE MONEY! 
(647) 940-9689. 



NEVER FAIL NOVENA May 
the Sacred Heart of Jesus be 
praised, adored and glorified 
throughout the whole world 
now and forever. Most Sacred 
Heart of Jesus, I put my trust in 
You. Holy Mary, Mother of Je- 
sus, pray for me. St. Theresa, 
Child of Jesus, pray for me. St. 
Jude, Helper of Hopeless 
Cases, pray for me and grant 
me this favor 1 ask. Say this 
prayer nine limes a day for 
nine days and publish. D.M.B. 

SELECT-A-MEAL 

REDUCING DIET 

S5.00 SASE: P. O. Box 1201, 

Belvedere. 111. 61008-1201. 

THE SOLUTION TO 
YOUR NEW YEARS 

RESOLUTION!! 

LOSE WEIGHT the 

HEALTHY way-We DID! 

30 day SSS-back 

guarantee. 

Natural! 

Dr. Recommended! 

Call Melody 

(847) 548-4191 

Independent 

Herballfe 

DISTRIBUTOR. 



140 



Financial 



BUILD A NEW HOME - Fi- 
nancing available, flexible 
credit, as little as $1500 down 
if qualified, customer manag- 
es. building project. DeGeorge 
Home Alliance 1-800-343- 
2864. _ 

READY MONEY FOR your 
structured settlement, lottery 
winnings, trust income and 
real estate notes. Also, life in- 
surance viatication. READY 
MONEY .CAPITAL 1-888- 
READY-42. 



y HOBALVfUMM 
And Cower 

Dntdni SyvMflL 

'K. BuckmanMD. 

Wc provide consultants 8c best 

quality. Private label k 

bulk sales avail. 
Distributors welcome. 

688-366-4470. 

wvmrebanet.com /£ \ 





sw oww 



=> 



140 


Financial 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



"FAST LOANS** HOME- 
OWNERS S20.000-S1 00,000 
cash for any reason. Consoli- 
date bills, 125% of home's val- 
ue No equity needed. Simple 
phone application. Nothing out 
of pocket. No obligation. Don't 
delay. IMCC Financial is an Illi- 
nois Residential Mortgage Li- 
censee. 1-800-948-0514. 



BANKRUPTCY $79+ E-Z 

file system stops creditors/gar- 
nishments. Guaranteed valid. 
Ends debt/credit card slavery. 
Divorce $129+. Fast, cour- 
teous service. FroshStart 
America 1-88B-395-8030 toll 
free. 



Part Time 

DENTAL 
ASSISTANT 

20-30 his. per week 

- MON-THURS 

Busy, fun, 

orthodontic group 

needs enthusiastic 

assistants looking for 

a rewarding career 
w/ great potential for 

persona] & 
professional growth. 

847-223-2876 I 
847-838-0105 

' • '"" ' "^ ■ • T i Hnr i i i mill 




C24 / Lakeland Newspapers 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



HELP WANTED 
PBRTTMBB 

BBRTBODBR 

CALL 
(847) 587-7020 



sssssssssssssssssss 



PERSONAL 
HOUSEKEEPERS 

Perm, part-time. Earn 

$8-10+/Hr. Mornings 

and/or afternoons. 

Adv. Opp. 

Car/Vac req. 

(847) 361-8771 or 

(847)487-8771 



Discovery Toys needs 
6-8 educational consultants 
tor Lake County. If you 
enjoy children and want to 
educate parents, this home 
based business Is for you. 
Excellent for teachers, stay 
at home moms and even 
dads. , 

Call Km tine Knutson 
847.680.6458 



sssssssssssssssssss 



PIace Your CkssifiEcl 


Ad Here. 


CaII Travis or DarrvI. 


847.225.8161 



i m i mii 






I 



Call or Apply at: 

131 McKinley 
Lake Villa, IL 

600M6 



Substitute 
Teachers 

Long term - 
position available 

(847)356-2118 

Ask for Mr. Eiduke 



E£Sk3| 



Telemarketers Wanted" 
Earn minimum $10 per hour!! 

We are looking for outgoing individuals who 

are interested in making money! 

Outbound sales calls. Monday through Thursday 

late afternoons and evenings. Base rate plus 

generous commissions. Experience is a plus! 

Call Sue for more information 

and to set up an interview. 



(84?KM<'M(pJj 



— > 



TALK IS NOT CHEAP AT 
LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS! 

Slau&e, Mama, Wxuded 

Do you need some extra cash 

and a few hours on your own? For an 

opportunity to earn generous hourly 

wage and commission with flexible 

hours, contact Lakeland Newspapers. 

We have several positions available in 

our telemarketing department. 

OxM Mawieen at 

to- &dL up, cut Uit&wicw. 



EM 



«-.- ' 



r4 



BROADCASTING 
RECORDING ENGINEER, 

No experience required, on- 
the-job training in local 
Recording Studios, Radio/TV 
Stations. PT, Nights, Wee- 
kends. Free video, CD Rom 1- 
800-345-0112. 

CALLING ALL LAKE 
COUNTY MOMSI1I Bright 
Beginnings Family Day Care 
Network is looking for nurtur- 
ing, responsible, creative Indi- 
viduals who would like to start 
their own business whilo slay- 
ing home with their children. II 
you live in Lake Villa, Linden- 
hursl, Gurneo, Grayslako or 
Round Lake and would like as- ■ 
sistance In getting licensed, 
ongoing technical assistance, 
and child referrals, this pro- 
gram is for you, For more infor- 
mation on how to become a 
quality infant and toddler day 
care provider in your home, 
call Dena Thompson (847) 
356-4112. 

DRIVE TO OWN II Class A 
CDL. SO down/eoc all miles. 
Avg. 10.000* miles/month. 
Company drivers; Newer 
Equipment; Competitive 

Pay/Benefits. New Apple Lines 
B00-643-830a. 800-643-3384. 

DRIVER • EARN up to 
S800/woek your first year witn 
USA TRUCKI Laie mode) con- 
ventional with satellite, no slip 
seating, weekly pay. 800-237- 
4642. EOE. M/F/H/V- 

DRIVER OTR COVENANT 
TRANSPORT West Coast 
Runs. S1O00 sign-on bonus 
for experienced drivers. 
Healih/Lile Insurance avail- 
able first day on truck. Experi- 
enced drivers t -800-441- 
4394 Graduate studenis 1- 
800-338-6428 Bud Meyer Re- 
frigeralod Truck Lines 1-888- 
667-3729. 

DRIVER: 100% NO- 
TOUCH freight. Great 
Pay/Benelits. Regional or 
OTR. 23 with CDL-A, Haz-Mat. 
6-monihs experience. Start 
immediately! 0/0's Welcome! 
LANDSTAR/POOLE 8B8- 
662-5037. 

DRIVER: UP TO S700/weck 
orientation pay tip to 35e/milc 
to starl. Great homelimo. As- 
signed, all conventional lloet. 
O/Os welcome. BOYD BROS. 
800-5-13-8923. EOE. 



DRIVERS • HEW 1998 PAY 

PACKAGE Arctic Express is 
seeking company/regional & 
OTR tractor-trailer drivers. 
Class A CDL w/hazmal and 1 
year OTR driving required. 
Call Dave or Lisa at 800-927- • 
0431. EOE. 

DRIVERS REGIONAL 

RUNS! HOME WEEKLY! 32c 
to 42c PER MILE! Call today 
and drive tor us tomorrow. 1 
yr. OTR experience required. 
BURLINGTON MOTOR CAR- 
RIERS. 800-564-6262. 

DRIVERS'OTR-CRST 
OFFERS TUITION-FREE 

training and a guaranteed job. 
NO EXPERIENCE NECES- 
SARY! Earn up lo $30,000 first 
year. Mm. Age 21, no lelonios. 
Call CRST 1-800-504-2770. 
EOE/mi. 

DRIVERS: COMPANY 

DRIVERS/OWHER ops. 

S500-S1000 Sign-on bonus. 

Van. ilatbed. dedicated sin- 
gles or teams. No experience? 
No problem. Training avail- 
able. Builders Transport. 1- 
888-2JOIN.BT. 



TEErUatCERJ & COLLEGE 









Do you have a sales background? 
Do you like talking on the phone? 
This is an opportunity to contin- 
ue using your skills, No physical 
work. 
We offer flexible hours, 
generous hourly wage & 
commission at 
Lakeland Newspapers. 

CALL MAUREEN AT 
(847) 223-81^1 

EXT. 109 




CLASSIFIED 



March 13, 1998 




523 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



EEffl 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wonted 
Full-Timc 



PET CAREI ENERGETIC 
dependable person, various 
duties involving pets. Must bo 
flexible and available 7 
days/week Including wee- 
kends and holidays, Call only 
between 10am-5pm, Monday- 
Friday. Shol-Ray Pol Shalot 
f414l 857-2163. 

FULL/PART-TIME. Tho 

Pampered Chef is looking for 
kilchen consulianls. Bonuses, 
excellent hourly pay, flexible 
hours. Local training, person- 
al attention. Call Julio (047) 

918-1550, 

WANTED FLATBED DRIV- 
ERS. S1000 SIGN-ON BO- 
NUSI Up 10 S0.30-0.31/mi. 
Medical lilo. 40 IK, homo time 
Class A CDL, lyr. OTR. 
PFT/Roberson 1-000-237- 
0548. EOE/ml. 



L1CEHSEI2..LIFE & HEAUH. 
A £ E £|j_N£EBEI2 i _auollty pro- 
ducts, high commissions with 
advance boforo Issuo and 
benefits. (Must qualify far ad- 
vances & bonofits) Coll; 1-800- 
252-2501. 

JOB OPENINGS FOR H.S. 
diploma grads, 17-34 years 
old. No oxpoflonco nccossary. 
Will train In oloctronlcs. nvfa- 
Hon mechanics and other 
lieids. Paid relocation. Call to- 
day, 1-800-469-6209. 

mm mi \ 

Start $l4.067lir. plus benefits. For 

exam and application info. Call 

B0O-230-9769exML195 

Bam- 10pm, 7 days. 



r 



TWELVE MONTH RECEPTIONIST 
ALMOND ROAD CAMPUS 

Please send letter of interest/ rosumo by March 27, 199B to: 

Mr. Ron Shollon, Associate Principal 

Warren Township High School 

34090 Almond Road 

Gurnce, IL 60031 




H AVil 



SSTTfJiWcCirtiDfJlK/ 



Do you want to have; 
UN IN YOUR JOB* 

with management that 
actually listens to VOU tl 
KJs liatcry is looking for people 
who like to have fun at tbeir ■ ' 
job while they wor£ 
Looking for: " 

• Hosts' 
• Waitslaff also 
IVT Beach Volleyball 
lguc Coordinator 



(SAILIL ©&VE &Y 




How To 

Survive 

'The Job 

Search 

Bv Ntuicv Sakol 



4t 



EARN EXTRA MONEY 

Work one weekend a month 
and tv/o weeks a year and re- 
ceive 100% college tuition, 
the Montgomery G.I. Bill and 
an excellent paycheck.You 
may also quality tor a cash en- 
listment bonus. Call your local 
National Guard representative 
today at 1-B00-OK-GUARD. 

EASY WORKI 
NO EXPERIENCE 

S500-S1.000 pan-time at 

home stuffing envelopes. 

For tree information send 

sett-addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
tngleside. III. 60041. 

HIRING EXPERIENCED & 
INEXPERIENCED DRIV- 

ERS! Training & Trainee Pay 
Available. Regional, OTR, 
Dedicated Runs. Excellent 
Pay and Benefits. Assigned 
Equipment. Swift Transporta- 
tion. 1-800-331-7221 (eoe- 
m/f) 



Dear Search™, 

I am writing litis k'tiur following ah Interview I have jusi returned 
Irnm. I have been interviewing fur the p;isl iwu months for various 
positions Ihiii I have called on through the newspaper, and have not 
been fortunate enough as yet to come across the one position that I 
feel I am suited for. Willie in lite midst of interviewing, I have found 
on several occasions t am faced with miestiom at the end of the 
Interview thai have left me either longue-tied, or babbling an answer 
out in hopes that I have said the nghi'lhing that the interviewer 
wants to Rear. The question: "Do you have any queslionsr. I hope 
tli. ii you ran tell me if there are certain questions when asked (his, 
that you do or do not want to ask the interviewer. lltank you for your 
help. 

IX - lake Villa 
Dear L K., 

First, it always helps lo do research on a company, whether it he 
through your local library, chamber ol commerce, Internet, or 
through people who you may come across that have been or are cur- 
rently employed through the company. The more you can find out 
about a company's line of business, the more apt you are to feel 
comlnrtalile about the interview. 1 say this lo yon because after all, 
one .question you never want in ask is, "What docs vnur company 



do? 



When or if the qiicslinn. 'Do you have any questions?" is posed to 

SSMSfSS W,y i N . )! l,ul J. 11 ' slHt: l,,! " lhe questions you are about to 

ask are educated ones, I or Instance, Never ask... "flow many vaca- 

i nanU sick days does your company offer per year??, as this will 

Sfi&u&r l " &' ,,,al *? is " ,0 nw,sl Important thing on 
jour mind, is how much time you WONT have to work. 

rn&r n8 ic < ^ \\ mm ^ "to a person in litis position lo he pro- 
v -, , „;, , r 1 ' 1 ,T qucM fc n \ ha ' wm,l(l ™rt« N "-"em as though 
you nave in and it means possibilities in the future. 

SSSS uSfe'JS aft* *• ' s,;,r,r - niis «*■ & **ti .« 

siarui^ salary? .Always wall unlit an offer has been made. 

^ d !ft«SW^ ^ ,U ' ^ aV1 ' lU>w m ™ ]m - 

liecomeramilia w ?^ Snff Wty* f[ ! r - ''^'^ V»« have 
or are accm HSV2SKS«!!4 UC1 ^^ ^mmiufactiire, 
Qt.estionV'K'S a hi mo ^Jfc^W^ P™^ 
always been based out » n, l\ r -w i " ' f ff* """l^^y 
reporting directly tbT 11 uS'Si W ,D V" uld ,hib J H,silU "' & 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU-Tlme 



Enginoorlno 



PRO-ENGINEER 

Duo to our rapW growiofl no. of con- 

1/ocl & por m oppty's In moch. Design, 

Sloflnfj Starting to sccWng Pro-E 

drafters, dotaitort. dosigrwrsi 

coglncort tor MW iutM. 

7OB-562-4400 Xl6o bt 708-562-5321 



rrByvv.1 iv^a 



Restaurant 

FINE.DINING WAIT STAFF 

FT/PT, Lunch & Dinner 

; Shifts Avail. Apply In person : 

to Ted: 

The Country Squire 

Rostaurant 

Rt. 120 & 45 -Grayslako 

847-2230121 



DRIVERS 

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS 

$xooo Hiring Bonus (Mutt stay on job' 90 days) 

Our Drivers average S40K+ yearly! Luciano needs: 

TRACTOR/TRAILER DRIVERS. Must have 

at lcasl 1 yr tractor/irailcr cxp & a good working & 

safe'" record. Single Drivers usually home 

every 10-12 days. Wc offer: 

•Xt - 29C per mile (single) 

•$ZO Tier delivery (after 1st) 

• Layc 'er & break-down pay 

•Group lit h/1 ire/disability ins. 

•Paid Hldys & vacations 

• 40i(k> retirement plans 

• Assigned conventional^ 

• Rider program 

•Weekly payroll 

• Credit Union 

Get Home Often! We have brand new 

. Volvo Condos lo fill! Call 

Luciano Refrigerated Transport 

800*753*8X65 



Service 
Representative 



HE A BRIGHT SPOT AT ALLSTATE... You'll be happy to know 
lhal Allstate Lite Insurance in Vernon Hills, Is seeking, 
amblllous Individuals for several opcnlnrjs In our Life 
Service dcpartmcnL 

In Ibis position you will provide assistance on phone" 
Inquiries, resolve problems and provide technical 
assistance to oilier unit members and Interact with policy 
holders. You should be a people orlcnled person with 
excellent communication and Cnftllsli grammar skill*. 
Good spelling and math skiffs ure essential. General 
kcyboard/CKT skills and a' tram player attitude. arc also 
needed. Knowledge of Life Insurance products a definite 
plus. 

Wc offer a broad range of benefits Including Llfe/Mcdlcal/ 
Dental plans. Tension fir I'rofit Sharing and competitive 
salary. For consideration, please FAX(847.247-7I70) or 
malt resume to; llulnan Resources Department, Allstate 
Life Service Center, FO Box 
94213, Palatine, IL 60094- 
9954 



Allstate Is an 
tqujl Opportunity Cmplo)cr 



/instate 

You're in good hands. 



SUBSTITUTE 
DIRECTORY 

The following schools need 

substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact the 

names listed below for further information, 

Aptakisic - Tripp School District #102 

1231 Weiland Rd, Buffalo Grow, IL 60089 

Contact: Laurel Karotczak (847) 634-5338 

Beach Park School Dist #3 

1 1315 W. U'adsworth Rd., Zion, II. 60099 

Contact: Karen (847) 623-9300 

Diamond Lake School District #76 
25807 Diamond Uke Road, Mundclrin, II.6OO6O 

Contact: Ellen Maucr (847) 566-6601 

Grayslakc School District #46 
450 N. Hanon Blvd., Grayslakc. 11.60030 

Contact: Jan Fabry. (847) 223-3650 xl 100 

Grass Lake School District #36 
26177 W. Gratf Like Road, Antloch. 11.60002 

Contact: Pal Keed or Sue (847) 395-1550 

Hawthorn School District 73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon Hills, H.6OO61 

Contact: Mary Tell j (847) 367-3279 

Lake Villa School District #41 
131 McKinley, Lake Villa. IL, 60046 

Contact: Kathy (847) 356-2385 

Round Like Area Schools 

316 S. Rosedalu Cl., Round Lake, IL 60073 

Contact: Maureen (847) 546-5522 x 3010 

Wiitthrop Harbor Schools 

2309 9lli Street, Wimhrop Harbor, 11. 6OO96 

Contact: Dr. Bud Marks (8-17) 746-1471 

Zion Elementary School Dlsl. #6 

2200 Ifctnesda Blvd., Zion, 11,60099 

Contact: Karen (847) 872-5455 



y . 



March 13, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers / 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DISPLAY 

ADVERTISING 

SALES 

Flexible Hours 

Do you like meeting 
new people? 

Do you like solving 
problems? 

Do you provide good 
customer service? 

If this is you, we 

would like to hear 

from you. 

Unleash your 

earning potential 

with this growth 

driven publisher. 

Call 

847.223.81 61 

ext. 113 

or fax your 

resume to 

Vince Saputo 

at 847-223-8810 

TODAY! 

GROUP HEALTH 

BENEFITS, 401 K 

& MORE! 



Payroll 

At Quill, we're now one of 
the leading direct marketers 
of business products. This 
kind of success doesn't hap- 
pen without incredible atten- 
tion to our customer's 
need.s That's why we're 
looking for people like you 
People with talent, ambition, 
and the desire to be the 
best. 

We are now seeking a: 

Payroll 
Processor 

As a member of Payroll 
Team, you'll share the fol- 
lowing responsibilities: 

• Processing a weekly payroll 
lor 1200* employees in 
multiple locations 

• Updabng emplcYQo intarrraion 
and pay records 

■ Selling up and maintaining 
direct deposit accounts 

• Editing information on a 
automated timekeeping 
system 

•GarnshmerjMage a s si gnrnent 
processing 

We require a high school 
diploma with 2+ years, of 
hands-on experience in 
above responsibility areas. 
ADP payroll experience a 
plus. PC/data entry skills are 
essential. 

We offer a competitive 
salary, excellent benefits 
package, which includes 
tuition reimbursement, profit 
and gain sharing, and 
complete training to help 
you achieve your career 
goals, Please forward all 
inquiries with salary require 
ments to: Quill Corporation 
100 Schelter Road, Dept. 
KL/AH, Lincolnshire, IL 
60069. Or fax to: (847)634 
5620, No phone calls 
please, 

Equal Opportunity 
Employer M/F/D/V. 




c&mroHATion 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Tlmc 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



-Help Wanted 
Full-Tlmc 



220 



Help Wanted 
• Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-llmc 



220 



Help Warned 
Full-Time . 



[linking 

Junior Lender 

Great opportunity with 

growing community 

bank. Fax resume to 

Loan Dcpt. '"■ 

(847) 548-2699 



PHOTO 
TECHNICIAN 

Immed Opening-Madison, Wl. 
r/T avail for cap Photo Finishing 
Film Tech at comm'l phold lab. 

. Incl bnfis. Send letter of' 
appl/resumc*. Personnel Director, 
Burnc Color Labs, Ltd, 4289 W, 

Bcltlinc Hwy, Madison, Wl. 
5371 1; e-mail pal©burne.com 




MEDICAL OFFICE 

Great position for 
experienced A/R 
billing specialist with 
computer experience 
nice non-smoking 
environment. No 

evenings or 

weekends. Benefits 

available. 

Fax resume to 

847-234-6843 

or 

Call 

847-234-4985 

To Join Our Team 



VACATION 
VILLAGE 

Now accepting 
applications, for 
full & part time 

LIFEGUARDS 

Must be certified. 

Apply in person 

between I0am-4pm, 

Mon - Fri 

State Park Rd. 

Fox Lake, IL 

DRUG FREE 

WORKPLACE 



%A* 



_p 



■The Wildest Concept in Gurneewith, 
the Hottest Pay in Townl 

RAINFOREJT CAF 
NOW HIRING 

•Retail Sales People 

Earn the highest hourly wage in the area! 

•Experienced Servers 

Earn the best tips around! 

'■ Along with great pay, our Wild staff enjoys medical and dental ^£ 

benefits for full-time, 401 (k), employee stock purchase plan and a< 

the chance to be part of the wildest thing in Gurnee 

Apply in person daily! 

GURNEE MILLS 

6170 W. Grand Avenue 

www.rainforestcafe.com 

^l <S® (^ IS A WW Place to Shop and Eal 'EOE 





** A 




gnaaauaMawBBaaflaaaanant— maaa 



i 



PTs, OTs 
CODAs & PTAs 

Wanted for Illinois, 
S Wisconsin & 
| Indiana area. Mayo 
| Referral Services 
j 800-300-1332 



QMRP 

Immediate full time posi- 
tion available in our Lake 
Zurich Intermediate 
Care Facility. Will be 
responsible for planning, 
developing, implement- 
ing and supervising 
case management activ- 
ities for MR/DD women. 
Bachelors Degree and 
one year experience 
with MR/DD population 
required. 

Contact Gall Becker 

Mount Saint Joseph. 

Lake Zurich 

847-438-5050 



miiltunriiiiiiiinmum 

PHYSICAL THERAPIST 

Immed Openings. Our 

expanding medical facility 

seeks Individuals interested 

in F/T, Physical Therapist & 

Physical Therapist Assts. 

We specialize in 

on hopaedic/Occ u pational 

therapy w/opptys to develop 

advance ergonomic in 

hydro therapy programs. 

Resume: Physicians 

Immediate Care, 3475 S. 

Alpine Rd., Rocktord, IL 

61 109; 81 5-874-BOOO X 833 

i>iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!ir:iiiiti 




PARAMEDIC/ 
EMT's 

Immed Openings-Kansas 

City, MO. Emergency 
Providers, Inc. Contracted 
provider of ambulance ser- 
vices for Kansas City, Mast. 
System, accepting apps 
from Paramedics & EMTs 
w/following credentials: Nat'l j 
Registry, Missouri EMS Lie, j 
BCLS. BTLS or PHTLS, 
ACLS, PALS In medic HR, 
6740"Eastwood Trafficway, 
Kansas City, MO 64129; 

816-924-2500. 
Affirmative Action/EOE 

eMMMMtMMMMnnri 



CLINICAL 

PHARMACY 

COORD. 

Immed Opening-Kansas, 

Stormont-Vail Regional 

Healthcare seeks exp Irtdiv. 

to lead clinical activities for 

the organization. Will be 

resp. for clinical goals & 

developing & maintaining 

MUIs& DUEs. You will act 

as llason to the Pharmacy 

& Therapeutics Committee 

of the Med Staff &Sr 

Diagnostic Svcs. They will 

be resp. for preparing all the 

material needed for the 

P&T meelings. The 

Coordinator will provide 

pharmaceutical education 

for the Mod Staff & 
Residents as well as pre- 
pare the Staff for the transi- 
tion to pharmaceutical care. 
Must have Pnarm D Dog. & 
have completed a residen- 
cy, 2yrs exp, exc 
written/verbal skills, previ- 
ous exp In staff developmt 

prel'd. Stormont-Vail 
Regional Healthcare Clr is 
a 506 bed acute care refer- 
ral ctr for NE Kansas.' 
Stormonl oilers comp sal 
schedule & exc bnfts. 
Resume: Susan Thompson, 
HR, 1500 SW 10th, Topeka, 
KS 66604; *' 
800-432-2951x6153 

tf»»Y»W¥»¥Y¥»y»»» 



f DIRECT^ 
. CARE 

Direct Care Workers for 

MR/DD women jn 

residential setting. All 

shifts available. Full 

Time or Part Time. We 

arc committed to quality 

residential care. 

Contact 

Gail Becker 

Mount Saint 

Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

847-438-5050 



Healthcare 

CNA'S 

Part Time Days & 
Weekend hours 

You've tripd the rest, now 
try working with the best! 
Our highly competent staff 
is looking for more team 
members. Wc arc a 108 bed, 
skilled nursing facility in 
the far NW suburbs. Wc pay 
for your expertise. Starting 
salary at $9.00/hr plus 
Sl.OG/hr differentials. 
Please call 847-526-5551, 
Ask Tor Jean or Alonn 

Care Centre of 

Wanconda 

176 Thomas Court 
Wauconda, I L 60084 



: MEDICAL OFFICE I 
: OPPORTUNITIES : 

• LAKELAND MANAGEMENT > 
; SERVICES is a physician prac- ; 
I lice management organization I 

I affiliated with Highland Park * 

• Hospital. Currenlly. wo arc seek- * 
; ing dynamic individuals to join S 

I our learn! 

• ; 

% POTENT COORDINATORS j 

J Positions aio available in our ; 
: DEERF1ELO, UBEnTWILLE • 

• snd MUNDELEIN locations. ; 
j Medical office exper ionco is pre- i 
i toned, but wo will train customer I 

• sorvico oriented individuals with ■ 
j some computer skills. 

! MEDICAL FLOATERS 

• Requires Medical Assistant • 

• experience with phlebotomy j 
t skills, and an aptitude to learn ! 
■ Iron) office procedures. Both full ■ 

• and part time positions are avail- J 
; able for those who enjoy variety) 1 

• S 
S Wo ollor excellent compensation • 

• including a full bonotit package. ; 
J Forward resume lo: HR S 
! Coordinator, LAKELAND MAN- 1 
' ACEMENT SERVICES, 009 • 
; Park Ave. Wast, Highland Park,; 
: IL 60035. Fax: 847-433-9809. I 

(coo) : 



RH/LPN's 
FT/FT 3-11 Shift 

Our 108 bed skilled, pro- 
gressive nursing home is 
looking for a nurse to add lo 
our team of professionals. 
We offer many educational 
& advancement opportuni- 
ties, tuition reimbursement, 
and an excellent 
salary/benefit pkg. 
Call Jean or Alona at 

Care Centre of 
Wauconda 

1 76 Thomas Ct. 
Wauconda. IL 60084 

PH 847/526-5551 
FAX 847/526-0007 



I Food Service 

SERVER 

JWe have an excellent 
^opportunity in the 
jMcHcnry area for a 
(Server to work the 2nd- 
jshift. Great pay and ben- 
Sefils along with advance- 
>mcnl opportunities. Call 
ICindy at 815-385-7000 
5ext. 2347. A.H. Vending 
i& Food Service. Drug 
^screening required. EOE. 



Manufacturing 

Roxam Medical Packaging, a 
loading manufacturer of high 
quality, flexible packaging, has 

the following 3rd shift position 
available tor: 

Press Helper 

Qualified applicants must have 
good malh and reading skills, bo 
able to read a ruler up to t/32 of 
an inch and !~.avo some under- 
standing of basic Pansophic sys- 
tem. Responsibilities include 
assisting pressman in the opera- 
tion ol presses, performing gen- 
eral job preparation, prepare 
carton Inks, retrieve cylinders, 
pick supplies, etc., and perform 
general department housekeep- 
ing. Good mechanical and tech- 
nical aptitude a plus. 

Rexam offers challenges and 
growth potential along with an 
excellent starting salary, out- 
standing benefits and a pleasant 
work environment. Apply In per- 
son Monday thru Friday between 
8:00 am and 4:30 pm at 

R^AMMEDrULPACKAGnG 

1919 S.Butteffleld Rood 

MmdetelrUeWSQ 

EEO/AA 



Marutactung 

TOOL 
ASSEMBLERS 

PasJode is an mnovsrvs manufacturer of 
advanced power fastening systems far the 
construction and industrial markets 
Recognized as the pioneer and technical 
leader of advanced cordlets tools tar na!$ 
and staples, we continue lo enjoy e*cep- 
tjonal growth in these product taies. 

Our taoiity it Green Oaks {near Lambs 
Farm in Ubertyvie) has been completed 
and we are seeking tool assemblers to 
Iworfc in our team-oriented envronment 
Fofkwng a mutt-step interview process, 
successful candidates wi be schedules to 
start in May. 

i Candidates wilt assemble toots am) 
; inspect al sub nd final assemblies, test 
and box loots; manage inventory compo- 
nent parts and reorder as requred, assist 
n settng. implementing and evaluating 
team goals 
Ideal team members should be able to 
operate air and hand tods. Ml up to tubs. 
frequently and 40 fas. cccasionafy, team 
to read basic blue prints, pertxm base 
math calculations, read assembly instruc- 
tions, comrnunicate effectively with team, 
members and nave 13 years ot wort 
enperience. 

Pasfade otters an excellent benefits pack- 
age and competitive wages For immediate 
consideration, please send your resume ; 
to. Pastode, Ann: Human Resources-GO. 
I382S West Business Center Drive • Urnt 
A Lake Forest, IL G0045. Fa«es can be 
sent to W7-M97414 or candtdates can 
apply m person between Sam. -4pm 
Moa-Fn. An Equal Opportunity Employer. 




Paslode 



Banking 

Mortgage Originator 
looking for an edge? 
Source Single Family 
Residential mortgages 
in Lake County in a 
■unique new niche. 

Salary + high 

incentive potential. 

Fax Resume to 

Spawn & Assoc. 

(847)604-5182 



Full Time 

SECRETARY 

Self motivated 

person to run a 

multi-task office 

and answer phone. 

Knowledge of 

Excel and 
Word a must. 

847-680-1800 



Accounting 

TRAVEL CENTERS 
OF AMERICA 

A fla-icnal Recognized Leader Serving fie 
Traveling (onvinoj Put* & Trick DrwrsAl 
Over 120 Oasis Sr/fe/Mutt-taceted loca- 
tions {comprised of restaurants, a 
retatoortniense store, gasAteset station, 
trucUauto parts store & Truck Oner 
AfciaBusness Management Office}. Is 
seeking the foeowtng employees for our 
location in ftusseJ, It (on f-94 & RusseS 
RdnrWl border) 

•600KEEPERS 
•ACCOUKTW3 CLERKS 
FuD A Part Time 
Good administrative capacities S cash 
handling raperience preferred, tut wi Iran 
VVe orler eseflenl advancement orjportuni 
ties far top performers 4 company paid ben- 
efits ncuding medical, prescription drugs, 
denial. Me, short term ofcatAty, 40tK pto, 
edurjatJoatufon assistance programs £ 
meaf/m-store cSscourtts. fte-empfaymeni 
drug screening reoured. 

Interested Iqum tied? 

We irani to hear from you! 

PLEASE APPLY IN PERSON 

TRAVEL CENTERS OF AMERICA 

MM & Russell Road 

Russell, IL 60075 

EOE 



Lake County 

Forest Preserve 

District 

IABOUKfL, fOX RIVER, 
HARRINGTON, IL 

Seasonal positions (apprax. 40 
hrSvVrk) March- Oct o&er , to main- 

Iiain presetvo grounds and laak- 
•ws. Perform activities related to 
storago (boots and RVs), camp- 
ground and marina operations. 
Operate machinery (i.e. mowers, 
tractors, pumps and pump power 
equipment used in grounds and 
building maintenance) and assist 

in preventive maintenance of 

such equipment (i.e. oil changes. 

grease equipment, and minor 

repairs). Basic knowledge of 

grounds maintenance, motorized 

equipment (i.e. front end loader, 

farm tractors, riding mowers) and 

vehicles desirable. $7.00- 

$9.50/nour. Applications are 

available at and must be returned 

to the Lake County Forest 

Preserve District, Human 

Resource Office, 2000 N. 

Milwaukee Ave., Ubertyville, IL 

60048. 647/367-6640. 



1 



»ummiii i imiiiiiii i wnmigw mn "m»'"»i"'»'"' M 

AVAILABLE NOW!! 

Sr. Admin. Asst. to $32K 

Admin. Asst. to S28K 

Customer Service to S25K 

Accounts Payable to $23K 

Reception to S20K 

Data Entry S18 - $20K 




upenor 

Personnel 



(847) 244-0016 



POLICE OFFICER 



The Board ot Fire and Police Commissioners will conduct 

Examinations for the appointment of Police Officers in the 

Village of Fox Lake. All applicants will be governed by the 

Rules and Regulations of the Board of Commissioners. 

Application forms may be obtained at the Fox Lake Village 

Hall, between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:00 pm, at 301 South 

Route 59, Fox Lake, Illinois. There is a non-refundable S25.00 

application fee. 

QUALIFICATIONS 

1. Applicants must be a U.S. Citizen 

2. Must have a High School Diploma or its equivalent 

3. Must be between 21 and 35 years of age. 

Mandatory Orientation will be held at the Village Hall on 
Saturday April 4, 1998 at 10:00 am. Testing will be held April 9, 

1998 at 7:00 pm at Grant Community High School; 285 E. 

Grand Avenue, Fox Lake. Completed applications must be filed 

at the Village Halt on or before March 31 , 1 998. 



<c 



C26 /Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



March 13, 1998 



220 



HelpWanlcd 
Full-Time 



220 



HelpWanlcd 
Full-Time 



220 



HelpWanlcd 
Full-Time 



/£ 



Dental Assistant 

Modern restorative 

practice seeks an 

enthusiastic detail 

oriented person to join 

our team. Experience 

preferred. 4 day work 

week. Excellent benefits. 



V 



847-234-5766 



N.C, PROGRAM 
ENGINEER 

Warned N.C. Timet Punch Press 
Engineer with Cad knowledge 

preferred. Compelilivc salary and 

excellent benefits. ESOP owned 
company. Mundclcin location. 

Please call 847-678-7573 mi 620 
or fax 847-678-3 1. 15 



ASSURED STAFFING 

Willing to work in 

Hoffman Estates, 

Schaumburg, Palatine or 

BarHngton? 

1 ye*/ experienced preferred 

file detii Se.S0-$?.S0 

Dili tntry S9.50-St0.50 

Admin. AMfaUnb SO-SM hity 

For Interview: call 
B47381.3322 



MERCHANDISER: 

Reliable person to 
service for Nat'l Merch. 
Co. in area dept. stores 
on a p/t basis, monthly. 
$8/hr. Retail exp. prefd. 
Fax resume to: 

1-800-352-5133 



Looking for permanent 

part time / full time 

for Graystake law 

office. Law or Real 

Estate experience a 

plus. Some Word Perfect 

required. 

Call: 

(847) 548-6G37 

or fax resume to 

(8*7) 5*B-fi9« | 




General «y 

OfUcc Help 

needed for 

small company 

in Long Grove, 

Monday-Hrlday 

9 to 5. 

Call Alexis 

-540-6177 



< 



Immediate opening 
for full time legal 
secretary for Fox Lake 
law office; experience 
required; bilingual a 
plus; competitive beni 
efits. Contact Mary at 
(847)587-2551 J 



S260-S300 
Weekly Guaranteed 



No Nights! 
No Weekends 

Paid holidays, vacation & 

health insurance 

available. Need car. 

Call 

merry maids 

Homo Cleaning 

Mundeleln 
847-970-5380 




TRUCK DRIVERS 



Immed Openings. 
Are you an exp'd Truck 

Driver possessing a 

Class A CDL w/HazMat 

endorsement? II so, we seek 

OTR Drivers. Comp pay & 

bonuses & bnfts. 

Mark or Bob 
800-323-3734 






Cosmetic Rep 



Imiu'vmIuvaI iMAr,i cowiilllNfj 

||HM Mil* Rl|) IO HAtll sU\ 

r.\w. ro|(i» /\naI)*>U avI 
kismiiks io fuk|xmmii 
amIAir imIiuiIija! cIiinis 

|\|«KilMt llllplll- 
l>.\HI IIMI / fill IIMI 

CaII 8-l/-'MV-0/»/0 



INVENTORY 
TAKERS 

Looking for early 

morning hours? 

$7.50 to start 

Transportation 

necessary 

Call 

RGIS 

847-662-9277 

E.O.E 



Manufacturing 

GENERAL FACTORY 

WORKERS 

1st Shift 

GROWING LAKE COUNTY MAN- 
UPACTUniNG CO. HAS IMMEDI- 
ATE OPENINGS FOR FULL-TIME 
GENERAL FACTORY WORKERS 
ON ITS FIRST SHIFT. EXCEL- 
LENT STARTING PAY AND BEN- 
EFITS FOR APPLICANTS WITH 
RELIABLE WORK HISTORY. 
APPLY IN PERSON TO: AIR- 
DRIVE, INC., PERSONNEL 
DIRECTOR, 4070 RYAN RD. 
GURNEE, IL 60031, FOR IMME- 
DIATE CONSIDERATION. 



Customer Service 

irWORK FOR THE BEST* 

Fortune 100 company in 
Utxatyville seeks 10 Customer 
Service professionals lor temp -to- 
lure positions in busy call cenier. 
Musi be wry customer focused, 
have computer literacy, and be a 
strong team player, SI Ijhf, plus 
raise when hired. II you're one ol 
the best, CALL 847-520-91 11 
and ask lor Kjm or Wendy or 
FAX resume to 
647-520-9489 today. 
ADVANCED PERSONNEL 



rwTf* . —*^i^^FQ 




LAKOTTA EQUIPMENT j 

& LEASING 
Immcd Openings, Now 
Hiring Quality Prot'l Drivers : 
lor totally new Meet w/ncw 
walk-in sleeper cqppd trac- 
tors. *Pay up lo 32C/mi 
•Vaca/hldy pay *Hlth insur- 
ance/40 IK plan 'Safely & 
pcrlormancc bonus. Must 
have: 2 yrs OTR driving 
exp, 5 yrs veril. work hislory ' 

& pass DOT drug test - 

DUl/DWI. Call B00.467.0559 

or 800.665.0526 lo 

schedule interview. 






ACCOUNTING 

A/P, A/R - Lake 
Forest/Libcrtyville area. 

Growing manufacturer of 
architectural products 

offers nn excellent oppor- 
tunity for n responsible, 
detail-oriented person 

with uood communication 
skills. Windows based 

computer experience pre- 
ferred. Pleasant environ- 
ment and good benefits. 
Flex-lime or Part-lime is 
optional. Please forward 

resume with salary req. to 

28662 N. Ballard Drive, 

Lake Forest, IL 60045 or 

fax 847-816-1064. 



APPOINTMENT 
SETTERS NEEDED. 
Branch office of 
|Kirby Distributing 
now open in Lake 
Zurich. 

20 Full time / Part 
time Immediate 
openings. Hourly 
jwage and weekly 
bonus. Call Jennifer 
for an 
interview. 

(847) 438-8990 



Lake County j 
j Forest Preserve I 
District 

j COORDINATOR II, FOX j 
j RIVER, DARRINGFON, IL j 

• Seasonal positions (20-40 1 
J hours/week) responsible fori 
j selling camping and boating! 

• permits. Maintaining good) 

• housekeeping, providing pub- 1 
J lie information and rules and j 
J regulation enforcement. Ability: 

• to work anytime during) 

• operating hours, Including)* 
j weekends, evenings, open-j 
)lng/closing of clubhouse, and) 
) holidays. Two years expert- j 

• once in iho retail/business! 
J field. Salary $7.50-$8.50/hr. j 

• Applications are available at) 

• and must be relumed to the) 

• Forest Preserve Districl) 
■ j Human Resources Office,: 

:2oon n. Milwaukee Ave.,) 
4 J Libertyville, IL 60048. J 
) 847/367-6540 



/Office Assistant $8-1D/h?\ 
libertyville Medical Office* 

Greet patients, answer 
phones, schedule 
appointments, post 

payments and assist 
doctor. Part-time Hrs 

847-816-1933 



MAINTENANCE 
MECHANIC 

Manufacturer of electric 
motors seeking a 2nd shift 
Maintenance Mechanic. 
| Responsibilities include pro- 
duction equipment mainte- 
nance, repair, Preventative 
Maintenance Scheduling, 

and more. Mechanical 
machine repair experience 
a must. Shitl hours 3:30pm 
to 11:30pm, Send resume, 

apply in person of lax 

! resume with salary require- ! 

ments lo 847-566-7335. 

Hubboll Special Products, 

Inc. 

Maintenance Job 

407 E. Hav/ley SI reel 

Mundolein. IL 60060 



•Equal Opportunity Employer 



——> ' ' i i - «i), i , ,. 



HOUSEKEEPING 
SUPERVISOR 

F.T. EXPERIENCED, 
HANDS-ON SUPERVISOR 

NEEDED TO PLAN, 

ORGANIZE AND DEVELOP 

THE DIRECT OPERATION 

OF DEPT. MUST HAVE 

KNOWLEDGE OF OSHA & 

NURSING HOME 

REGULATIONS. 

REPORTS DIRECTLY 

TO ADMINISTRATOR. 

CARE CENTRE OF 

WAUCONDA 
176 THOMAS COURT 

WAUCONDA, IL 60084 

847/526-5551 

FAX 847/526-0807 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-lime 



Office Clerk 

Management office needs a 

responsible person to work 

alternate weckcnds/part-timc 

evenings. Apply in person 

Vacation Village Association 

6800 Slate Park Rd 

Fox Like. IL 60O20 

Mon-Fn 1 0am to 4pm 

A drug fnx mrking place 



CATV 



; Immed Opening. CATV Field : 
; Walkout & MDU Survey 
I Personnel needed for local • 
'• & nationwide work. 
I Fax resume: ; 

770-682-4500; ; 

Mail: ; 

! Compass Communications, : 
: 1335 Old Norcross Rd.. : 
: Lawroncevillo. GA 30245 T 



OWNER OPERATORS 
& DRIVERS! 

Immed Openings. )oln a 
fast-growing, innovative 
company! Spiril Express, Inc. 
Van & Flatbed opplys. We 
offer: 'Comp pay 'Weekly 
settlements 'Insurance pro- 
grams 'Rider programs. Call 
today & lei us describe our 
program! 800-617-7580 



RENTAL CLERK 

Apt. complex In Vernon I till i seeks 

i ■ I n L '_■ person. 

I >m Its Include: 

Leasing, tenant In/out processing. 

purchasing/inventory central, 
maintenance at records and flics, 
reports, rcril collection, social 
programming. Knowledge ol sec- 
lion 8 preferred. 
Send resume and salary 
requirements to: 
Pcbblcshtrc Phase I Apis.. 
695 Westmoreland Drive, Suite 
105, Vernon Mills. IL COOGI 
or call (847)367-1504. 
E/O/F. 



•MANAGER 
•ASSISTANT 
MANAGERS 

BOAT/U.S. 

A Lxading dlKount rriiiMrr of 
hurting lUpplln, W M-tldnc rxp'd 
rrl»:l Mcirr imnifrn A ■isivtanl 
ttnir manager*. Sutcrnful nndl- 
dim mint be uln dritrn, cut- 
Inmrr wrelcc orfrnttd, hate 

VlninR Ifildrrvllip lUIlt, « |imtrn 
Irnck TTtord & • gfl-lHlime alii- 
luitr. Hulling r«p. I* a plui! Wt 
nlTt r a ular? cnmmr nuiralr w/cip. 
& an aultlandlni. ItrnrflU package. 
Srnd )our mumr Including. uUr) 
hUtnrjto: 1IOAT/U.K, U.K. IJrpIn 
RK0 S. IMekrtl St., Alt uifiilrla, VA 
IU04 or tat Id: (710-4*1 -LW). 



EOEM/F 







■ | l i 'lHfllimHHW W IIIIIIII 

SALES/ 

CUSTOMER 

SERVICE 

Conveyor company looking 

for a lull-time person with 

lechnical experience. 

: Full package benefits plus 

profit sharing. 

Apply in parson a( 
Roll-A-Way Conveyors | 
2335 Delany Road 
Gtirnce, IL 60031 

or fax resume to: 

Dan Sullivan, President 

847-336-6542 



' * * * a — * hihiim i i i 



Radiology 

RADIOLOGY 
TRANSCR1PTI0N1STS 

l*aJI *»a Pirt-TlaM, 
VarUMt ShlfU 

Condell Medical Contor, the pro, 
grcssivo loader ol hcnltti caie in 
Laka County, is looking tor q ua i|. 
ftod radiology Iransciipuonists. 

Transleniog recorded dictatton 
from Iho ladiologist, the qualitied 
candldata will transcribe ttio 
notes Into our computer sys- 
tems, Medical terminology and 
oupononco with Word Perfect 
required. 

Eligible candidates will rocolvo 
full bono tits which Includes 
health insurance, on-sho day- 
care and hoalthclub. Send 
resume to: Linda Weldman, 
Condoll Medical Center, Human 
flosourcos Ocpt., 303 Clovoland 
Avo„ Ubortyvillo, IL 60048. (647) 
3G2-2905 X5238. FAX: (847) 
91Q-8309.EOE 



SALES 
MANAGEMENT 

OPPORTUNITY 

Wo are: One ol the largest 
marketers of financial prod. 
ucts in North America, 
looking lor people who 
want to succeod. Wo oflor: 
An excellent educational 
system lo leach you our 
business, a comprehensive 
support notwork, and com- 
petitive products that aro 
highly dosirablo lo most 
consumers. 
Candidates should: Dosiro 
an excellent income, be 
committed to working hard 
and possess a strong 
doslre lo succeed. For 
lujnoro Information, contact 
^k 1-800-357-2366 



225 



Business 
OpporliinillcJ 



JilWAKE UHIII 

Businoss Is groal, 

work from homoll 

Wo mako 2K o wook 

and moro. 

Nol MLM. 

1-0OO-995-O790 oxl. 2678 

Two minuto recording. 



$75,000 SIX MONTHS 

WILL TRAIN, 

NO EXPERINCE 

NECESSARY. 

1-800-322-6169 

OXt. 8030 24hrs, 

BIG FAT PAYCHECKSI 

Work with TVs Brad Rlchdats. 
Give away Free Websites. 
FREE to join. Details 24 hours. 
888-309-4600. Marketers 
Worl d International. 

CLEANING SERVICE, 
WELL established, specializ- 
ing In liu'jr care, carpet clean- 
ing and readiness services. 
(847) 395-947S. 

GET YOUR SHARE; Innova- 
tive nutritional company paid 
$129 million 55 to motivated 
individuals last year alone. 
S8.95 gets you started, FT/PT 
opportunity. Training avail- 
able, 24 hour recorded details. 
1-S0Q-276-581B. 

LOOKING FOR A CHANGE? 
S2K-S5K Potential I 

No MLMI 

Fantastic Support. 

1-800-995-0796 

ext. 2940. 



228 



Situations Wanted 



1 HAVE AN OPENING -TO 
CLEAN YOUR HOUSE, pre- 
fer on weekly basis. Very thor- 
ough and dependable. Non- 
smoker. Roferoncos. (847) 
546-3759 leave message. 



240 


Child Care 




CALLING ALL LAKE 
COUNTY MOMSIII Bright 
Beginnings Family Day Care 
Notwork is looking lor nurtur- 
ing, responsible, creative Indi- 
viduals who would like to start 
their own business while slay- 
ing homo with their children. It 
you live in Lake Villa, Linden- 
hurst, Gurnoe, Grayslako or 
Round Lake and would liko as- 
sistance in getting licensed, 
ongoing technical assistance, 
and child referrals, ihls pro- 
gram is tor you. For more infor- 
mation on how lo become a 
quality infant and toddler day 
care provider in your home, 
call Dena Thompson (847) 
356-4112. 

CALLING ALL WORKING 
MOMSIII Fall is just around 
the cornor, have you plannod 
your children's day care yot? 
Immediate openings for child- 
ren ages 6/wecks & up aro 
available in Bright Beginnings 
Home Day Caro Notwork. For 
more information on, how lo 
enroll your child In a conven- 
ienify located, quality day caro 
homo, please call Dena 
Thompson at (847) 356-4112, 
SPACES ARE LIMITED. SO 
CALL IMMEDIATELY,. 

CHILD CARE NEEDED in 

our Grayslake homo starling 
in April. References required. 
Non-smoker. (847) 223-5852. 

CHILD CARE NEEDED 
Northwest Suburbs and Chica- 
go, full/part-time, S350- 
$500/wook. Speak English. 
(847) 634-B636. 

FOSTER HOMES NEED- 
ED) Wantod good, nurturing 
individuals lo provido tempo- 
rary homes lor children agos 
birth lo adolescent. Training, 
support, compensation, day 
care provided. Contact Cathol- 
ic * Charities/Lako County. 
(847) 782-4242 or (847) 782- 
4243, 

FOX LAKE AREA Mature 
live-in child caro needed, 3- 
school age children. Mom with 
child OK. (647) 397-2282. 

MOTHER OF 2 WILL BA- 
BYSIT in her Gurnoe home, 
lull/pnrt-tlmo, lloxiblo wllh ago 
and or hours. Reasonable 
rates, (847) 336-5343, 

PLAN AHEAD FOR SUM- 
MER DAYCARE! 'Limited 
Space Available', Grass Lako 
School area. (047) 395-6 972. 

PROFESSIONAL COUPLE 

SEEKS LOVING PERSON 

experienced with children to 

cam for our 2 & 4yr. old in our 

SS, y k ° homo ' lnt!u "os 
light housekeeping. 7-9hrs. 

2»y« Monday-Fridov ' 

8300/wook. Paid V S 

tion/hcallh benefits. Non- 
smokers only. Must have own 
reliable transportation. (B471 
548-4413. y n 



250 



School/lnstrvction 



BEKA TEXTBOOKS & 
VIDEO SCHOOL on display 
near you. Contact us at 
www.aboka.com/ncl or 1-800- 
074-2353 oxt. 20 for more In- 
ter malion 



301 



Antiques 



LOOKING TO BUY AN- 
TIQUES, complete estates or 
single items. Specializing In 
40's furniture. (847) 

263-8562. 



304 


Appliances 



USED APPLIANCE SALE. 
All reconditioned & guar- 
anteed. Refrigerators, ranges, 
washers/dryers & freezers. 
Delivery & Installation avail- 
able. 

Wahl Appliance Contor 
1209 Court Street 
McHonry, IL 
(815)385-1872. 



310 



Bazaars/Crafts 



FLEE MARKET/BAKE 

SALE Sunday, March 22nd, 
8am-4pm, Round Lako Area 
Mons Club. Limited Spaces 
Available, $i5/ea. 50-50 cash 
radio and door prizes! (847) 
546-9813, (847) 740-0306. 



314 


Building Materials 



STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
30x40x10. $4,610. 40x60x14, 
$8,620. 50x75x14. $11,683. 
50x100x16, $15,715. 

60x100x16, $18,016. Mini- 
storage buildings. 30x120. 24 
unils, $11,204. Free 
brochures. Sentinel Buildings, 
800327-0790. Extension 79. 

STEEL BUILDINGS: 3 
buildings factory cancellation • 
30'x40', 40'x60\ 50'xlOO'. 
Farm and commercial applica- 
tions straight wall 1006ft. 
eves. Now materials • will sac- 
rifice. TOLL FREE: 1 -888-568- 
4349. 




1 1 Business 
^ Office tiquipmcnl 



7-1/2FT. WINEGUARD 'C" 
BART DISH with Echoslar 
710 rocoivor with remote, 
$1,500. (815) 477-9282. 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 



VX PRO 160 24X CD ROM 
95 WINDOWS, $550. (847) 
382-9532. 



330 



Garage 
HummnRc Sale 



AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and there 
is still things that just did not 
go.... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run it 
under Iho 'FREE or Givea- 
ways* classified column. FREE 
ADS aro NO CHARGEI 
(847)223-8161.ex1. 140. 



I 



LINCOLNSHIRE § 

MIMMAGE 

SALE 

Stevenson High School 

On Rle 22 West of 

Milwaukee Ave. 

Saturday March 21 

7:30am to 1:30pm 



mtmt m m mM 



338 



Horses Stacks 



SHAVINGS! 

Hay, straw, horse feed. 

Purina Dog & Cat Food. 

Chlckon Food and 

Much moro, 

(414) 857-2525. 

WE DELIVER! 

M-F 8-5 

Sot. 0-3, 



340 



Household Goods 
I'umitunc 



BLACK ' 35 HEXAGON 
FISH; TANK with black tank. 
all accessories and 20 fish. ' 
Asking $275. Black glass and 
gold; eoffsd lable, slides open 
to 2-tablas. Asking $275, Gray 
formica dlnlngroom set with 4- 
black and gray chairs. Asking 
5600, Must see to approciato. 
$200 down payment, pay In 2- 
months. Will sell fast, call soon, . 
(847) 680-7567. 

BLACK LEATHER SOFA, 
89'x33', vary comfy, $500. 
Salon reception desk, 5'x2', 
poach, 3-roll about stations, 
poach/black. (847) 441-0855. 

CAPTAINS BED, TWIN 

size and twin box spring, 
S50/both. (647) 625-1795. 

DESIGNER MODEL 

HOME 

FURNITURE SALE 

Sofa/lovcseat set. hunler 

green and cranberry, $595. 

Sofa/loveseat set, 

earth tones, $695, 

Other sets, plaids, 

florals and leathers, etc. 

Dlnlngroom set, 

10-pioce, $1,595. 

Bedroom set 

6-plece, $995. 

(847)329-4119. 

DININGROOM SET IN 
groat condition for sale. In- 
cludes buffet, GOin. long, 
hutch, 27in. wide, 48in. high, 
baso cabinet, 27ln. wide, 29m. 
high, 2-armed chairs and 4- 
side chairs. Tablo is 6ft. in 
length extending to 9lt. wilh 
18m, leaves, pads included, 
Sot is contemporary design 
with dark pecan condition. 
$600/bcst. Call (847) 395- 
8312 after 6pm. 

DININGROOMTABLE, 
PADS, LEAF, 6-chairs, 2- 
arm chairs, solid Rosewood. 
Originally $12,500, asking 
S4.500. (847) 940-1534. 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or appliances, If 

you aro having a Garago 

Sate or It you have a 

house to sell or apartment 

to rent. 

Call Lisa before* 10am . 

Wodnoodny to place 

your ad here. 

(047) 223-0161 

ext. 140. 

MODEL HOME 

FURNITURE. 

Excess and unclaimed 

sofas, lovcaeats, 

chairs, tables. , .- 

DININGROOM, SETS, 

BEDROOMSETS, 

LEATHERS, etc. 

(630)778-3433. 

SONY WEB TV with remote 
keyboard, $175/besl. (847) 
4B7-4767. .__ 

THREE PIECE SECTION- 
AL SOFA, oil while with 
queen sizo sleeper, good con- 
dition, $150 cash only. (847) 
548-1508. 



ARABIAN MARE GREY, 
15.2HH, 11 yrs. old, Western 
Pleasure, loads, clips, smooth 
gates, intelligent, (414) 
059-21 15 alter 5:30pm. 

GOOD BROKE HORSES 
FOR SALE. Boarding stalls, 
excellent feed, lots ot kails.' 
$250/month. (630) 443-8BO0. 

HAY FOR SALE Delivery 
available. (815) 338-4885, 



NINE MONTH OLD 

BREEDING STOCK PAINT 
FILLY. Vory swool. Slro is 
B/W haller champion. Moving 
canl lako with. $1,000. (815) 
338-5721. 



344 


Jewelry 



WEDDING SET: SOLI- 
TARE SMkt. round diamond 
in plain setting. Appraised at 
$2,000. Best oflor. Call after 
7pm (847) 746-3452. 



348 



Liwn/Garden 



THINK SPRING! 

WELTER LANDSCAPING 

& LAWN MAINTENANCE 

Lol us holp you got your yard 

ready (or the coming season. 

Servicos Includo: 

•Cleaning of all leaves 

and debris. 

•Edging & mulching of 

bedding areas. 

Trimming of shrubs 

and bushes. 

Call Stove for FREE estimate. 

(847) 546-0415. 



350 


Miscellaneous 



AEROBIC RIDER WITH ris- 
er, oxcellent condition, like 
new. Original $300, asking 
$200/best. (847) 625-7391 
after 6pm. 

BALLOON SUPPLIES, 

DISPLAY stand and balloon 
wrap vacuum machine, 
$500/bOSt, (847) 356-2258. 



BEAUTY SHOP EQUIP- 
MENT shampoo bowl, hy- 
draulic chair, shampoo chair, 
stalion with mirror, adjuslabto 
dryer, never used. $600. (847) 
740-1 B64. 




March 13, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers f £27 



350 



Miscellaneous 



WON IN RAFFLE1 BRAND 
NEW-NEVER USED Sam- 
sung 8MM Video Camera 
Recorder, Electronic Color 
Viowfinder. 12:1 Power Zoom 
wilh macro function, 4 mode 
program AE, Hying erase 
head, digital signal process- 
ing, digital special effect, built- 
in CG litter, wireless remote 
control, manual focus ring, 
carrying case. S450/best. All 
serious offers considered. 
(847) 973-1848 leave mes- 
sage^ 

GRAVELY LAWN MOWER 

and snowblower, ' needs work, 
best offer. (847) 740-1384, 

PRECIOUS MOMENTS 
MANY old pieces. 2-sots of 
Norman Rockwell, plates, 8- 
American Dream and 8 Mind 
of Her Own, plus racks. 1711. 
Arrowglass boat. 115hp John- 
son outboard, excellent condi- 
tion. (B47) 395-5439. 

PRICED TO SELL! 5-vend- 
ing machines, includes all sup- 
plies, S2,300/best. (847) 
244-6464. _^ 

PRINCESS Dl ORIGINAL 
BEANIE BABY, S225. 
Rooster, $50. Peace Bear. 
S25. Snowman, $25. (847) 
566-6911 7am-9am or after 
5:30pm. -\ 

SOLID OAK PATIO DOOR, 

9ft., still In box. Will sell and In- 
stall for 50% of original price. 
Call tod3y. (847) 543-81 13. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME, Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEI Commercial/home 
units from SI 99. Low monthly 
payments. FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-842- 
1310. 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



MEDICARE RECIPIENTS: 
ARE you using a NEBULIZER 
MACHINE? STOP paying full 
price for Albuterol, Atrovont, 
etc. solutions. MEDICARE will 
pay for them. We bill Medicare 
for you and ship directly to 
your door. MED-A-SAVE 1- 
B0O-538-9B49. 



358 



Mmlcnl Instruments 



ELECTRIC ORGAN, PAD- 
DED bench, mus|c rack, in- 
struction books. Play tunes Im- 
mediately. Great for all ages. 
$60. 34"wx15-1/2"dx32-1/2"h. 
(017) 5660990. 



360 



Pels & Supplies 



368 



Tools & 
Machinery 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



BEANIE BABIES BUYING 
all reiiredsiTWe pay top dollar. 
1-800-296-1197 Kenosha, 
Wisconsin. 1 - -_ 

CASH FOR TRAINS, Lion- 
el, American Flyer, Marx and 
access. Call Brad (847) 662- 
0447, (647) 336-6989. 

GERMAN WORLD I AND II 
WAR SOUVENIRS. Call Ron 
(414)658-8072. :'- . 

Slot Machines WANTED-' 
ANY CONDITION^ or 
Ports. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines, 
Paying CASHI Call 
(630)985-2742. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



AQUARIUM EQUIPMENT 
20-40% Savings! Examples: 
Motors, Healers $5+; Power- 
lilters $10+1 Aquariums: 75 
$89; 90 $149; 125*5199; 180 
$399! Aquatic World (414) 
567-7339. 

CHIHUAHUA, POODLES, 
POMERANIANS, AKC. alt 
colors, 1st. shots. Call anytime 
(815) 932-3064. 

DO YOU ENJOY working 
wilh animals? Do you have 2 
hours per week to spare? Assi- 
sl Animal Foundation, one of 
the area's no-kill shelters is 
seeking volunteers for work 
that is highly rewarding and 
funl We need men and 
women who: can work with 
cats and dogs, do light repair 
work and can answer phones 
and other office duties. We are 
located in Crystal Lake. For 
more information please call 
(815)459-0990. 

VACATION? 

PET SITTING AND 

BEYOND! 

Wo como to your home, 

wilh TLC. 

Bonded and Insured. 

(847) 473-5776. 



ASPHALT LAYTON PAV- 
ER, must sell, 52,500. (414) 
697-9206. 

CIRCULAR TABLE SAW 
10", wilh veneer scoring saw, 
Blesemeyer T-square fence 
table on right side, and sliding 
table on left side. S2,500/bost. 
(815)337-0897. 

FOR SALE LARGE ME- 
CHANICS TOOL BOX AND 
TOOLS. Snap-on Cornwell, 
Craftsman, etc. Too much to 
list. Call (847) 680-9558, leave 
namo, phone number and 
time to return your call. 

THOMAS REGISTRY, 

199B EDITION, complete sel, 
still in cartons, $100. (047) 
223-1693. 



500 


Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



ANTIOCH NEWER BUILD- 
ERS CUSTOM HOME Fea- 
turing ■ hardwood maple floor, 
cathedral ceiling, skylights, 
fireplace, balcony ofl master 
bedroom. 4-bedrooms, 3-full 
baths, .whirlpool, many bullt- 
ins, oak trim and doors, gaze- 
bo and large deck. Walk to pri- 
vate beach in quiet subdivl- 
Sipn, S1 89.900. (847) 
395-7568, __ 

FOX LAKE-ANTIOCH- 
SPR1NG GROVE 
2,O0OSQ.FT., 3-bodroom, 2- 
bath, $127,900. (847) 
587-8520. Photo @ www.for- : 
solebyovmer.com (code 
7818411). 

ATTENTION EASY TO 
BUY 2-bedroom, 1-bath. 
$4,200 down. $750 monthly, 
Round Lake Beach. (847) 
872-4047. 

BY OWNER JOHNSBURG, 

master. suite plus 3-bedroams, 
den, 2.5 baths, famllyroom, liv- 
ingroom, diningroom, dream 
kitchen, lake rights, A'C, excel- 
lent deck, 2.75 car garage, 
mature oaks on largo lot, 
$168.900.(647)497-3792. 

BY OWNER; $164,900 

Boaulilul 4-bcdroom home in 
desirable Oaktreo, Grayslake 
Schools. Ovor . 2.200sq.lt., 
open lloor plan, Bi-level with 
walk-out lower level, brick fire- 
place in familyroom, vaulted 

ceilings In Hvlrtgraom and rnao- 
tor bedroom.' Premium corner 
tot next to pond ond woilands. 
landscaped mature trees. 
Walk to shopping, Metra, 
park. Great prico. (847) 
223-6213. 

CARY 3-BEDROOM UP- 
DATED ranch, 2.5 car heated 
garage, oak trim, ceramic tile, 
newer lurnace, A/C, largo 
deck, screen porch and .short 
walk to privato lake. Call for ap- 
pointment. $123,000. (847) 
516-8762. 

DECEIVING FROM THE 
OUTSIDE, MUCH BIGGER 
THAN IT LOOKS, ranch 3- 
bedroom, 2-full balh, full fin- 
ished basement, C/A, deep 1- 
car garage, all appliances, 
loads of upgrades, land- 
scaped. (815) 344-8705. 

ROCHESTER WELL MAIN- 
TAINED 4-bedroom, 2-1/2 
bath' ranch homo on 1-acro. 
Lowest taxes in the area. 
SI 39.000. (414) 534-6020. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH Im- 
maculate newer 3-bedroom, 2- 
1/2 bath, fireplace. C/A, base- 
ment, main floor laundry, 
vaulted ceilings. 2-car garage, 
oversized yard. Great neigh- 
borhood! PRICED FOR IM- 
MEDIATE SALEI! $125,000. 
(815)337-3448. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 
1pm-4prh. Immaculate 4- 
bedroom, 2-1/2 balh. family- 
room, liroplace, basement, 
largo deck, good location, so 
many extras. By Owner. 
S169.000. 2385 N. Sunrise. 
(847) 265-9649. 

ROUND LAKE, ROUND 

Lake/Lake Villa Schools. 
Large corner lot near park. 
Musi sell fasll Building! 3-bcd- 
rooms. 2-1/2 balhs, A/C, fire- 
place, appliances, attached 
house, 2-car garage, 
$123,000. (847) 265-6042. 

SHARRON WELL KEPT 5 

acre farmette, 3-bedrooms, 2- 
baths, 27ft. pool, lots of stor- 
age area. Horsos O.K. 
$199,900. (414) 736-4345. 

WILDWOOD BY OWNER 3- 
bedroom, 2-balh plus large 
garage. Gurnoo Schools. 
Great parks. Central gas heal 
and central A/C. Muni, wa- 
ter/sewer. Woodburnlng liro- 
place. 5136,000/Discount lor 
fast closo. I have all forms and 
disclosures. Please call (847) 
54B-1356 



GRAYSLAKE 2YR. NEW 
home, very large 2-bedroom, 
2-slory home,. Tn/2 baths, 
eat-in kitchen', greatroom with 
18ft. ceiling, fireplace, C/A, full 
basement, fenced-in yard, 2- 
car attached garage, extend- 
ed driveway, great neighbor- 
hood, close to shopping, 5- 
minutcs from train. Must see. 
$158,000. OPEN HOUSE 
SUNDAY 3/15/9B, 10am- 
4pm. (847) 548-5617. 

I BUY HOUSES 

Also 

Money to Buy, 

Build or Refinance 

Your Home/Income Properly 

. Lender Flexible. 

Fast Closings. 

(847) 872^4047. 

INGLESIDE WATER- 

FRONT 2 LOTS Be con- 
nected to the Chain. 2-bed- 
room. t-bath bungefow, wilh 
full basement, concrete boat 
well, flagstone patio, central i 
air conditioning, 2-car garage, ' 
large parking lot. $120,000. 
(815) 759-0069. (847) 265- 
169 °- ' 

INGLESIDE/FOX LAKE 
7YR. old raised ranch in like 
new condition, 8-rooms, 3- 
balhs, 2nd kitchen, in-law pos- 
sible, take rights, large 2-1/2. 
car attached garage, cedar 
deck, new A/C, new quality 
carpet and ceramic floors, 
many more upgrades. Great 
location, near Menard's and 
new Jewel food store. 
S142,900/bOSl. (847) 587- 
9122 or 1-B00-91 7-5848. No 
agents please. . 

LAKE VILLA FOR SALE 
BY OWNER, neat and clean, 
3-bedroom, 2-bath home, 2- 
car garage, wifh pool. Call 
Maria (847) 816-4013 or 
Christina (773) 477-3021. 

LAKE VILLA SCHOOLS. 
Beautiful 3-bedroom, 2-1/2 
balh home in Country Walk 
Subdivision. Many upgrades 
including, vaulted ceilings, 
master bedroom suite with 
walk in closet and whirlpool 
tub, large 32x16 deck over- 
looking 7 acre park wilh ten- 
nis, basketball courts, base- 
ball field and childrens play- 
ground. This is truly a family 
paradise; Asking'' SI 39,900. 
OPEN HOUSE Every Sunday 
12pm-3pm. (847) 356-8053. 

LAKEFRONT HOME 

HOME on Bluff Lake (Chain- 
O-Lakcs). 2-bedrooms, fire- 
place, C/A, loft. full, basement, 
2-car garage, pier, appliances 
included. Single owner. New 
carpeting, roof, and dishwash- 
er. For appointment call (B47) 
395-5439. Priced to sell 
$193,400: Will lower prico 
$300 each Thursday until 
house is sold. 

MUNDELEIN BEAUTIFUL 
HOUSE, only 9yrs. old, bright 
and spotless, neutral decor, 7- 
rooms, 3-bodrooms, 2-1/2 
balhs, 2-car garage, fireplace, 
need immediate sale. 
$173,000.(847)970-9504. 



Recycle 



COUNTRY UVING 

Beautiful 4 

Bedroom Ranch, 

Large Family Room 

wilh Fireplace, 
Hardwood Floors, 
Double 1/2 Acre 
Lot Across from 
Lake in a very desir- 
able neighborhood. 
$144,900.00 
(847) 838-2220 



*SEC7ION 8 DESIRED 
& APPROVED* 

2404 Elisa, Zion, 
Huge 4 Bd • 1 Bd. & 
Studios from $325 • 
1446 Kristan 3 Bd. N.' 
Chi. • 1517 Lyons 3 
Bd. Wkgn. • 426 
Liberty 2 & 3 Bd. 
Wkgn 

Lake Cook 
Property Mngt. 
1-312-837-0600 



500 


Home; For Sale 



Best Deal 
in Gurnee 



j Gorgeous Grandwood Park 

Trl-Level, 4 Bedrooms, 2 

{Full. Balhs, Large Living and 

Family Rooms wilh 

Fireplace, Eat-in Kitchen, 

Large Lot; On Pond. 

$129,000.00 . 

(847)838-2220 



Prime Chain 
Frontage 

Enjoy Spectacular 

Lake Views 
New Construction 
Will Build To Suit 

Mid 300's 
(847) 838-2220 



FISHER AND FISHER : FILE NO. 30720 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Norwest Mortgage Inc., A California 

Corporation, Case No. 96 C 8106 

Plaintiff. Judge Norgle 



VS. 



Peter P. Chen 
Defendants.. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 



(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered 
In the above entitled cause on April 1S. 1997 . 
I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court will on April 
30, 1 998 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at Lake County Court House, 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the fol- 
lowing described premises: 
c/k/a 317 S. Oak Street, Waukegan, IL 60085 
Tax ID #08-28-211-009 y 

The improvements on the property consist of Townhouse, brick 
construction, two story and attached garage, - 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount was $$93,758.12. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney. 
Fisher and Fisher. 120 North LaSalle. Chicago. Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois taw, the Sales 
Officer is qoJ required to provide additional Information other than 
thai set forth In this Notice. 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 32774 

. IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
■ NORTHERN DISTRICT OF.ILUNOIS EASTERN DIVISION 

Bank "br America, ^SB 

Plaintiff, 
VS. . Cjse Mo. 97 C 6375 

Carmen Morales and G rise Ida Morales Judge Kocoras 
Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE MO. 32774 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered 
in the above entitled cause on November 20. 1997 . 

I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court will on April 
24, 1998 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at Lake County Court House, 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the follow- 
ing described premises: 

c/k/a 552 Bonniebrook Avenue, Mundelein, IL 60060 
Tax ID #10-24-411-017 

The improvements on the property consist of Townhouse, brick 
construction, two story and attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount was S1 33,559.71, 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 120 North '.aSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer is rjpj required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO 32488 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation f/k/a 
Chemical Residential Mortgage Corporation 
Plaintiff, 

vs - Case No. 97 C 5303 

Wilhe M. Neal and Rosalyn M. Neal Judge Norgle 

Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 334ttfl 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN. ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered 

In the above entitled cause on December 19. 1997 . 

I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court will on March 
30. 1998 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at Lake County Court House, 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the follow- 
ing described premises: - 
c/k/a 127 S. Chapel St., Waukegan, IL 60085 
Tax ID* 08-21 -320-009 

The improvements on the property consist of single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 
The properly will NOT be open for Inspection, 
The judgment amount was 591, 572.89 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 
For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher. 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer is no! required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 32341 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Norwest Mortgage, Inc., a California 
Corporation 

Plaintiff, 
VS. - Case No. 97 C 4957 

Jeffrey C. Boyden and Windie R. Boyden, Judge UNDBERG 

Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR RLE NO, 32341 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to 3 Judgement entered 
in the above entitled cause on November 20, 1997. 

I, Stephen Nagy, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
April 13. 1MB at the hour of 11:00 a.m. at the front door Lake 
County Court House, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder 
for cash, the following described premises: 
c/k/a 291 5 Enoch Avenue, Zion. IL 60099 
TaxlD#O4-28-205-OO8 

The improvements on the property consist of single family 
dwelling. 

■ Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount was S97.073.31 . 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale wtiich will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For information can the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher. 120 North LaSalle, Chicago. Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m, lo 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer is rjfll required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth in this Notice. 



Case No.97 C 4248 
Judge CONLON 



FISHER AND FISHER RLE NO. 32132 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 

Federal Savings Bank, 

Plaintiff. 
VS. 

American National Bank and Trust 
Company of Chicago, as TAJ/T 
agreement dated March 2, 1993 
and known as Trust #116670-03, 
Laszek Gadek,' Anna Gadek and 
Spatter Finance Co. 
Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

QUR RLE NO, 32132 

(fT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OVVN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered 

In the above entitled cause on November 6. 1997. 

I, Michael Polelle, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
April 1, 1998 at the hour of 9:30 a.m. at front door. Lake County 
Courthouse, 18 N. County Street, Waukegan, sell to the highest 
bidder for cash, the following described premises: 
c/k/a 360 Alta Drive.' Grayslake, IL 60030 
Tax 1D# 06-34-215-018 

The improvements on the property consist of single family 
dwelling. 

Sate Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject lo 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. — - 

The judgment amount was $1 00.094.18 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which win entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 
For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs' Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law. the Sales 
Officer is dqI required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth in this Notice. 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO, 31451 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 

First Trust National Association, as Trustee, 
1993-20 

Plaintiff, 
VS. Case No. 97 C 2072 

Sung H. Kim and Young O. Kim. Chicago Title Judge Castillo 
and Trust, as Trustee and The Board of 
Managers of Country Towne Property Owners 
Association 
Defendants. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR RLE N O , 3145 1 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES] 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement entered 
in the above entitled cause on May 22. 1997 . 

I, Edward Grossman, Special Commissioner for this court will 
on April 20, 1 998 at the hour of 1 :00 p.m. at the Lake County Court 
House, 18 N. County Street, Waukegan. Illinois, sell to the highest 
bidder for cash, the following described premises: 
c/k/a 34199 N. Homestead Road, Gurnee, Illinois 
Tax ID# 07-20-301-048 

The improvements on the property consist of single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sate shall be subject to 
genera! taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount was $153,147.58. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser, to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law, 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. lo 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, th9 Sales 
Officers dqi required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth in this Notice. 



To Subscribe to 

Lakeland- 
Newspapers 

Please call 

847.223.8161 



Vi 



028 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



.March 13, 1998 



»■• 



504 



Homes For Renl 



504 



I tomes For Rent 



514 



Condo/Town Homes 



520 



Apartments For Renl 



COUNTRY LIVING NEAR 

all conveniences, 3 -bedroom 
home on lake surrounded by 
forest preserve, located on 
dead-end lane, 1 mile W. of 
Undenhurst Plaza, 2-car ga- 
rage, fireplace, fenced yard, 
small pets considered, 
51,200/month plus security. 
April/May 1st. (414} 742-4484 
after 6pm. 

FOX LAKE 2-BEDROOM 

house, wllh pier and lake 
rights. Available April 1st. 
$67S/monlh. (S47) 567-4136. 

GRASS LAKE WATER- 
FRONT, furnished, (5- 
rooms) 2-bedroom house, 
pay own utilities, non-smoker, 
S770/month, plus security, ref- 
erences and $25 non-refund- 
able credit check. Leave mes- 
sage (708) 7BB-S564, 

GURNEE 2-BEDROOM 
RANCH, 1-bath, fireplace, 
washer/dryer, 2-1/2 car ga- 
rage, large yard. Available 
April 1st. No pets. 
$1 ,050/monih, security depos- 
il and credit check required. 
(647) 336-^020, 

LAKE VILLA WEST Milt- 
more. 2-bedrorfm, 2-car at- 
tached garage, washeV/dryer, 
C/A, fireplace, BIG llvingroom, 
BIG diningroom, BIG yard, 1- 
block from lake, $950/mon!h. 
Available immediately. (847) 
356-0293. 

LAKEFRONT EAST 

SHORE PISTAKEE LAKE, in 
town Fox Lake, smaller, 3- 
bodroom ranch, 1-3/4 bath, 

huge livingroom and dining- 
room, fireplace, A/C, all ap- 
pliances, 2-car garage with 
attic storage, double lot with 
pier. Close to train and 
schools. The prettiest sunsets 
on the Chain O'Lakes. 
51,200/month, double securi- 
ty lease. Available May 15lh. 
Russ & Linda Klauss (847) 
587-8499, (847) 587-8500. 

UNDENHURST 3-BED- 
ROOMS, 1-1/2 baths, new 
carpeting, built-ins, 
$1,125/month, Available im- 
mediately. 2208 Briar Ln. 
(773^235-8411. 

NORTH CHICAGO, 1614 
Grove Ave. Upper unit, 2-bcd- 
room duplex for rent. For 
more information call Eusilva 
Williams. (847) 263-7058. 

OWN FOR LESS THAN 
RENT) Own your own 2-bod- 
room Mobilo Home In Park 
Clly lor 5620/month with only 
S500 down. Call (B47) 319- 
6366 leave message. 

ROUND LAKE PARK 
2,000sq.f1.. 3-bodrooms, 2.5 
baths, loll, formal diningroom, 
fenced yard, garage, C/A, 
walk to school/train, 15 miles 
to Great Lakes NTC. Non- 
smokers only. Available now. 
St,300/monlh. Call 9am-2pm, 
leave message, (847) 546- 
5010, pager anytime (847) 
225-3700, or o-mail: 

jllt@aol.com 



RURAL AREA 
GRAYSLAKE SCHOOLS 

Well kept 3-bcdroom home 

with finished basement and 

hardwood floors, out buildings 

perfect for projects, 

stalls for horses, 

pets considered. 

$1,200/monlh 

if you have horses, 

51,000/monlh 

without horses. 

(847) 546-3154 

leave message on machine. 

WAUCONDA 2-BEDROOM 
HOUSE, LAKE rights, all 
new Inside, $775/monlh plus 2 
months security. , (630) 
529-2465. 

WILDWOOD 3-BED- 

ROOM, .1-1/2 balh, large 
kitchen, full basement, lake- 
view, largo dock, wooded lot, 
Sl.150/monlh. (847) 

223-2408 evenings, (847) ■ 
223-5225 days. 



ONE OF A KIND GARDEN 
TOWNHOME FOR SALE, 3- 
bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths, fire- 
place, C/A, very clean, many 
upgrades throughout. All ap- 
pliances Included. Exclusively 
private backyard with toosq.lt. 
patio overlooking rock water 
garden with waterfall and 
small bridge that leads to per- 
ennial garden. Open House 
Saturday and Sunday, 12pm- 
4pm. (847) 487-6311. 



514 



Gondo/Toun Homes 



DELAVAN 2-BEDROOM 
CONDO, oversized garage, 
neutral carpet, all amenities, 
club house, S1,000/monlh, de- 
posit negoliable. (847) 
526-0333. 

FOX LAKE TOWNHOUSE 

TO SHARE, with garage, 
$400/month. (847) 526-0333. 

GURNEE SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT, 3-bedrooms, 2-bath 
lownhouse, freshly painted, all 
appliances stay. Pool and park 
for kids. "Asking $75,500. Call 
for appointment (847) 
249-6803 leave message. 

TOWNHOME FOR RENT 
Newer 3-story, 2-bedroom, 
each with private balh, largo 
kitchen with 1/2 balh and laun- 
dry, 2-car garage. C/A, low 
utilities, wooded selling. 
5900/month plus utilities, se- 
curity deposit. Round Lake. 
(847) 291-5444 days, (847) 
587-9623 evenings, 

OWNER TRANSFERRED! 
MUST SELLI New construc- 
tion: Townhouse in unique 
wooded court yard. 3-bed- 
rooms, 2-1/2 baths, 2-car at- 
tached, C/A, gas fireplace in 
bay window. Oak trim through- 
out, upgraded flooring and GE 
appliances slay. Includes self 
cleaning oven, dishwasher, 
disposal, sido-by-sido refrig- 
erator with water service In 
door, and largo capacity wash- 
er/dryer. Cathedral coiling in 
large master bedroom with 
bay window, balcony, walk-in 
closet and alcove loft. Over- 
sized tub in master bath. Ceil- 
ing lans with dimmer lights in 
master bedroom and second 
bedroom. End unit with cus- 
tom patio off front deck. Walk 
to Melra. Extras include: wind- 
ow treatments, chamber 
doors and extra shelving in fin- 
ished garage. Please call lor 
appointment. Assumablo 30 
years FHA ARM at 7.5%. 
$135,500. (847) 740-0266. 



MCHENRY IRISH PRAIR- 
IE CONDO, 2-bedroom, 2- 
bath, garage, washer/dryer. 
Available now. $800/monlh 
plus security. Pels negoliable. 
(847)587-6164. 

MODERN SPACIOUS 2- 
BEDROOM, 2-story town- 
house, 2.5 bath, convontenlly 
set in a beautiful location close 
to Abbott. Includes attached 
garago, patio, lots of storage 
and all appliances. Laundry 
area upstairs. Asking 
Sff2.500. (847)625-7344. 

MUNDELEIN TOWN- 
HOUSE 2YRS., end unit, 2- 
bedrooms, 2-balhs, upgrades, 
groat location 1 , $117,900. 
(847) 918-0714. 

WAUCONDA CONDO FOR 
SALE, Crestview Estates, 2- 
bedrooms, 2-balhs, fireplace, 
walk-in master closet, 
$95,000. (847) 487-4990. 



518 



Mobile Homes 



GRAYSLAKE 

CONDO LIFESTYLE 

At a fraction of tho cost. 

Now 2-bodroom, 2-balh, 

overlooking open fields. 

Under S50.000. 

Chain O'Lakes Mobile Homes 

Rl. 120 & Fairfield. 

f847) 546-3154. 

MOBILE HOME, 1964 Mag- 
nolia, 10x50. New carpet, 
deck, A/C, 2-bedrooms, com- 
pletely furnished, double pane 
windows. At Rockland Park in 
Knollwood, 3 miles from base. 
$4K. Call (847) 234-3953 any- 
time. II not thero, leave mos- 
sago. 



MODULARS - DOU- 

BLEWIDES - SINGLEWIDES 
- ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMES. 
FOUNDATIONS, BASE- 

MENTS, GARAGES, SEPT- 
ICS - WE DO IT ALU! FREE 
'STATEWIDE DELIVERY/IN- 
STALLATION. RILEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1-600- 
798-1541. 



WAUCONDA SINGLE BED- 
ROOM, renovated, C/A, 
washer/dryer, dishwasher 
extra storage. Accepting rea- 
sonable oilers. Must see to ap- 
preciate. John (630) 
556-3671, Jackie (B47) 526- 
9662. 



FOX LAKE 
HARBOR VIEW 
APARTMENTS 

One Bedroom Apartments 
Near Lake On Quiet Street. 
Newly decorated and car- 
peted. Cable available. No 
dogs, f bedroom $525. 

847-295-5105 




LOOK WHAT'S COMING 
UP IN Lakeland 

"HOT REAL ESTATE HOMES WAITING FOR YOU" 
REAL ESTATE SECTION 

2x3 WITH PROPERTY PHOTO 

only S 66°° 
(Regular price for a 2x3 $117.00) 

You Save $51 .00 
2x1 WITH PHOTO 

Only *25°° You Save $14.00 

CALL YOUR ACCOUNT 
EXECUTIVE TODAY AT 

223-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 






This 4 br, 2.5 ba, huge family room 

w/fircplacc, dining room, large kitchen 

w/ breakfast nook. Huge bonus room and 

so much more! * 

$000,000 

Lakeland Realty 

847-000-000 



520 



Apartments For Renl 



520 



I Apart men [j For Renl 



CRYSTAL LAKE 3-BED- 
ROOM, 1-balh, basement, 
near train, A/C, stove/refrlg- 
Brator, dishwasher, no 
pels/waterbeds, $800/monlh 
plus security.. Available 3/15. 
(815)455-3084. g 

FOR RENT 1-BEDROOM, 
2nd door apartment In Round 
Lake, air conditioned. 
5495/monlh +securily "on lime 
rent rebalo program". Lf- 
sensed III. Realtor. (847) 
546-8730. 

GRAYSLAKE 1-BED- 

ROOM PLUS den. 

S625/month. (847) 543-0485. 

GRAYSLAKE 1-BED- 
ROOM, AIR, heat, garago, 2- 
family, pool, no pels, lease, 
S650/month plus security. 
(847) 362-9497. 

GURNEEAVAUKEGAN 

NORTH SHORE 

APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices. 

Spacious. 

Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location. 

Easy to Toll Roads, 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

(847) 244-9222. 

KENOSHA 10BOO 39TH 

AVE. 2 miles North of Stale 
Line, 5 miles East of I-94. 
Country condo, 2-bedroom, 
with appliances. S560/month 
plus security deposit. Large 
yard. Pets negoliable. Gerald 
(847) 548-2054. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
S590-S720/monih. Heat, wa- 
ter, air included. (847) 
356-5474. - 

FOX LAKE LARGE WA- 
TERFRONT 1-BEDROOM 

apartment, laundry facilities, 
A/C, heat/water included. 
(847) 662-0034. 

LIBERTYVILLE 2-BED- 
ROOM, 2-BATH, 2-blocks 
from train. S850-S9007monlh. 
Lovinger Real Estate (647) 
244-4220. 

ONE BEDROOM APART- 
MENT, Lake Villa Township. 
Secluded area, second floor, 
seoo/monlh. plus electric. 
(847) B386347,- 

WAUKEGAN 2-BEDROOM 
APARTMENTS, security 

building, heat and water in- 
cluded. Nice Waukogan aroa. 
(847) 316-3797. 




*-•:!£ 



''.-,■ 



an 

GOCHKa 17QQG3 
lSG^QtJCD 

Spacious 2 Bedroom Apartments 
• lor 1-1/2 Bath Available 
alio or Balcony with Individual 
■ Short Term Leasing Available 
LEHMANN REALTY SERVICE 




(847)395-7997 . ■ 
0ii$qr& : Sun Coll '(630)232^08^. 




O/VKRIOGE VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing for 
Qualified Applicants. 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

I & 2 Bedroom Apartments 

Stop in at: 

299 Oakridge Court in Antioch 

Or call: 

847-395-4840 
f=r 1-800-526-0844 TDD 

gasss; Managed by Meridian Group, Inc. 



MANOR 



Ar AMI Ml MT K 



G.P. MAHACBWEin; IMG. 

1&2 Bedroom Apartment! 
In Antioch & Lake Villa 

Antioch Manor Apartment* 
antioch | 445 Donin Dr., Anlioch 
847-395-0949 
Deap Lake 
Hermitage Apartmenli 
149 N. Milwaukee Ave, 
" Lake Villa 
3^ 847-356-2002 

<•>, I«lt Illall,,, 

m NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION & 



KHQsss&ir viSiKvw&v 



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. ONSKl.KLT 

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ONE & TWO 

BEDROOM 

APARTMENTS 

• Flexible Leasing "Q«i** 

• Free Credit Check "?-* ! 







Anlinch 


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Minor 






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847-395-0949 

445 Donin Dr., Antioch 



Jwtoirk 




■ i » n ■»■■■ : *' ■ ■»■ 



"DOMINOE" 

"Dominoe" is a larger mid-size, 
Murdily built mostly InWpaintcr 
mix. lie is a handsome ilog wiilt 
a shiny htiick, short coal, and a 
j,;: while blaze on his chest. Just 
: three years old, Dominoe is a 
neutered male with a terrific personality. Labs: arc known for their 
outstanding temperament and ability In blend well into a family. 
Dominoe is a smatt dog full of responsive altenlivencss and he has 
a playful, outgoing disposition. Dominoe is eager to learn and will 
train easily. This wunderful dog has been overlooked here at 
Orphans far too long. I le first came to the shelter in August of lWfi 
and should have l>ccn adopted into a loving home long ago, lf you 
ire looking for a ler rifle companion animal who will |>c a loyal and 
enthusiastic friend, please tome and sec Dominoe. 'lids fine dog 
deserves a family to call his own, 

ALL DOGS BENEFIT FROM HASIC 

IIOUSHimUAKINO/OHUDIENCF TRAINING WHICH IIFLI'S 
IIOND DOG TO OWNER. CRATING IS RECOMMENDED 
THE FIRST YEAR WHEN THEOWNER IS AWAY IF NEEDED. 

Cash'SSS donation includes free spay/neuter, collar, tag, leash, firsl 
shots, follow up care and much more. 

Oiphans of the Storm is located at 2200 Rivcrwnods Rd„ 
Dccrfield. 1 lours are 1 1 am - 5 pm, seven days a week. Call (K47) 
945-0235 for further information, 



1 ■' *- j - 



520 



Apartmenli For Rent 



LUXUMT APAA.TMENTS 

KENOSHA- 1/2 mite from 
1-94 on Hwy 50. Just a short 
drive to luxury living. Brand 
new 1 & 2 Bdrm Affordable 
Luxury Apts. Washer/Dryer 
& pantry in every unit. 
Exercise room, clubhouse, 
pool & pond. Sunrooms & 
underground parking avail- 
able. Pets considered. Call 
lo reserve yours now. 
Now Open 
Sal A Sun 12 to 5 
4I4-6S2-RENT 



msmm 

VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave., Zion 

1,2 & 3 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

Appliances • On-Site 
Manager • No Pels 

Starting from 5495/mo. 

Call Martha & Issac 
(847)746-1420 

or BEAR PROPERTY 
MANAGEMENT 
(414)697-9616 



EH 



Apl/llomcs 
To Shan: 



ANTIOCH ROOMMATE 

needed immedialety, to share 
2-bodroom apartmenl, M/F, 
S347/month includes utilities. 
Must pay for long distance 
calls. Pager (847) 216-2172. 

MUNDELEIN ROOMMATE 
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY, 
lo sharo 2-bedroom, 2.S balh. 
now townhomo. S500/month 
plus 1/2 utilities. Near Rt. 60 & 
Bullorflold. (8<17) 367—4890. 



530 



Rooms For Rent 



FOX LAKE FURNISHED 

SLEEPINGROOM, 1r90 utili- 
ties, close lo train, parking, 
coin laundry. Page mo al (70B) - 
701-0258, 

SPACIOUS FURNISHED 
SLEEPING ROOM., located in 
Kenosha, just over stale line. 
Ront SBS/week. 1-week es- 
crow. Utilities, cable, kitchen, 
laundry, bath privileges Includ- 
ed. No pets-alcohol-drugs. Re- 
sponsible mature person do- 
sired. Navy personnol wol- 
come. (414) 654-7817 alter 
6pm. ^___ 

SPACIOUS ROOM FOR 

RENT in Konosha, just over 
Stale lino. S75/week. 1 v/ook 
escrow. Modestly furnished, 
beautiful view. Ulllilies. kitch- 
en, laundry, balh privileges in- 
cluded. No pols : alcohol- 
drugs. Navy personnel wel- 
come. (414) 654-7817 alter 
6pm. • 

WAUCONDA FOX RIVER 
VALLEY GARDEN sleeping- 
room, kttchon privileges, free 
cable. No smoking. 
$290/monlh* security deposit 
and references. (847) 
639-8979. 



534 



Business Properly 
For Sale 



New 750 sq. fl. carpeted 
office w/AC, located on 
Grass Lie. Rd. by 
Undenhurst, IL I las tun 
private rooms plus open rec|it. 
area, enhanced wiring for 
computers and plwnes, a covered 
entry, lighted road sign and 
ample paikin|>. Ideal for law, 
Insurance. Accountants, Realtors 
or Counseling uffices. J4'J5.0Q 
mo. Call 6-1 7.356, 164 1 



538 



Business Property 
For Itonl 



ISLAND LAKE OFFICE 
SPACE AVAILABLE 

S300/month & up, total spaco 
1600sq.fl. (312)335-6102. 

PRlW&" 'LAKE VILLA OF- 
FICE SPACE. Located on Rt. 
132, In a lovely solting. (2) 
units for ront. (1) approximate- 
ly 425sq.tl„ (1) 1, 080sq.«. 
Ploaso call for more Inlo. (847) 
356-8886. 



■ 




March 13, 1998 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers i C29 



1538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



2,000. COMMERCIAL 
SQ.FT., 5750/monih, high 
visibility, heat, H20 and gar- 
bage included, perfect for 
store or office; Cedar Lake 
Rd„ In' Round Lake Beach. 
(847) 356-6309, (847} 548- 
1360. ' ■ 

450 LIBERTY ST., WAU- 
CONDA, ILL. Former Sears 
Paint & Hardware, 

I0.500sq.ft., sprinklered build- 
ing, large parking area. Will re- 
model. Immediate possession. 
Pru dential (647) 673-2340. 

COMMERCIAL RT. 12 Fox 
Lake, 1 ,200sq.ft.. • office, store, 
deli, S900/month. - (708) 
788-5564 leave message. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH. 913 
West Rollins Road. High traf- 
fic. Retail Space. 1,000-5,500 
square feet. Will divide. S5-S12 
per square foot. Call (847) 
740-4596. - 

SUB-LEASE 9.000SQ.FT., 
18FT. ceiling, twin load level- 
er docks. Perfect for dry stor- 
age or other. Good Grayslake 
location. Available Immediate- 
ly. Very reasonable. Call Karen 
(847) 740-4035. 



B1RGAIN 



SHOPPER 



12 VOLT KAWASAKI, S75. 
6 Volt Corvette Car. $75. (847) 
526-^612. 

DO YOU HAVE 

SOMETHING TO SELL 

FOR $75 OR LESS? 

Place your ad In this section 

for only $3.00 for 10 words or 

less. Must be prepaid. 

Call Lisa (647) 223-6161 

ext, 140 or send the ad with 

with your payment to: 

Lakeland Publishers, 

P. O. Box 268, 

30 S. Whitney St., 

Grayslake III. 60030. 

Atten: Lisa. 



560 



Vacant Lot/Acreage 



ANTIOCH 2-HOMESITES 
IN Pine Hills Lake Subdivision, 
S35,000/ea./best. (847) 
367-6394. pager (708) 504- 
3133. 

JOHNSBURG LOT 3/4 acre 
In aroa of newer homes, com- 
munity water, close to high 
school, $46,000. (815) 
344-6324. 

SPRING MEADOWS AT- 
TRACTIVE lot, motivated 
seller, $45,000. (414) 
654-2879. 



568 



OutOfAreaPropert) 



GEORGIA - FOR SALE/THE 
DHL HOUSI BED * 
BREAKFAST. Fl. Gainoi, GA. 

Individually listed on Historic 
Register, tin t820's w/ 10 bdrms, 
10 bihs. commercial kitchen, 
owners quarters. Land end Lake 
Sales, 912.334-8104 



K 



■c-^^^^r™ 



« 



OREGON- 430 Aae 

Oregon Ranch, Grants Pass. 
4,200* homo, Quest house, barn, 
take & 9.000' darmrlory Ideal 
School camp or retreat. 
$1,490,000. Call 619-673-1250. 
Box 270351, San Diego, CA 
92128. 
" ■" 



568 



Out Of Area Property 



I 



•S.W. MICHIGAN - 1 

I For Sale By Owner - 
^Completely remodeled 
j home on beaut St. 
J Joseph River. 3BR/ 
:2,5BA, 2c gar, city 
a sewer, irrigation sys, 
• 2.6ac open & wooded 
Eland. Break wall on river : 
5 lor dock. S250K. Call for | 
■ appt 
!61 6-684-6689 



IDAHO-CATC & BOWUNG 
CEWTBL Est 1975, One 
Owner. Central Idaho mountains. 
Loc'd on Highway 93 along ' 
Salmon River golf course, good 
schools, fishing, hunting, hiking, 
(299,000. 308-870-4448 Or 
308-879-2413. 



SOUTH DAKOTA- 

For Sale with 7% Lease Bade 
1078 aca Eastern South Dakota 
land, prime doer, duck, goose, 
pheasant hunting. S800.000. 
KEMINK LAND COMPANY. 
Walortown, 3D., Rod Kemlnk 
Broker, 605-606-0440. 



MICHIGAN, BARRY COUNTY- 
2200ac. lake, 250' frntgo, exquis- 
ite 6,600' home on 2 acs captur- 
ing all the charm & grace of an 
era long to? gotten, perfect for 
Mini Eslato, Bed & Breakfast or 
Restaurant. A One of a kind! 
1995,000. McFarland A Assoc, 
Inc. (616) 353-3100 



SOUTHERN IOWA- 

Graln & Livestock Ranch. 2335 
acs («*•); 758 ac corn base, 2 
homes, $2.4 Million. Also; 2650 
ac. resort w/ 450 ac lako (great 
Jhuntlng S fishing), $3.3 Million. 
Call John Bales R.E, 515-647- 
2934 for Info; either or both. 



MISSOURI -612 acs. 
Barton Cty (125 mi. S. of 
Kansas City, 75 ml. to 
Springfield). Grain & cattle 
farm, barns, bins, 4br with 
c/a & heat, Irptc, att garage, 
$1200/ac. By Owner. Call 
417-682-5983 after 7pm. 



CARIBBEAN. Costa 

Rica Land For Sale. Own a 
hectarea (2.5ac) homesite. 
Pro-planted w/100s of teak 
trees (which will pay back 
your investment) for only 
S35K. Loc In Pinilla 
Guanacaste, the N. Pacific 
Coast, 10 mlna to most 
beaut, beaches. Army free 
democracy. 718-471-3720. 



Costa Rica Homes & Land For 
Sale. 2&3BR spanish-stylo 
homes for S175K. We can 
custom build. Loc In middle ol 
Costa Rica's 2 most beaut, bchs, 
Playa Flamingo & Playa 
Conchal, bet. only golf crse & 
yacht club in area. Looking to 
build beachfront casino hotel. 
Army free democracy. 
718-471-3720 



TRAVERSE CITY, Ml- 

For Sale by Owner. 
Lovely Victorian In 
historic district. 4BR/2BA, 
formal Lfl & DR, kit, 
breakfast room, den, 1st 
fl laundry, orig. wood 
Poors/ trims. 2500sf, 3 
blocks to bay, etc. S240K. 
616-922-3546. 



INDIANA 



- 1 



Tfmberlake Estates. A 

fly-in community. 57 beaul, 
wooded 1*1 Oac tots w/25ac 
lake & pvt landing strip. 
Loc'd 10minS. of 
Indianapolis, approx 40min 
S. of 465 on SR 67: For 
brochure call 317-241-4133 



[UJNOtS-VMDonCntr- 

For Sate By Owner - 
Must See! 138ac farm 
nestled along 1 mi of 
Vermilion River. 80ac till- 
able & pasture, remain- 
ing in woods. Hog con- 
finement, pond, 4BR 
home, 2 c gar, 2 Ig pole 
bldgs, rnach shop, grain „ 
bin, block bldg, horse 
barn & more. Beaut, set 
ting, secluded. $395K. 
For details 
217-662-6550 



578 



Heal Estate Misc. 



CASH Ml© 

We Buy 
Mortgages 

CALL JOHN 

847-362-8462 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



.1983 TOYOTA FULL SIZE * 
RV, 40,000 actual miles, fully 
self contained, $4,000/bBst. 
(647) 336-2775. 

1985 VOLKSWAGON, 

CAMPER VAN, excellent 
condition, , low mileage, 
S6.500/best. (847) 356-4161. 

CAMPER 5TH WHEEL, 
1995 Holiday Rambler, 36ft. 
long with generator, four sea- 
sons. Mint condition. (414) 
551-9916, (414) 654-0647. 

TIOGA MOTORHOME 

19B8, 27ft., loaded, excellent 
condition, generator, air, awn- 
ing, hydraulic jacks,, new tires 
and more, $18,500/best. 
. £414) 654-1291 after 5pm or 
on weekends. 



708 



Snowmobiles/ATVs 



3 



.1993 EXCITER SX. Both 
great condition. Very low 
miles. Must sell for 33,600, 
(847)566-1199. 

SNOWMOBILE TRAILER 
1995 Triton, 4-plaee, brakes 
salt shield, ski glides ano 
spare, $2,600. (847) 548- 
1854. 

SNOWMOBILES 1978 KA- 
WASAKI Invader 440, very 
fast. 1982 Ski-Doo Citation 
3500, new motor, clutch. One 
place snowmobile trailer, 
51 ,600/best. (847) 949-7827. 



710 


Boal/Molors/Etc 



1985 18FT. BOW RIDER, 
S2,500/best. (847)587-4136. 



1988 FORESTER 17FT. 
open bow, 4.3 Cobra stern 
drive, padded sun deck, ga- 
rage kept, very mint. Asking 
$8,000. (847) 244-7972 after 
6pm. 

1990 19FT. RINKER 186 
Captlva 175hp. Merer uiscr 
I/O, OB, power steering, back- 
to-back sealing, roll on trailer 
custom covers, swim platform. 
Excellent condition, low hours, 
S7.5Q0. (414) 377-9170, 

CAL 25FT. SAILBOAT, 
1974 model, with trailer, motor 
and good sail Inventory. Has 
autopilot, VHF, etc. Excellent 
first boat for Lake Michigan! 
$5,500 (very negotiable!) 
(847) 869-1222. E-mail: 
GPROSEPHS@AOL.COM 

WAVERUNNER 1995 PO- 
LARIS SL750, high perfor- 
mance Intake grate and ride 
plate, 32,700. E-mail sccart- 
er@lnd.com. (847) 526-7561. 



720 


Sports Equipment 



AEROBIC RIDER WITH ris- 
er, excellent condition, like 
new. Original 3300, asking 
S200/best. (847) 625-7391 
after 6pm. 




804 



Cars for Sale 



PING STYLE GOLF 

CLUBS for 6ft. person. Graf- * 
ite shafts, 3-woods, 10-irons, 
bag and carl, $325. Older Wil- 
son starter kit, 1-wood, 9-lrons 
with bag. Perfect for starters, 
$75. (647) 83B-8148. 

YAKIMA SST RACK with 3 
lockjaw bike racks and locks, 
best offer. (414) 942-1813 



1970 MUSTANG, 302 au- 
tomatic, air, power steering, 
runs good, looks good. (847) 
549-1531. 

1984 CAMARO T-TOPS, 

new exhaust, stall converter, 
transmission, built 350 en- 
gine, needs carburator, 
5750/bost. (815) 653-7056 

evenings. 



1984 LJNCOLN CONTI- 
NENTAL, automatic, air, low 
mileage, tapo deck, leather In- 
terror, well maintained, good 
condition, light blue. $4 100 
(847) 615-0985. 

1985 TOYOTA CRESIDA, 
all power, 5-speed standard, 
lots of new parts. Runs and 
looks nice, S1,950/be$t. (847) 
785-8779 after 4pm. 



1986 FORD ESCORT, 4- 
cylinder, 4-spoed, runs like 
new, mechanically excellent, 
like new tires, looks good, per- 
fect tor school or work, 
31,100/best. (847) 973-9420. 



TOYOTA TERCEL 1988. 
low mileage, stick, $1,300. 

J B471 362-9497. 



814 



Senice & Parts 



•DRIVE SHAFT SERVICE* 

Drive Axle and Supply Co. 

COMPLETE DRIVE 

SHAFT SERVICE. 

-Custom Mode. 

* Front Whool 

Drive Axles. 

* Computerized 

balancing. 

-FREE DELIVERY! 

And more. 

(414)639-2100. 




1981 GMC 3/4 TON VAN, 
automatic transmission, V8, 
good work van. $1,900. (414) 
763-9246. 

1984 CHEVY CONVER- 
SION VAN, runs great, 
S1,500/best. Call after 7pm 
(847) 746-3452. 

1989 CHEVROLET AS* 
TROVAN GLADIATOR 

CONVERSION MODEL, 

good condition, runs good, 
S2,600/best. (847) 223-5907. 

1991 FORD AEROSTAR 
XL extended, A/C, power 
locks/windoWs/mlrrors, tilt, 
cruise, 90,300 miles, excellent 
condition, $6,400. (847) 
548-7104. 

ONE TON VAN big V8, abso- 
lutely no rust, runs great. 1986 
Ford E-350, $3,695, (414) 
857-7999. 



828 



Four Wheel Drive 
jeeps 



S15 



Carpet Cleaning 



S57 



Painting/Decorating 



1956 FORD THUNDER- 
BIRD, V6, 70K, $2,000/best. 
(847) 639-7218 flftnr 6Dm. 

1986 MAZDA 323, 5-speed, 
84,000 miles, $1 ,600/best. 

(847)973-1041.* 

1988 LINCOLN TOWN 
CAR 302, V8, tan, no rust, 

Sl,800/b03t. (B47) 838-4034. 

1989 CHRYSLER NEW 
YORKER, $4,500/best. (847) 
625-8004 after 7pm. 

1992 FORD TAURUS 
WAGON, dual air bags, tan,; 
A/C, automatic, 61,000 miles, 
$4,800, (847) 973-9331. 

1992 TOYOTA COROLLA 
DX SEDAN, 4-door, excel- 
lent condilion,' 95,000 highway 
miles, $5.000/best. (847) 
360-8275. 

1993 CHEVY CAVALIER 
RS, red, 4-door, low mileage, 
excellent condition, 
36,600/firm or take over pay- 
ments. (847) 356-6709. 

1993 FORD PROBE, fully 
loaded, great condition, 
37,000/best. (847) 872-8104., 

1994 PLYMOUTH VOYAG- 
ER, 69K miles, 39,000/best. 
(847)356-6381. 

1994 TRANS AM GT LT1 
VB, 6-speed, 35,000 miles, 
$l2,900/best. (414) 652-7957. 

1995 GRAND AM, good 
condition, 4*door, 44K, 
$7,950. (847) 223-5036 after 
6pm. 

1995^ HONDA CIVIC LX, 
fully loaded, 60,000 highway 
miles, 310,000/best. (847) 
548-2691. 

1996 GRAND JEEP CHER- 
OKEE LAREDO, maroon, 

new tires, excellent condition, 
S1 7.900. (815) 344-6324. 

HONDA 
CARS FOR $100111 
Seized & Sold locally this 
monlh, Trucks, 4x4's, etc. 
(800)522-2730 . 

. ext 2292" -; 

GEO' PRIZM. isWf^-t 'door, 
automatic, A/C," am/fm stereo, 
no rust, $2,995. (0-17) 940- 
9689. ,,•--■-" 

IF YOU HAVE 

FURNITURE TO SELL, 

A car, or appliances, If 

you ore having a Garage 

Sale or If you have a 

house to sell or apartment 

to rent. 

Call Lisa before 10am 

Wednesday to place 

your ad here. 

(847)223-8161 

ext. 140. 

MOVING OUT OF STATE. 
MUST SELL 1997 BLACK 
PONTIAC SUNFIRE, 2- 
door, 5-speed, A/C, alarm sys- 
tem, cassette. Asking $12,000. 
(847)438-4180. 



1986 FORD F-150 4x4 pick- 
up, runs great,. $3,500. (847) 
587-9876 after 7pm. 




'j; TrucksTrallcrs 



1978 SILVERADO, FLORI- 
DA truck, 78,000 original, 

33,600/best. (414) 862-7157. 

1986 FORD CREW CAB 
DUALLY 93,000 miles, 4- 
speed, good condition, full, 
size cap. $4,500. (847) 816- 
8140 days, (847) 949-1851 

evenings. 

1988- FORD RANGER XLT. 
7ft. bed, 4-cylinder, 5-speed, 
matching century cap. Excel- 
lent condition. Serious Inqui- 
ries only. $2,700/best. (847) 
740-1908. 

1993 MAZDA B-2600, 
cab+, V6, 5-speed, air, 65K 
miles, very clean. Asking 
35,900. (847) 309-8877. 

CHEVY FORD PICK-UP , 
BODIES. Factory-new, guar- 
anteed from $1300.00. Doors 
from $89.00, Fenders from 
$50.00, Beds from $800.00, 
Bedliners from $169.00. 
BUMPERS, GRILLS, REPAIR 
PANELS, PAINTS, ABRA- 
SIVES, WINDSHIELDS, RA- 
DIATORS. Delivery. MARK'S 
(217) 824-6184. 



PROFESSIONAL CARPET 
CLEANING U.S.C. SERVIC- 
ES will guarantee the lowest 
overall price on expert carpet 
cleaning! Compare our prices 
and save. Our, cleaning In- 
; eludes a sail guard, deodoriz- . 
er and static guard that others 
charge extra for. Also no extra ' 
charge for spot removal, 
stairs, hallways, or travel timo. 
Just 1 low price of S.20 per 
sq.ft., for actual carpet sizes. 
With our 5 step method wo* 
power vacuum, pro-treat, ma- 
chine shampoo, power extract 
extra moisture and groom car- 
pet. For a healthy home, we 
remove dust, pollen; mold, 
bacteria, and dust mites. We 
leave your home fresher 
smelling, enhance Us ap- 
pearance and extended car- 
pet life. Call today for your ap- 
pointment or free estimate 
(847) 546-5600. Recom- 
mended by the world's best 
carpet . manufacturers, 3lyrs. 
experience. 



PRECISE PAINTING 
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR. 
•New construction or we 
can make It look like new! 
-Expert Wallpaper 
Removal 
-Wall Repair. 
-Ready to be painted 
or papered. 
Call us about 
Reasonable Ratos. 
CALL ABOUT SPRING 
DECK SPECIAL!! 
(847) 395-0490. 

Professional 
Services 



S72 



] 



WRITE FOR YOUI 

-X-Mas Cards 

* Wedding Invitations 

•Shower/Party Invitations. 

•Handwritten. 

• Reasonable rates. 

Call (815) 363-5330. 






844 


Motorcycles 



1981 HARLEY DAVIDSON 
SPORTSTER 1000cc, looks 
and runs great, new Fat Bob 
tank, seat and bags. Must 
see. Make offer. (414) 
843-3504 after 4:30pm. 

1983 SUZUKI RM-250, 
runs good, good condition, 
$600/best, (815) 363-6038. 

1989 HONDA CBR600, 

VSH type, low miles, sharp, 
$3,Q00/best. (647) 782-0501, 

1990 SOFT TAIL SPRING- 
ER 2,700, many extras, mint 
conditron, $i6,5O0/best. (847) 
356-4161. 

SPORTSTER 1989' B83E- 
VO 16K, lowered, tots of 
chrome. New rubber corbin 
seats, very clean, 36,500. 
(847) 590-1831. 



S30 


Firewood 


FANTASTIC 

FIREWOOD 

2 yr. old seasoned hardwood. 
Oak, ash, maple, cherry. $65.00 

per face cord mixed $75.00 
per face cord 1 00% oak. 

Free stacking and deSvery. 
Bay the wood that'i 
g amnt ccd to bum. 

(847) 546-3813 • (815) 344-9522 

1-80M3M2S2 

Credit Cards Accepted 


S39 


Housekeeping 



S75 


Radio/TV Repair 


ACTION VIDEO 
VCR REPAIR 

Servicing All Makes 

and Models. 

All Repairs Guaranteed. 

RICH GOODWIN 

1316 N.Cedar Lake Rd. 

Round Lake Beach. II. 60073. 

Antloch (847) 838-FREE 
Round Lake (847) 740-FREE 
Mundeteln (847) 949-TAPE. 


S78 


Remodeling 



SPRING HOUSECLEAN- 
ING WITH excellent refer- 
ences. Will also do light paint- 
ing; and wallpapering. (647) 
548-0706. 



[BEG^HiS 



S42 



Landscaping 



T. LAZZARETTO 

CONSTRUCTION 

OFFERS: 

•General Contracting 

•Interior Trim 

•Remodeling 

*Siding,.Sotfit, Facia 

♦Basement Finishing 

•Decks/Screen Porches 

•Additions 

•Window Replacement 

•Drywall & Painting. 

QUALITY WORK 

GUARANTEED!! 

Please call (847) 837-0677 

Ask for Tony. 

Fully Insured, i 




SKILLED CARPENTERS 
NEED WORKI Deal with the 
people who do the work and 
save money on room addi- 
tions, kitchens, baths and sid- 
ing. Call Rod Johnson (847) 
543-8972. 



• THINK SPRINGI 

WELTER LANDSCAPING 

& LAWN MAINTENANCE 

Let us help you get your yard 

ready for the coming season. 

Services Include: 

•Cleaning of all leaves 

and debris. 
•Edging & mulching of 

bedding areas. 

-Trimming of shrubs 

and bushes. 

Call Steve for FREE estimate. 

(8471 546-0415. 




BASEMENT WALL 

CRACKED OR BOWED? 
BASEMENT LEAKING? 

Grip-lite Anchors or Beaver 
Waterproofing corrects these 
problems in one day without 
excavating. Save thousands! 
Free estimates! 1-800-815* 
5689. 




NEED A WAY TO SELL THAT 
INEXPENSIVE ITEM? 

Fill out this form for 
Lakeland's New 

10 words or less gets you an ad for 63.00. Take advantage of 
this new section by filling out the form & sending payment 

to: 

Attn: Lisa 
c /o Lakeland Publishers 
PO. Box 360 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
or call with credit card 
(847) 223-8161 ext 140 
Must be prepaid, 

Please fill Lii the blanks, no more than 10 words 




telephone number 



C30 / Lakeland Neivspapecs. 



CLASSIFIED 



March 13, 1998 







Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 




-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 




TO PLACE: 

YOUR AD HERE 

CALL 

147-223-8161 



LAKE ONLINE 

www.lake-online.com 

Lake County's Hot Spot on the WWW! 
Over 1,000,000 Hits in 1997! 



•and- 



Internet Studio 
www.thei5tudio.com 

Effective Solutions 
Without the Techno-Babble 

•Web Site Production 
•Servers @ $49/Month 
•Local 56K Access! 



" The most successful business person 

Is the one who holds on to the old Just 

as long as It Is good and grabs the new 

Just as soon os ft Is better." 



847-395-9115 

191 Lake Street Downtown Anfioch 



Drive Shaft Service 

Drive Axle and Supply 

Complete drive shaft service, custom 
made, front wheel drive axles, 
computerized 
balancing, free 
delivery and more. 



$&<!§"- 



(414) 639-2100 



buyers; of non-ferrous metals 
Industrial scrap ; 



• COPPER 'BRASS -ALUMINUM* 

LEAD 'STAINLESS' 
♦ AUTO RADIATORS • CATALYTIC CONVERTERS * 

• BATTERIES 'INSULATED WIRE- 



PROMPT PICK UP I 
and DELIVERY 



378 Pftft Sim* ■CrySalUfcH. 

LoaM It/a* soft dHt.y v$ 
befriMGuSWen. 



PHONG: tt15-459<J44& 
jlnitrs- . 

- Mum 1 1. if ' '■ ihI.i , \\ i. 

S.l1lH|l.l|f Jr 1 



II eating 
Problems? 



Professional Solutions 
Reasonable Prices 

__ Call 

Heatwave 

SALES AND SERVICE 



Hi E.P.A. Certified -Insured 
| ttg^ Free Est. - Senior Dis. 

(847) 740-4127 



T. jLAZZARETTO 

CONSTRUCTION 

OFFERS: 

* General Contracting 
• Interior Trim •Remodeling 
•Siding, SoEHt, Fascia • Additions 
. 'Basement Finishing 
• Decks/Screen Porches 
A » Window Replacement 
7 * Drywall & Painting, 



m 

1 '4 



Quality Work 
Guaranteed!!! 

Cait C647J 837-0677 

Ask for Tony 

Fully insured 




i gfnrnTi T1 \ -Tir i ~m w 



Jack's 

REMODELING 

BASEMENTS 

Kitchens • Bathrooms • Decks 
Fascia ■ Soffit • Windows 

FREE ESTIMATES 

plus references 

CALL JACK AT 



! ;i i 



(847) 546-3759 




GEORGE (847) 548-5110 
VOICE MAIL (847) 674-8875 

Electrical 
Plumbing 



Kitchens - Baths 

• Basements 

• Additions 

• Decks 

• Remodeling 

20 YEARS LOCALLY - LICENSED 



Carpentry 
Drywall 
Painting 
BONDED 



INSURED 



-- ■■iiiii.i. . <i..».~...i ■ ' ■ 



FREE ESTIMATE (847) 548-5110 







Over ,40 years of 
"ty personal service 



ddock 

^construction inc. 

• custom homes • basements 

• design services • decks 

• additions 

Fully insured (847) 526- 1 500 
FREE Estimates Wauconda 

General Contractors 



A+ UNDSCAPIN& 
J&JFirewood 

$70 per face cord 
$200 full cord 

i (847) 680-7326 fc 

Dry S- (guaranteed to Bum £ 
Free Delivery and Stacking j\ 



K 



/ CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SERVICEJNC. 
/ ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
/ "Call Us For Fast Courteous Service" 
33265 N. Rte. 45 
Wildwood, IL 60030 
(847) 223-4682 
k RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL* 

— i *- ' w 





AFFORDABLE 
HOME REPAIRS 



HANDYMAN SERVICE 



Save money by using America's 

largest handyman service. 

Insured; bonded, guaranteed. 

(847)726-1061 

TH >eaf?l 




OFFICES IN 30 STATES 



ATUS CONCRETE UFTING 



DON'T REPLACE IT 



CRACKED, SUNKEN & 

TttTING CONCRETE 

CAN BE SAVED 

■ Driveways •Patios 

■Sideways 'Floors 

For More Info & Free Estimate 

573-9400 



Vernon Hill. 



II. 




IS THERE A 
DIVORCE 
IN YOUR 
FUTURE? 



If so, 
call us 
today for 
information! 

SIMPLE • FAST- NO ATTORNEYS 
(AltornL'y available on request) 

mwmmrz 

$125 

Wf. The People Business Center 
. 835 fi. Rollins, Round Iakl Beach 

| (847)548-1300 



OeVS CARPENTRY 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

START PLANNING NOW FOR YOUR SPRING PROJECTS! 

Remodeling* Additions • Basements • Kitchens • Decks 

Commercial & Residential 
Complete Architectural Design Services 

Serving Lake and McHenry Counties 
Completely Insured (847) 223-5346 



CREATIVE EXTERIOR CONCEPTS, INC. 







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££* Save 10% Up to $SOO 



VISA 



• Siding 

• Vinyl Windows 

• Bays & Bows 

• Patio Doors 




Roofing 
Soffit & Fascia 
Gutters 
Doors 



Licensed, Insured and Bonded 



(847) 72^-1060 



All American Homes Imp. 



■ SPECIALTY^ 

KITCHENS, 

BATHS & 

.BASEMENTS. 



; KITCHEN, 
| BATH & 
! BASEMENT 
S SPECIAL 

i $ 500 OFF 



PAINTING!! TILE 
SPECIAL I ! SPECIAL 
$95 *!()(> 



Per Room 

Labor Only 



1 1 
1 1 
1 1 



OFF 

J J Any Complete 
Tilt- job 



Cath For 



W@Q 



20 YEARS LOCALLY ' UCI-NSKD « BONDED * INSLKHI) 

Quality work, Dependable, Free Estimates 

mrD 548-5 1 1 m 



• Aluminum Cans 

• All Other Scrup Motaltt 

Industrial Accounts Welcome* 

Chicago Surplus 

11304 260th Avflnuo 
Trwvor, Wl 

U/X/jft Im//, Hi ft wi/rt I if/lfj rj hw)i\ Wis 

titfjC >/> t'il*A n*t </ WiSk Vi, Mi Wrt> '/> VJtix 

9 Vw fc '** V/ f &rji !f*A v, Utrf% Utwq. 

Mom, - Frl, 8;30am - 5pm 

Saturday 3;30am - 3:30pm 

(414)662-2517 

(414) 862-2554 



|A General Servicing 



Residential 

& Commercial 

Interior • Exterior 



D Painting D DrfWill Ripilr 

Z) Gimrit Ripiirt D hnu Wcthina 

ODiek Slilnln; & Sullnj 
Z> Ajjjftnsnt £ Houm rnilRltninci 
D TV £ Phom Jick Inttillillon 



St 



(847) 



973-9466 

Insured 




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I FANTASTIC FIREWOOD 

2-YBA* OW SEASONED MR WOOD 

OAK, ASH, MAPLE, CHERRY $65 (FCJ „ 
100% OAK $75 (FC) J±^M 
(8471 546-3613 ^ "**&»*% 
(815) 344-9522 
1-800-430-6262 



^v'£ 




* 
* 




For Over 200 Years One Of The Most 

Joyful Holidays For American Families 

Has Been Circus Day. 

Thisyear s Circus Day in Grayslake will be on Friday March J 
20th when Walker Bros. Circus gives Two Performances 
at 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. at Lake County Falrorounds, 

Rts 120 8. 45. 






Tickets On Sale One Hour Before Show Time 

Children's Tickets at 
Your Local Merchants 







• ••••••••••^A^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^J 



V ' i* '•. 




- 



March 13, 1998 



"CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C31 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



..* 



TO PLAGE 

YOUR AD HERE 

CALL 

847-223-8161 



"5 

a 



i 



To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 






/\ TRIAIMBLE 
DUCT OJEANINB 

• Residential • Commercial • Industrial 



Major reasons to Clean Your Air Ducts 
with our Power Vacuum System: 

Reduces Contaminants (Mildew, Dust, Bacteria, Dust Mites] 
• Reduces Odors • Boosts E/fidendes 
• Protect* Family Health • Reduce Allergy Symptoms 
All Work Guaranteed & Free Estimates 



SPECIAL 

Most Homes 

$199!!! 

(Include? Sanitizing) 



(847) 740-4571 



TREE £ SIUMP 
REMOVAL 



Land Clearing 

Wholesafe Seasoned 

Hardwood 

Nordstrom 
Tree Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 

(847) 526-0858 



»**l&« 



if?- 




PET SITTING" SERVICE 

Loving Can For When Youn Not There 
Extended Vlslu, Ovwinl|ttt Stay* af id Daily Care 
M jn^PrpfentonaUy Trained Sitter* 
fegt Jjf ^ Bonded-Insured 

Member of 
National Anoc of 

______ _ ___ . ProfeMlonol Pet Slttert 

Serving narringtoo, Cary, Island Lake, Lake 

Zurich, Wauconda 
ASK ABOUT OUR SAVINGS PROGRAMI 

(847)487-1651 




SAIT DELIVERY 

Water Soflncr Sail Carried i n To Your Softncr! 

Vie Sell and Install... 

• Water Softncrs " 

• R.O. & U.V. Systems 

• Whole House Fillers 

• Iron Filters and More. 

AM/PM Sales, Inc. 

(847) 671-3130 

mm: Water Analyci* ami CoruulUtion 




****************** 






Painting, Wallpapering 

Expert Installation 

Pap cr • Fabric-Vinyl 







♦ , v INSURED ■■■■■■-> * 

S (847)195^8428: 



Paul's Firewood 



Mixed Hardwood $69 (FC) 
Oak 870 (FC) 

Cherry/Hickory S89 (FC) £& 

•free Stacking gag 

•Free Delivery Era 

CB»» 740-SH97 



6 










-« TRU-CO "Tittle" 8 

Construction Improvements 
REMODEL NOW! 






KITCHEN, BATHROOM AND 
BASEMENT REMODELING 

C A \/C 1 H O/ OFF LABOR & 
- SAVE 1 U /o OFF MATERIALS" 

As/c about our OFF-SEASON prices for: 
Windows, Siding, Soffit/Fascia & Roofing! 

Consolidate your high 

interest credit cards & 

loans into one low monthly 

payment! Credit Problems 

Understood! 

• ALL WORK GUARANTEED • 
FULLY LICENSED, BONDED & INSURED 

free in-home 1-888-33TRIKO 

CONSULTATION (1-880-338-7826) 



i ;' : »}* e sf 4 5| g| y B 3 I J ff <U g 






Miracle 
Winters B 

"Fully Insured" 

Residential/Commercial 

(Dec/r sealing available) 

(847)210-7159 

(847)247-1676 



FREE Estimates • Ask for Mark 



B^™^®®^ 




:> 



[ KIKHENS/B At EMENTJ 

CARPENTRY - TILE 

SMALL JOBS Oli 

TOMKIOLBA5A 
<847) J95-1898. 



TOP PRICE | 
PAID 

We pay more for old or 
scrap gold. No amount 
too small or too large! 

(847) 
438-0125 




** 



tri 



DONT THROW AWAY t 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP D0CT0RS t 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIcInC^ 

33261 fc. Highway 45 

Wllowood, IL 60030 

(£47) 223-8691 




DIRECTORY 



ACTWEGGE.LTD. 

Enrolled Agents • CPA 

Established Since 1960 

265 Center St • Grayslake 

(847) 223-0777 

COMPREHENSIVE TAX SERVICES 

Free Electronic Filing wl pd. return* 

564 N. Route 83 • Grayslake 

Daniel E. Coulon, EA 

(847)223-4040 

JOHN KARMEL & CO., CPA 

1641 N. Milwaukee • Libertyuille 

Individual _& Business Taxes 

Reasonable Rates 

(847) 367-5600 

STEWART M. GRANT & ASSOC 

28 E. Grand Ave. • Fox Lake 

Individual • Partnerships • 

Corporations • Tursts & Fiduciary 

(847) 587-9555 



^Thc .Bodies Love Correction^ 2__ I 




W'^?J^i 



jid Carmcd By A.C* 



fH^Icowate^Store 

r MMawMQi.oif*trrffai?g«rr 



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Licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



ROOFING 

SIDING & TRIM 

SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

WINDOWS* DOORS 

DECKS ♦AWNINGS 

Repair & Insurance Work 

(847)438-6634 



Quality 

Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 




•Since 




Let Us Do Your 
Honey Do List 

METROPOLITAN SERVICES, INC. 

1959 •Fully Insured # 24 Hour Emergency Service 

■ Painting. Interior & Exterior 
■ Wallpaper Removal 
Drywall Repairs 
■ Rotted Wood Replacement 
■ Carpentry 

■ Duct Cleaning 
• Carpet Cleaning 

Drapery Cleaning 



Fire, Smoke & Water Restoration 




Q 




■ find Much More 
CALL US TODAY FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE 

(847) 367-8500 tw 

729 East Park Ave. • Libertyville, Illinois 60048 



CJI 



Lakeland Publishers, Inc. 

'98 Health and 
Fitness Fair 

FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY 



Saturday, March 28, 1998 

10:00 am to 3:00 pm 
College of Lake County 

C Module Auditorium 

(Blue Sign in Front of Entrance) 

1 935 1 Washington, Grayslake 

f REE ATTRACTIONS 

Round Lake Beach Police Department Kid I.D. Kits 

(Photos & Finger Printing) 

Blood Source Blood Service - Blood Donations 

Clinic For Dolls & Beanie Babies 
(Physicals For The Toys Of Kids) 






Face Painting • Blood Pressure 
Stress Relaxation Tapes 
Home Health Care Items 
Body Fat Testing • First Aid Kits 
Complementary Guest Classes On Fitness 
Chair Massages • Posture Exams 
Arthritis Screenings . 
Diabetes Screenings "Toothbrushes • And Much More! 

DEMONSTRATIONS AND SEMINARS ON: 

Jazzercise • Weight Loss • Laser Hair Removal 
Chiropractic Care • Osteoporosis - Bone Health Care 

And More! 



DONATE BLOOD 

At Lakeland Publishers* Blood Drive 
in conjunction with 

LIFESOURCE Blood Services 

When you give blood you give another birthday, another 

anniversary, another day at the beach, another night under the 

stars, another talk with a friend, another laugh, another hug, 

another chance. GIVE BLOOD • GIVE LIFE! 



WIN DOOR PRIZES: 

• Gourmet Gift Basket ($ 1 00 Value) 

• Gym Bag Filled With Merchandise 

• Free Month of Jazzercise 

• Full I Hr. Body Massage by 

Certified Massage Therapist 

• Beanie Babies {Every 1/2 Hr.) 

• $50.00 Gift Certificate for Dover Straits 

• I Pair Eyeglasses ($200.00 Value) 

•Two $25.00 Gift Certificates forToys--R-Us 

• Cordless Remote Phone 

• Big Button Phone 

• Fanny Packs 

• Cervical Pillows 

• Lumbar Pillows 

• Free Bone Health Evaluation 

(Osteoporosis - $400.00 Value) 

• Free Fitness Training Session 

• Alzheimer Care Book 

• Three i Year Subscriptions To Lakeland Newspapers 

with 3-D'Card ($150.00 Value Each) 
AND MORE! 



'$$$&$& 



M e« him and get (,i s 
tl „ aut0 « r aphat 
The Body Tailors' booth. 



Sponsored by: 

Lakeland Publishers, Inc. 
and College of Lake County 



V